Courses

Art and Film in Weimar Germany

32100
CMST 22100, ARTH 26000/36000, GRMN 23100/33100
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
R. Heller

The period of the Weimar Republic in Germany, from the end of World War I and the collapse of Imperial Germany in 1918 to the rise to power of Adolf Hitler and Nazism in 1933, was a time of intense economic, social and intellectual turmoil and revolution.

Film in India

34100
CMST 24100, Anth 20600/31100, Hist 26700/36700, SALC 20500/30500
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
R. Inden

Considers the film world from 1975 to the present. Most attention will be paid to the Hindi film and especially to its "peculiar" features, for example, the song and dance. Emphasis is placed on the reconstruction of film-related activities which can be taken as life practices from the stand point of "elites" and "masses," "middle classes," men and women, people in cities and villages, governmental institutions, businesses, and the "nation." The course will rely on people's notions of the everyday, festive days, paradise, arcadia and utopia to pose questions about how people try to realize their wishes and themselves through film. How film practices articulated with nationalism, first in the wake of a failing "socialist pattern of development," and, then, with "liberalization," of the promise or threat "free markets" would bring, will be the major concern. A brief look will also be taken at how film is related to other media such as television. Some comparisons with Hollywood will be made. Students will be asked to familiarize themselves with existing approaches to Indian film against the background of more general approaches to film and the media. Some knowledge of Hindi desirable but not required (films will be subtitled in English and have English synopses). One film per week will be shown. Requirement: One 10-page paper, written in two stages.

Beginning Photography

37600
CMST 27600, COVA 24000
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
L. Brown

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Methods and Issues in Cinema Studies

40000
ArtH 39900, ENGL 48000, MAPH 33000
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
T. Gunning

This course offers an introduction to ways of reading, writing on, and teaching film. The focus of discussion will range from methods of close analysis and basic concepts of film form, technique and style; through industrial/critical categories of genre and authorship (studios, stars, directors); through aspects of the cinema as a social institution, psycho-sexual apparatus and cultural practice; to the relationship between filmic texts and the historical horizon of production and reception. Films discussed will include works by Griffith, Lang, Hitchcock, Deren, Godard.

History of International Cinema, Part I, Silent Era

48500
CMST 28500, ARTH 28500/38500, ENGL 29300/48700, MAPH 33600
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
Y. Tsivian

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of Instructor

Seminar: Drama, Theatre, Image, Performance

62200
ENGL 59300, CMLT 42600
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
L. Kruger

This PhD intensive reading course examines theoretical texts that deal with the interdisciplinary issues arising out of the confluence and conflict of word, image, and performance in various cultural contexts. Central concerns will include dramatic action, theatricality, visual and aural representation, and the competing phenomenologies of audience experiences of performance and cinema/video. We will be looking closely at the nature of drama and theatre, the mediation of performance through cinema and video, and the ways in which drama and theatricality manifest themselves in cultural activity more broadly. We will also scrutinize the ways on which metaphors of theatricality and performativity have been appropriated by other disciplines. Requirements: ACTIVE class participation; two presentations (P/F) and a short position paper (grade).

Religion and Modernity in Film

24300
CMST 34300, ANTH 21900/32400, HIST 26800/36800
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
R. Inden

Considers the problem of how popular films in the US, Europe, and Asia have represented the conventional religions' relation to modernity: the idea of film practices ("youth culture") as constituting a secular religion alternative or antagonistic to the conventional religions and the recuperation and transformation of conventional religiosity in modernist, especially patriotic and science-fiction films as a national theology ("civil religion"). One to two films per week will be shown. Requirement: One 10-page paper, written in two stages.

Women and New China Cinema

25400
CMST 35400, CHIN 25400/35400, EALC 25400
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Xiaobing Tang

In this course we will study the representation of women in a series of films from different stages of New China cinema. Specifically we will examine a collection of "rural films" (such as Li Shuangshuang and Ermo) in which the transformation of a female character constitutes the central action. We will explore questions of a film genre, quotations, subjectivity and the projection of desire. All readings in English.

Charlie Chaplin: The Man, the Artist, the Cultural Hero

26400
CMST 36400, ARTH 28900/38900
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Y. Tsivian

The three aspects stressed in the course title define the approach to (and explain the significance of) this key figure in the history of film and twentieth-century culture. As a man, Chaplin was a frequent target of large-scale political and sexual scandals; as an actor-director he was not only responsible for the Tramp figure, but also for such genres as social-comedy and comedy-melodrama; as a myth, Chaplin's figure was key to a number of twentieth-century art movements, such as Expressionist poetry, Cubist painting, and Soviet Constructivist art.

Film Aesthetics, Spectatorship, and Cinema Experience

27100
ENGL 28000, GSHU 20700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
M. Hansen

This course focuses on the relation between the film medium, its aesthetic possibilities and practices, and the forms of reception mandated by and available within the institution of cinema. Beginning with a few classical film theorists (Balazs, Kracauer, Eisenstein, Benjamin), we will explore questions of film aesthetics and spectatorship through more contemporary theorists in the psychoanalytic-semiotic vein (Metz, Baudry, Mulvey) as well as from the perspective of recent film history (Gunning, Musser, Tsivian, Carbine, Hansen) which emphasizes the significance of the entire cinema experience - the social space of the theater, music, programming, the public horizon of the audience - for the process by which films convey meaning, pleasure, and subjectivity.

Slavic Critical Theory from Jakobsen to Zizek

27200
CMST 37200, BALT 28500/38500, GSHU 21300/31300
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
M. Sternstein

This seminar style course surveys the cultural and literary theory of critics including Roman Jakobson, the Russian Formalists, Jan Mukarovsky, the Prague School, Mikhail Bakhtin, Tzvetan Todorov, Julie Kristeva, Mikhail Epstein, Slavoj Zizek and the Slovenian Lacanians.

Beginning Photography

27600
CMST 37600, COVA 24000
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Theories of Media

27800
CMST 37800, ARTH 25800/35800, COVA 25400, ENGL 12600/32600
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
W.J.T. Mitchell

This course explores the fundamental questions in the interdisciplinary study of visual culture: What are the cultural (and by the same token, natural) components in the structure of visual experience? What is seeing? What is a spectator? What is the difference between visual and verbal representation? How do visual media exert power, elicit desire and pleasure, and construct the boundaries of subjective and social experience in the private and public spheres? How do questions of politics, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity inflect the construction of visual semiosis?

History of International Cinema, Part II, Sound Cinema to 1960

28600
CMS 48600, ARTH 28600/38600, ENGL 29600/48900, MAPH 33700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
T. Gunning

This is the second part of the international survey history of film covering the sound era up to 1960. It is strongly recommended that students take the first section first. This survey will deal with issues of film form, industry organization and film culture during three decades, focusing on the crystallization of the Classical Hollywood Film as a key issue. But international alternatives to Hollywood will also be discussed, from the unique forms of Japanese cinema to movements like Italian Neo-realism and the beginnings of the New Wave in France. Film style, from the classical scene break down to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting) will form the center of the course, while attention will also be paid to the development of a film culture. Texts will include Bordwell and Thompson, Film History: An Introduction, and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, Godard and others. Screenings will include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Classical French Cinema

33400
CMST 23400, FREN 23400/33400
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
N. Herpe

Classic French cinema (from the earliest filmmakers to the beginnings of the New Wave) will be studied through the examples of ten movies, which influenced its history and represented the development of an esthetical movement: the French school before 1914 (Louis Feuillade's Fantômas), the "avant-garde" of the 20s (Jean Epstein's La Chute de la maison Usher), the surrealist cinema (Luis Buñuel's L'Age d'or), the musical comedy (Rene Clair's Le Million), the "100% talking" film (Sacha Guitry's Le Roman d'un tricheur), the poetic realism (Jean Renoir's La Bête humaine, Marcel Carne Le Jour se lève), the cinema under the Occupation (Henri-Georges Clouzot's Le Corbeau), the evocation of the Belle Epoque (Max Ophuls' Le Plaisir), the revival of the literary adaptation (Robert Bresson's Journal d'un cure de campagne.

Religion and Modernity in Film

34300
CMST 24300, ANTH 21900/32400, HIST 26800/36800
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
R. Inden

Considers the problem of how popular films in the US, Europe, and Asia have represented the conventional religions' relation to modernity: the idea of film practices ("youth culture") as constituting a secular religion alternative or antagonistic to the conventional religions and the recuperation and transformation of conventional religiosity in modernist, especially patriotic and science-fiction films as a national theology ("civil religion"). One to two films per week will be shown. Requirement: One 10-page paper, written in two stages.

Women and New China Cinema

35400
CMST 25400, CHIN 25400/35400, EALC 25004
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Xiaobing Tang

In this course we will study the representation of women in a series of films from different stages of New China cinema. Specifically we will examine a collection of "rural films" (such as Li Shuangshuang and Ermo) in which the transformation of a female character constitutes the central action. We will explore questions of a film genre, quotations, subjectivity and the projection of desire. All readings in English.

Charlie Chaplin: The Man, the Artist, the Cultural Hero

36400
CMST 26400, ARTH 28900/38900
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Y. Tsivian

The three aspects stressed in the course title define the approach to (and explain the significance of) this key figure in the history of film and twentieth-century culture. As a man, Chaplin was a frequent target of large-scale political and sexual scandals; as an actor-director he was not only responsible for the Tramp figure, but also for such genres as social-comedy and comedy-melodrama; as a myth, Chaplin's figure was key to a number of twentieth-century art movements, such as Expressionist poetry, Cubist painting, and Soviet Constructivist art.

Slavic Critical Theory from Jakobsen to Zizek

37200
CMST 27200, BALT 28500/38500, GSHU 21300/31300
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
M. Sternstein

This seminar style course surveys the cultural and literary theory of critics including Roman Jakobson, the Russian Formalists, Jan Mukarovsky, the Prague School, Mikhail Bakhtin, Tzvetan Todorov, Julie Kristeva, Mikhail Epstein, Slavoj Zizek and the Slovenian Lacanians.

Beginning Photography

37600
CMST 27600, COVA 24000
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Theories of Media

37800
CMST 27800, ARTH 26000/36000, COVA 25400, ENGL 12800/32800, MPAH 33000
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
W.J.T. Mitchell

This course explores the fundamental questions in the interdisciplinary study of visual culture: What are the cultural (and by the same token, natural) components in the structure of visual experience? What is seeing? What is a spectator? What is the difference between visual and verbal representation? How do visual media exert power, elicit desire and pleasure, and construct the boundaries of subjective and social experience in the private and public spheres? How do questions of politics, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity inflect the construction of visual semiosis?

History of International Cinema, Part II, Sound Cinema to 1960

48600
CMS 28600, ArtH 28600/38600, ENGL 29600/48900, MAPH 33700
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
T. Gunning

This is the second part of the international survey history of film covering the sound era up to 1960. It is strongly recommended that students take the first section first. This survey will deal with issues of film form, industry organization and film culture during three decades, focusing on the crystallization of the Classical Hollywood Film as a key issue. But international alternatives to Hollywood will also be discussed, from the unique forms of Japanese cinema to movements like Italian Neo-realism and the beginnings of the New Wave in France. Film style, from the classical scene break down to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting) will form the center of the course, while attention will also be paid to the development of a film culture. Texts will include Bordwell and Thompson, Film History: An Introduction, and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, Godard and others. Screenings will include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

Performance Theory

48700
ANTH 53100, CMLT, GNDR 41900, GRMN 47700
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
D. Levin and D. Rutherford

This graduate seminar will seek to explore the burgeoning field of performance theory, examining some of its foundational statements (e.g., J. L. Austin, J. Derrida, R. Schechner) and some more recent practical applications and theoretical elaborations (e.g., E. Diamond, R. Morris, P. Phelan, J. Roach). We will be shuttling between two questions: what does recent work in cultural (e.g., semiotic, psychoanalytic, gender) theory bring to the study of theater? What insights might an exploration of the particular theoretical problems involved in the study of theater bring to cultural analysis more generally? Readings will be supplemented by screenings and, if possible and desirable, forays to Chicago theaters.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of Instructor

Seminar: A Separate Cinema: Race Films in Context

64500
ENGL 58900
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
J. Stewart

This course examines race films in their broad cultural context. From the mid-1910s to the early 1950s, African Americans produced and supported a "race film" industry, in which black-cast films were distributed to segregated African American audiences across the country. These films speak to a wide range of social, economic and political issues facing African American communities prior to the civil rights movement. They also share formal and stylistic qualities with other forms of black cultural production (literature, drama, journalism, music, and visual art). This course examines films by pioneering Black directors (Oscar Micheaux, Spencer Williams) as well as the many white-controlled race film companies, in order to trace how this industry competed -- through variation and/or imitation -- with mainstream Hollywood product. How did it participate in the construction of Black stars (e.g., Paul Robeson, Lena Horne, Hattie McDaniel)? How did it relate to Black urban migration, the Harlem Renaissance, and other contemporary movements? How did it attempt to respond to the politics of Black representation and modes of audience address in mainstream films produced during this period? We will think about how numerous institutional, technological and representational developments (e.g., the growth of Hollywood, the coming of sound, uses of blackface) shaped the operations of this independent industry. We will also ENGLage with founding and recent scholarship on race films, their makers, and their audiences (Cripps, Sampson, Bowser & Spence, Green, Gaines).

Seminar: Symbolism and Film

65300
ArtH 49300
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Y. Tsivian

Cinema was born at the time when the Symbolist movement in European literature and art was at its height, and although 'Symbolist cinema' does not exist as a movement in film history, there are things and figures that can be properly understood only when placed against the backdrop of the Baudelairian 'forest of symbols.' We will look at key places and cultural heroes of the Symbolist era (e.g. Salome and Judith; Bruges and St Petersburg), its painters and poets (e.g. Bely, Rodenbach, Khnopff), and trace Symbolist motifs (veils, dead cities, the cult of silence--among others) in films made in Russia, Italy and the U.S.

Seminar: A Voyage to Abyssinia: The Mixed Media of Travel

68800
ARTH 46400
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
B. Stafford

This course will be taught in conjunction with the Field Museum (and primarily at the Field Museum). It will deal with the media of exploration: from notebooks, to photographs, to film, to specimens collected during a specific expedition mounted by the Field Museum early in the 20th century. Ben Williamson of the Field Museum and I will use this case study (and the rich resources of both the Field Museum and the Newberry Library) to think more broadly about the cultural phenomena of collecting and travel.

Politics of Film in 20th Century American History

21200
HIST 18500
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
B. Cumings

This course examines selected themes in 20th-century American political history through both the literature written by historians, and filmic representations by Hollywood and documentary filmmakers. We will read one historical interpretation and view one film on themes like the following: Woodrow Wilson and WW I, the emergence of Pacific Rim cities like Los Angeles, Roosevelt's New Deal, the Japanese-American experience in World War II, McCarthyism and the Korean War, the cold war and the nuclear balance of terror, the radical movements of the 1960s, and multiculturalism in the 1990s.

Staging Femininity: Gender as Spectacle in Opera and Film

22300
CMS 32300, GRMN 23800/33800, MAPH 33500, GNDR 23800, CMLT, MUSI 23800/31900
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
D. Levin

This course will explore the relationship between cultural production and gender identity. We will read a broad range of texts from contemporary cultural, performance, and film theory (e.g. Judith Butler, Catherine Clement, Mary Ann Doane, Susan McClary, Laura Mulvey, Slavoj Zizek) and examine a number of symptomatic films and operas where gender norms become apparent through their exaggeration, violation, or suspension. All readings in English. Films by Josef von Sternberg (The Blue Angel, 1930), Busby Berkeley (The Gang's All Here, 1943), King Vidor (Gilda, 1946), Werner Schroeter (Death of Maria Malibran, 1972) Rainer Werner Fassbinder (Lili Marleen, 1980), and Jean-Jacques Beineix (Diva, 1982); operas by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Marriage of Figaro), Gaetano Donizetti (Lucia di Lammermoor), and Giacomo Puccini (Turandot).

The Divided HeavenThe Divided Heaven: The 1960s in West Germany and the German Democratic Republic

22700
CMST 32700, CMLT, GRMN 23700/41400, GSHU 21200/31200
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
K. Trumpener

Knowledge of German required The building of the Berlin Wall in 1961 cemented the divison of Germany but it also, paradoxically, catalyzed a period of aesthetic experimentation and political ferment in West Germany and in the GDR. Beginning with the differing accounts of l961 produced on either side of the Wall, this course compares the cultural life of both Germanies, as manifested in literature and in film. Our focus is at once on aesthetic questions (late modernism, New Waves, the relationship between avant-garde and documentary impulses) and artistic attempts to process social and policial developments (the generation gap: the new, divided topography of Berlin; the Auschwitz trials, new discussions of fascism and stalinism; the student and feminist movements).

Classical French Cinema

23400
CMST 33400, FREN 23400/33400
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
N. Herpe

Classic French cinema (from the earliest filmmakers to the beginnings of the New Wave) will be studied through the examples of ten movies, which influenced its history and represented the development of an esthetical movement: the French school before 1914 (Louis Feuillade's Fantômas), the "avant-garde" of the 20s (Jean Epstein's La Chute de la maison Usher), the surrealist cinema (Luis Buñuel's L'Age d'or), the musical comedy (Rene Clair's Le Million), the "100% talking" film (Sacha Guitry's Le Roman d'un tricheur), the poetic realism (Jean Renoir's La Bête humaine, Marcel Carne Le Jour se lève), the cinema under the Occupation (Henri-Georges Clouzot's Le Corbeau), the evocation of the Belle Epoque (Max Ophuls' Le Plaisir), the revival of the literary adaptation (Robert Bresson's Journal d'un cure de campagne.

Magic and the Cinema

25600
CMST 35600, ARTH 29700/39700
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
T. Gunning

This course will trace relations between motion pictures and traditions of magic, both as a theatrical entertainment and as a belief system. The invention of cinema's roots in the magic lantern and other "philosophical toys" which trick the senses into seeing visual illusions will be explored in relation to traditions of "Natural Magic" as well as a secularization of magical practices into entertainment from the Renaissance on. The early trick films of Méliès and others will be discussed in relation to the tradition of stage magic in the 19th century, as well as a particular reception of the magical nature of new technologies (electricity, photography, sound recording). The relation between cinema and hypnosis, both as a social concern and as metapsychological description of spectatorship will also be explored. A consideration of the appeal of magic systems of thought (spiritualism, theosophy, ritual magic) for Avant-Garde movement and their relation to experimental films by Epstein, Artaud, Deren, Anger, Smith, Fischinger, and others.

Advanced Photography

27700
CMST 37700, COVA 27800
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
L. Letinsky

COVA 101 or 102, and 240 or 241, or consent of instructor. Throughout the quarter, students concentrate on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed towards the production of a cohesive body of either color or black-and-white photographs. An investigation of contemporary and historic photographic issues informs the students' photographic practice and includes visits to local exhibitions, critical readings, darkroom techniques, and class and individual critiques. Lab fee $40.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Staging Femininity: Gender as Spectacle in Opera and Film

32300
CMS 32300, GRMN 23800/33800, MAPH 33500, GNDR 23800, CMLT, MUSI 23800/31900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
D. Levin

This course will explore the relationship between cultural production and gender identity. We will read a broad range of texts from contemporary cultural, performance, and film theory (e.g. Judith Butler, Catherine Clement, Mary Ann Doane, Susan McClary, Laura Mulvey, Slavoj Zizek) and examine a number of symptomatic films and operas where gender norms become apparent through their exaggeration, violation, or suspension. All readings in English. Films by Josef von Sternberg (The Blue Angel, 1930), Busby Berkeley (The Gang's All Here, 1943), King Vidor (Gilda, 1946), Werner Schroeter (Death of Maria Malibran, 1972) Rainer Werner Fassbinder (Lili Marleen, 1980), and Jean-Jacques Beineix (Diva, 1982); operas by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Marriage of Figaro), Gaetano Donizetti (Lucia di Lammermoor), and Giacomo Puccini (Turandot).

The Divided HeavenThe Divided Heaven: The 1960s in West Germany and the German Democratic Republic

32700
CMST 22700, CMLT, GRMN 23700/41400, GSHU 21200/31200
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
K. Trumpener

Knowledge of German required The building of the Berlin Wall in 1961 cemented the divison of Germany but it also, paradoxically, catalyzed a period of aesthetic experimentation and political ferment in West Germany and in the GDR. Beginning with the differing accounts of l961 produced on either side of the Wall, this course compares the cultural life of both Germanies, as manifested in literature and in film. Our focus is at once on aesthetic questions (late modernism, New Waves, the relationship between avant-garde and documentary impulses) and artistic attempts to process social and policial developments (the generation gap: the new, divided topography of Berlin; the Auschwitz trials, new discussions of fascism and stalinism; the student and feminist movements).

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