Courses

Brechtian Representations: Theatre, Theory, Cinema

46200
ENGL 44500, CMLT 40500, GRMN 32900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
L. Kruger

This course will examine the contribution of Brecht, the most influential playwright of the twentieth century and its principal theatre theorist, to the practice and theory of theatre and cinema. We will pay particular attention to the relationships between theory and practice in Brecht's own work so as to clarify the use and significance of terms that are both concepts and techniques - epic theatre, Verfremdung, gest, historicizing, refunctioning the apparatus, and teh formation of the critical audience - and go on to consider the influence (and refunctioning) of Brechtian theory and practice in the more recent work of playwrights (Heiner MŸller, Peter Weiss,RW Fassbinder, Edward Bond, Athol Fugard, ...), film-makers (Jean-Luc Godard, Alexander Kluge, Fassbinder, Djibril Diop Mambety ...), and cultural theorists (Barthes, Adorno, ...)

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
Staff

Consent of instructor

Problematics in Asian Cinema: City & Speed in Asian Cinema

64400
JAPN 44800
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
J. Hall

Undergraduates may register only with consent of the instructor The course examines relations between the city, cinematic apparatus, and affects of modernity in Asian cinemas. Hyperbole, displacement, commodity, anonymity, loss, fetish, and speed are among the tropes of urban life that we examine within, and as a product of, Asian cinemas of the modern. Wartime Shanghai, imperial Tokyo, mid-century Bombay, late-century Hong-Kong --we examine the familiar and foreign Asian city as site of cinematic production and consumption in the local, national, and global contexts of various Asian cinemas.

Problems in 19th Century Photographic History

67500
ARTH 46900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
J. Snyder

Historiography

69000
ENGL 68500
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
J. Lastra

This research seminar seeks to accomplish two goals: to familiarize students with basic issues associated with the writing of history, especially the history of the cinema, and to serve as a practical introduction to the archival resources and methods of film-historical research. Toward the latter end the class will engage in a collaborative research project, which we will carry out during the quarter. During this process we will discuss how archives are produced and structured, and how they may be used in familiar and unfamiliar ways. Likewise, we will discuss and evaluate different approaches to the writing of film history. In addition to texts devoted to film history by Bazin, Gomery and Allen, Buscombe, Comolli, Bordwell, Altman, Crafton, and Gunning, we will look at broader developments in the writing of history, focusing, in part, on the post-Annales schools of history.

Introduction to Film I

10100
ArtH 19000, COVA 25300, ENGL 10800, GSHU 20000
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
J. Stewart

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

African American Literature on Film

21100
ENGL 27100, AFAM 21100
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
J. Stewart

This course surveys a range of 20th century African American literary works that have been adapted to the screen in order to explore the formal and stylistic relationships between literature and the cinema, and our approaches to them as objects of intellectual inquiry. How are different literary forms, genres and approaches (i.e., novels, plays, autobiography, melodrama, social realism) translated into cinematic terms? What tools of literary analysis can or should we bring to the interpretation of cinematic texts---adaptations and others? How can we think about the "authorship" of an adaptation, particularly when a Black-authored text is re-presented by a white screenwriter or director or "white" production context (e.g., the Hollywood studio system)? How are films with Black literary origins presented to and received by different readers/audiences? We will pay particular attention to the ways in which race complicates issues of production, representation and address between literary and cinematic institutions. Titles we will examine include: novels and films by Oscar Micheaux; Richard Wright/Pierre Chenal/Jerrold Freedman (Native Son); Lorraine Hansberry/Daniel Petrie (A Raisin in the Sun); Chester Himes/Ossie Davis (Cotton Comes to Harlem); Alice Walker/Steven Spielberg (The Color Purple); Malcolm X & Alex Haley/Spike Lee (The Autobiography of Malcolm X); Walter Moseley/Carl Franklin (Devil in a Blue Dress); Julie Dash's film and novel Daughters of the Dust.

Art and Film in Weimar Germany

22100
CMST 32100, ARTH 26000/36000, GRMN 23100/33100
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
R.Heller

The period of the Weimar Republic in Germany, from the end of World War I and the collapse of Imperial Germany in 1918 to the rise to power of Adolf Hitler and Nazism in 1933, was a time of intense economic, social and intellectual turmoil and revolution. It also was witness to Germany's arguably most influential, innovative artistic activity and productivity in the various visual arts and film, as well as literature and music, during the 20th century. This course will explore broadly the visual culture of Weimar Germany, with particular focus on the fine arts and more popular imagery, the intersections with Weimar cinema, and their interactions with the contemporary the social and political milieus. To be considered are such art and film movements as Expressionism, Dada and Neo-Objectivity; artists' groups encompassing the Bauhaus, the November Group and the Association of Revolutionary Visual Artists of Germany; artists ranging from George Grosz and Otto Dix to Kurt Schwitters and Wassily Kandinsky; and films including The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Metropolis, M, and Kuhle Wampe.

Film in India

24100
CMST 34100, ANTH 20600/31000, HIST 26700/36700, SALC 20500/30500
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
R. Inden

Considers the film world from 1975 to the present. Most attention will be paid to the Hindi film and especially to its "peculiar" features, for example, the song and dance. Emphasis is placed on the reconstruction of film-related activities which can be taken as life practices from the stand point of "elites" and "masses," "middle classes," men and women, people in cities and villages, governmental institutions, businesses, and the "nation." The course will rely on people's notions of the everyday, festive days, paradise, arcadia and utopia to pose questions about how people try to realize their wishes and themselves through film. How film practices articulated with nationalism, first in the wake of a failing "socialist pattern of development," and, then, with "liberalization," of the promise or threat "free markets" would bring, will be the major concern. A brief look will also be taken at how film is related to other media such as television. Some comparisons with Hollywood will be made. Students will be asked to familiarize themselves with existing approaches to Indian film against the background of more general approaches to film and the media. Some knowledge of Hindi desirable but not required (films will be subtitled in English and have English synopses). One film per week will be shown. Requirement: One 10-page paper, written in two stages.

Beginning Photography

27600
CMST 37600, COVA 24000
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
L. Brown

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

History of International Cinema, Part I, Silent Era

28500
CMST 48500, ArtH 28500/38500, ENGL 29300/48700, MAPH 33600
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
Y. Tsivian

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Introduction to Video and Film

28900
COVA 10500, GSHU 20300
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
Staff

COVA 101 or 102, or CMS 101 This course is a hands-on production course dealing with basic techniques and concepts of composition, editing, lighting, and story telling through images. Through exercises, screenings, discussions, and critiques, students will explore experimental, narrative and documentary video and filmmaking. Students must have a video camera.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Art and Film in Weimar Germany

32100
CMST 22100, ARTH 26000/36000, GRMN 23100/33100
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
R. Heller

The period of the Weimar Republic in Germany, from the end of World War I and the collapse of Imperial Germany in 1918 to the rise to power of Adolf Hitler and Nazism in 1933, was a time of intense economic, social and intellectual turmoil and revolution.

Film in India

34100
CMST 24100, Anth 20600/31100, Hist 26700/36700, SALC 20500/30500
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
R. Inden

Considers the film world from 1975 to the present. Most attention will be paid to the Hindi film and especially to its "peculiar" features, for example, the song and dance. Emphasis is placed on the reconstruction of film-related activities which can be taken as life practices from the stand point of "elites" and "masses," "middle classes," men and women, people in cities and villages, governmental institutions, businesses, and the "nation." The course will rely on people's notions of the everyday, festive days, paradise, arcadia and utopia to pose questions about how people try to realize their wishes and themselves through film. How film practices articulated with nationalism, first in the wake of a failing "socialist pattern of development," and, then, with "liberalization," of the promise or threat "free markets" would bring, will be the major concern. A brief look will also be taken at how film is related to other media such as television. Some comparisons with Hollywood will be made. Students will be asked to familiarize themselves with existing approaches to Indian film against the background of more general approaches to film and the media. Some knowledge of Hindi desirable but not required (films will be subtitled in English and have English synopses). One film per week will be shown. Requirement: One 10-page paper, written in two stages.

Beginning Photography

37600
CMST 27600, COVA 24000
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
L. Brown

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Methods and Issues in Cinema Studies

40000
ArtH 39900, ENGL 48000, MAPH 33000
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
T. Gunning

This course offers an introduction to ways of reading, writing on, and teaching film. The focus of discussion will range from methods of close analysis and basic concepts of film form, technique and style; through industrial/critical categories of genre and authorship (studios, stars, directors); through aspects of the cinema as a social institution, psycho-sexual apparatus and cultural practice; to the relationship between filmic texts and the historical horizon of production and reception. Films discussed will include works by Griffith, Lang, Hitchcock, Deren, Godard.

History of International Cinema, Part I, Silent Era

48500
CMST 28500, ARTH 28500/38500, ENGL 29300/48700, MAPH 33600
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
Y. Tsivian

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of Instructor

Seminar: Drama, Theatre, Image, Performance

62200
ENGL 59300, CMLT 42600
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2001-2002
L. Kruger

This PhD intensive reading course examines theoretical texts that deal with the interdisciplinary issues arising out of the confluence and conflict of word, image, and performance in various cultural contexts. Central concerns will include dramatic action, theatricality, visual and aural representation, and the competing phenomenologies of audience experiences of performance and cinema/video. We will be looking closely at the nature of drama and theatre, the mediation of performance through cinema and video, and the ways in which drama and theatricality manifest themselves in cultural activity more broadly. We will also scrutinize the ways on which metaphors of theatricality and performativity have been appropriated by other disciplines. Requirements: ACTIVE class participation; two presentations (P/F) and a short position paper (grade).

Religion and Modernity in Film

24300
CMST 34300, ANTH 21900/32400, HIST 26800/36800
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
R. Inden

Considers the problem of how popular films in the US, Europe, and Asia have represented the conventional religions' relation to modernity: the idea of film practices ("youth culture") as constituting a secular religion alternative or antagonistic to the conventional religions and the recuperation and transformation of conventional religiosity in modernist, especially patriotic and science-fiction films as a national theology ("civil religion"). One to two films per week will be shown. Requirement: One 10-page paper, written in two stages.

Women and New China Cinema

25400
CMST 35400, CHIN 25400/35400, EALC 25400
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Xiaobing Tang

In this course we will study the representation of women in a series of films from different stages of New China cinema. Specifically we will examine a collection of "rural films" (such as Li Shuangshuang and Ermo) in which the transformation of a female character constitutes the central action. We will explore questions of a film genre, quotations, subjectivity and the projection of desire. All readings in English.

Charlie Chaplin: The Man, the Artist, the Cultural Hero

26400
CMST 36400, ARTH 28900/38900
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Y. Tsivian

The three aspects stressed in the course title define the approach to (and explain the significance of) this key figure in the history of film and twentieth-century culture. As a man, Chaplin was a frequent target of large-scale political and sexual scandals; as an actor-director he was not only responsible for the Tramp figure, but also for such genres as social-comedy and comedy-melodrama; as a myth, Chaplin's figure was key to a number of twentieth-century art movements, such as Expressionist poetry, Cubist painting, and Soviet Constructivist art.

Film Aesthetics, Spectatorship, and Cinema Experience

27100
ENGL 28000, GSHU 20700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
M. Hansen

This course focuses on the relation between the film medium, its aesthetic possibilities and practices, and the forms of reception mandated by and available within the institution of cinema. Beginning with a few classical film theorists (Balazs, Kracauer, Eisenstein, Benjamin), we will explore questions of film aesthetics and spectatorship through more contemporary theorists in the psychoanalytic-semiotic vein (Metz, Baudry, Mulvey) as well as from the perspective of recent film history (Gunning, Musser, Tsivian, Carbine, Hansen) which emphasizes the significance of the entire cinema experience - the social space of the theater, music, programming, the public horizon of the audience - for the process by which films convey meaning, pleasure, and subjectivity.

Slavic Critical Theory from Jakobsen to Zizek

27200
CMST 37200, BALT 28500/38500, GSHU 21300/31300
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
M. Sternstein

This seminar style course surveys the cultural and literary theory of critics including Roman Jakobson, the Russian Formalists, Jan Mukarovsky, the Prague School, Mikhail Bakhtin, Tzvetan Todorov, Julie Kristeva, Mikhail Epstein, Slavoj Zizek and the Slovenian Lacanians.

Beginning Photography

27600
CMST 37600, COVA 24000
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Theories of Media

27800
CMST 37800, ARTH 25800/35800, COVA 25400, ENGL 12600/32600
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
W.J.T. Mitchell

This course explores the fundamental questions in the interdisciplinary study of visual culture: What are the cultural (and by the same token, natural) components in the structure of visual experience? What is seeing? What is a spectator? What is the difference between visual and verbal representation? How do visual media exert power, elicit desire and pleasure, and construct the boundaries of subjective and social experience in the private and public spheres? How do questions of politics, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity inflect the construction of visual semiosis?

History of International Cinema, Part II, Sound Cinema to 1960

28600
CMS 48600, ARTH 28600/38600, ENGL 29600/48900, MAPH 33700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
T. Gunning

This is the second part of the international survey history of film covering the sound era up to 1960. It is strongly recommended that students take the first section first. This survey will deal with issues of film form, industry organization and film culture during three decades, focusing on the crystallization of the Classical Hollywood Film as a key issue. But international alternatives to Hollywood will also be discussed, from the unique forms of Japanese cinema to movements like Italian Neo-realism and the beginnings of the New Wave in France. Film style, from the classical scene break down to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting) will form the center of the course, while attention will also be paid to the development of a film culture. Texts will include Bordwell and Thompson, Film History: An Introduction, and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, Godard and others. Screenings will include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Classical French Cinema

33400
CMST 23400, FREN 23400/33400
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
N. Herpe

Classic French cinema (from the earliest filmmakers to the beginnings of the New Wave) will be studied through the examples of ten movies, which influenced its history and represented the development of an esthetical movement: the French school before 1914 (Louis Feuillade's Fantômas), the "avant-garde" of the 20s (Jean Epstein's La Chute de la maison Usher), the surrealist cinema (Luis Buñuel's L'Age d'or), the musical comedy (Rene Clair's Le Million), the "100% talking" film (Sacha Guitry's Le Roman d'un tricheur), the poetic realism (Jean Renoir's La Bête humaine, Marcel Carne Le Jour se lève), the cinema under the Occupation (Henri-Georges Clouzot's Le Corbeau), the evocation of the Belle Epoque (Max Ophuls' Le Plaisir), the revival of the literary adaptation (Robert Bresson's Journal d'un cure de campagne.

Religion and Modernity in Film

34300
CMST 24300, ANTH 21900/32400, HIST 26800/36800
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
R. Inden

Considers the problem of how popular films in the US, Europe, and Asia have represented the conventional religions' relation to modernity: the idea of film practices ("youth culture") as constituting a secular religion alternative or antagonistic to the conventional religions and the recuperation and transformation of conventional religiosity in modernist, especially patriotic and science-fiction films as a national theology ("civil religion"). One to two films per week will be shown. Requirement: One 10-page paper, written in two stages.

Women and New China Cinema

35400
CMST 25400, CHIN 25400/35400, EALC 25004
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Xiaobing Tang

In this course we will study the representation of women in a series of films from different stages of New China cinema. Specifically we will examine a collection of "rural films" (such as Li Shuangshuang and Ermo) in which the transformation of a female character constitutes the central action. We will explore questions of a film genre, quotations, subjectivity and the projection of desire. All readings in English.

Charlie Chaplin: The Man, the Artist, the Cultural Hero

36400
CMST 26400, ARTH 28900/38900
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
Y. Tsivian

The three aspects stressed in the course title define the approach to (and explain the significance of) this key figure in the history of film and twentieth-century culture. As a man, Chaplin was a frequent target of large-scale political and sexual scandals; as an actor-director he was not only responsible for the Tramp figure, but also for such genres as social-comedy and comedy-melodrama; as a myth, Chaplin's figure was key to a number of twentieth-century art movements, such as Expressionist poetry, Cubist painting, and Soviet Constructivist art.

Slavic Critical Theory from Jakobsen to Zizek

37200
CMST 27200, BALT 28500/38500, GSHU 21300/31300
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
M. Sternstein

This seminar style course surveys the cultural and literary theory of critics including Roman Jakobson, the Russian Formalists, Jan Mukarovsky, the Prague School, Mikhail Bakhtin, Tzvetan Todorov, Julie Kristeva, Mikhail Epstein, Slavoj Zizek and the Slovenian Lacanians.

Beginning Photography

37600
CMST 27600, COVA 24000
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Theories of Media

37800
CMST 27800, ARTH 26000/36000, COVA 25400, ENGL 12800/32800, MPAH 33000
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
W.J.T. Mitchell

This course explores the fundamental questions in the interdisciplinary study of visual culture: What are the cultural (and by the same token, natural) components in the structure of visual experience? What is seeing? What is a spectator? What is the difference between visual and verbal representation? How do visual media exert power, elicit desire and pleasure, and construct the boundaries of subjective and social experience in the private and public spheres? How do questions of politics, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity inflect the construction of visual semiosis?

History of International Cinema, Part II, Sound Cinema to 1960

48600
CMS 28600, ArtH 28600/38600, ENGL 29600/48900, MAPH 33700
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
T. Gunning

This is the second part of the international survey history of film covering the sound era up to 1960. It is strongly recommended that students take the first section first. This survey will deal with issues of film form, industry organization and film culture during three decades, focusing on the crystallization of the Classical Hollywood Film as a key issue. But international alternatives to Hollywood will also be discussed, from the unique forms of Japanese cinema to movements like Italian Neo-realism and the beginnings of the New Wave in France. Film style, from the classical scene break down to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting) will form the center of the course, while attention will also be paid to the development of a film culture. Texts will include Bordwell and Thompson, Film History: An Introduction, and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, Godard and others. Screenings will include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

Performance Theory

48700
ANTH 53100, CMLT, GNDR 41900, GRMN 47700
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2001-2002
D. Levin and D. Rutherford

This graduate seminar will seek to explore the burgeoning field of performance theory, examining some of its foundational statements (e.g., J. L. Austin, J. Derrida, R. Schechner) and some more recent practical applications and theoretical elaborations (e.g., E. Diamond, R. Morris, P. Phelan, J. Roach). We will be shuttling between two questions: what does recent work in cultural (e.g., semiotic, psychoanalytic, gender) theory bring to the study of theater? What insights might an exploration of the particular theoretical problems involved in the study of theater bring to cultural analysis more generally? Readings will be supplemented by screenings and, if possible and desirable, forays to Chicago theaters.

Pages