Courses

Politics of Film in 20th Century American History

21200
HIST 18500
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
B. Cumings

This course examines selected themes in 20th-century American political history through both the literature written by historians, and filmic representations by Hollywood and documentary filmmakers. We will read one historical interpretation and view one film on themes like the following: Woodrow Wilson and WW I, the emergence of Pacific Rim cities like Los Angeles, Roosevelt's New Deal, the Japanese-American experience in World War II, McCarthyism and the Korean War, the cold war and the nuclear balance of terror, the radical movements of the 1960s, and multiculturalism in the 1990s.

Staging Femininity: Gender as Spectacle in Opera and Film

22300
CMS 32300, GRMN 23800/33800, MAPH 33500, GNDR 23800, CMLT, MUSI 23800/31900
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
D. Levin

This course will explore the relationship between cultural production and gender identity. We will read a broad range of texts from contemporary cultural, performance, and film theory (e.g. Judith Butler, Catherine Clement, Mary Ann Doane, Susan McClary, Laura Mulvey, Slavoj Zizek) and examine a number of symptomatic films and operas where gender norms become apparent through their exaggeration, violation, or suspension. All readings in English. Films by Josef von Sternberg (The Blue Angel, 1930), Busby Berkeley (The Gang's All Here, 1943), King Vidor (Gilda, 1946), Werner Schroeter (Death of Maria Malibran, 1972) Rainer Werner Fassbinder (Lili Marleen, 1980), and Jean-Jacques Beineix (Diva, 1982); operas by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Marriage of Figaro), Gaetano Donizetti (Lucia di Lammermoor), and Giacomo Puccini (Turandot).

The Divided HeavenThe Divided Heaven: The 1960s in West Germany and the German Democratic Republic

22700
CMST 32700, CMLT, GRMN 23700/41400, GSHU 21200/31200
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
K. Trumpener

Knowledge of German required The building of the Berlin Wall in 1961 cemented the divison of Germany but it also, paradoxically, catalyzed a period of aesthetic experimentation and political ferment in West Germany and in the GDR. Beginning with the differing accounts of l961 produced on either side of the Wall, this course compares the cultural life of both Germanies, as manifested in literature and in film. Our focus is at once on aesthetic questions (late modernism, New Waves, the relationship between avant-garde and documentary impulses) and artistic attempts to process social and policial developments (the generation gap: the new, divided topography of Berlin; the Auschwitz trials, new discussions of fascism and stalinism; the student and feminist movements).

Classical French Cinema

23400
CMST 33400, FREN 23400/33400
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
N. Herpe

Classic French cinema (from the earliest filmmakers to the beginnings of the New Wave) will be studied through the examples of ten movies, which influenced its history and represented the development of an esthetical movement: the French school before 1914 (Louis Feuillade's Fantômas), the "avant-garde" of the 20s (Jean Epstein's La Chute de la maison Usher), the surrealist cinema (Luis Buñuel's L'Age d'or), the musical comedy (Rene Clair's Le Million), the "100% talking" film (Sacha Guitry's Le Roman d'un tricheur), the poetic realism (Jean Renoir's La Bête humaine, Marcel Carne Le Jour se lève), the cinema under the Occupation (Henri-Georges Clouzot's Le Corbeau), the evocation of the Belle Epoque (Max Ophuls' Le Plaisir), the revival of the literary adaptation (Robert Bresson's Journal d'un cure de campagne.

Magic and the Cinema

25600
CMST 35600, ARTH 29700/39700
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
T. Gunning

This course will trace relations between motion pictures and traditions of magic, both as a theatrical entertainment and as a belief system. The invention of cinema's roots in the magic lantern and other "philosophical toys" which trick the senses into seeing visual illusions will be explored in relation to traditions of "Natural Magic" as well as a secularization of magical practices into entertainment from the Renaissance on. The early trick films of Méliès and others will be discussed in relation to the tradition of stage magic in the 19th century, as well as a particular reception of the magical nature of new technologies (electricity, photography, sound recording). The relation between cinema and hypnosis, both as a social concern and as metapsychological description of spectatorship will also be explored. A consideration of the appeal of magic systems of thought (spiritualism, theosophy, ritual magic) for Avant-Garde movement and their relation to experimental films by Epstein, Artaud, Deren, Anger, Smith, Fischinger, and others.

Advanced Photography

27700
CMST 37700, COVA 27800
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
L. Letinsky

COVA 101 or 102, and 240 or 241, or consent of instructor. Throughout the quarter, students concentrate on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed towards the production of a cohesive body of either color or black-and-white photographs. An investigation of contemporary and historic photographic issues informs the students' photographic practice and includes visits to local exhibitions, critical readings, darkroom techniques, and class and individual critiques. Lab fee $40.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Staging Femininity: Gender as Spectacle in Opera and Film

32300
CMS 32300, GRMN 23800/33800, MAPH 33500, GNDR 23800, CMLT, MUSI 23800/31900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
D. Levin

This course will explore the relationship between cultural production and gender identity. We will read a broad range of texts from contemporary cultural, performance, and film theory (e.g. Judith Butler, Catherine Clement, Mary Ann Doane, Susan McClary, Laura Mulvey, Slavoj Zizek) and examine a number of symptomatic films and operas where gender norms become apparent through their exaggeration, violation, or suspension. All readings in English. Films by Josef von Sternberg (The Blue Angel, 1930), Busby Berkeley (The Gang's All Here, 1943), King Vidor (Gilda, 1946), Werner Schroeter (Death of Maria Malibran, 1972) Rainer Werner Fassbinder (Lili Marleen, 1980), and Jean-Jacques Beineix (Diva, 1982); operas by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Marriage of Figaro), Gaetano Donizetti (Lucia di Lammermoor), and Giacomo Puccini (Turandot).

The Divided HeavenThe Divided Heaven: The 1960s in West Germany and the German Democratic Republic

32700
CMST 22700, CMLT, GRMN 23700/41400, GSHU 21200/31200
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
K. Trumpener

Knowledge of German required The building of the Berlin Wall in 1961 cemented the divison of Germany but it also, paradoxically, catalyzed a period of aesthetic experimentation and political ferment in West Germany and in the GDR. Beginning with the differing accounts of l961 produced on either side of the Wall, this course compares the cultural life of both Germanies, as manifested in literature and in film. Our focus is at once on aesthetic questions (late modernism, New Waves, the relationship between avant-garde and documentary impulses) and artistic attempts to process social and policial developments (the generation gap: the new, divided topography of Berlin; the Auschwitz trials, new discussions of fascism and stalinism; the student and feminist movements).

Magic and the Cinema

35600
CMST 25600, ARTH 29700/39700
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
T. Gunning

This course will trace relations between motion pictures and traditions of magic, both as a theatrical entertainment and as a belief system. The invention of cinema's roots in the magic lantern and other "philosophical toys" which trick the senses into seeing visual illusions will be explored in relation to traditions of "Natural Magic" as well as a secularization of magical practices into entertainment from the Renaissance on. The early trick films of Méliès and others will be discussed in relation to the tradition of stage magic in the 19th century, as well as a particular reception of the magical nature of new technologies (electricity, photography, sound recording). The relation between cinema and hypnosis, both as a social concern and as metapsychological description of spectatorship will also be explored. A consideration of the appeal of magic systems of thought (spiritualism, theosophy, ritual magic) for Avant-Garde movement and their relation to experimental films by Epstein, Artaud, Deren, Anger, Smith, Fischinger, and others.

Beginning Photography

37600
CMST 27600, COVA 24000
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Advanced Photography

37700
CMST 27700, COVA 27800
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
L. Letinsky

COVA 101 or 102, and 240 or 241, or consent of instructor. Throughout the quarter, students concentrate on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed towards the production of a cohesive body of either color or black-and-white photographs. An investigation of contemporary and historic photographic issues informs the students' photographic practice and includes visits to local exhibitions, critical readings, darkroom techniques, and class and individual critiques. Lab fee $40.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
Staff

Consent of Instructor

Seminar: The Films of Robert Bresson

63800
FREN 36300
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
N. Herpe

Robert Bresson's work will mainly be studied through its relationship with the literature, from his collaboration with Giraudoux and Cocteau until his more and more personal adaptations of novels by Bernanos or Dostoievski. We'll also try to set his career back in its historical context which made him after 1945 the prophet of a new classicism, and in the same time one of the most innovative pioneers of a modern cinema.

Seminar: The Persistence of Surrealism: Buñuel and Beyond

66200
ENGL 68700
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
J. Lastra

Surrealism marked a watershed moment in modern intellectual history. In addition to its familiar aesthetic achievements, it also laid the intellectual groundwork for much of contemporary French, and by extension American, critical thought. From the French confrontation with Hegel in the 1930s, which set the stage for Breton's Hegelian understanding of Surrealism's project and Bataille's critique, to the cultentrate on analyzing Buñuel's characteristic visual, aural, and narrative strategies. Beyond that, we will situate his films in relevant aesthetic, cultural, political, and national contexts in an attempt to understand how a career that spans five decades and as many countries can both retain its own internal coherence and yet participate meaningfully in disparate and often incompatible arenas.

Seminar: Classical Cinema as Vernacular Modernism

67300
ENGL 58700
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2001-2002
M. Hansen

This course proceeds from the ostensible contradiction that Hollywood cinema at its most "classical," roughly from the late teens through the fifties, was also perceived, all over the world, as an incarnation of "the modern." We will begin with accounts of cinematic classicality in film history and criticism (Brasillach/Bardeche, Bazin), psychoanalytic-semiotic film theory (Metz, Bellour, Heath, Mulvey), as well as neoformalist-cognitivist approaches (Bordwell,Thompson, Carroll). We will look at films that both meet and exceed their categorization as classical and might more productively be described as a form of "vernacular modernism"---as aesthetic expressions of, and responses to, the social, psychic, and cultural experience of modernity and modernization. Drawing on texts by Kracauer, Benjamin, Epstein, Dulac, Colette, Woolf et al., we will consider the formal, stylistic, and thematic ways in which these films articulate a material sense of the everyday, a new image world, a restructuration of sensory perception, subjectivity, and cultural reception. Intensive reading course, research paper optional.

Introduction to Film I

10100
ArtH 190, CMS 101, COVA 253, ENGL 108, GS Hum 200
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2000-2001
J. Stewart

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The first part introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

(Re)Defining African American Cinema

21000
AfAfAm 214, ENGL 279
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2000-2001
J. Stewart

This course examines African American cinema from the 1910’s to the present in order to think about the question: What is a Black film? Must a film be produced by Blacks, feature a Black cast, or primarily address a Black audience in order to be classified as an "African American film"? Is there a discernable Black film aesthetics? Can a Black film be produced within the Hollywood studio system? How important are theses distinctions? Focusing on films directed, written and/or produced by African Americans, we will discuss how Black American cinema has been defined and redefined in relation to Hollywood and independent filmmaking traditions.

Religion and Modernity in Film

24300
CMST 343, Anth, Hist
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2000-2001
R. Inden

Considers the problem of how popular films in the US, India, and Europe have represented the conventional religions relation to modernity: the idea of film practices ("youth culture") as constituting a secular religion alternative or antagonistic to the conventional religions and the recuperation and transformation of conventional religiosity in modernist, especially patriotic and science-fiction films as a national theology ("civil religion").

Beginning Photography

27600
CMST 376, COVA 240
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2000-2001
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student’s understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

History of History of International Cinema, Part I, Silent Era

28500
CMST 485, ArtH 285/385, ENGL 293/487, MAPH 336
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2000-2001
Y. Tsivian

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2000-2001
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies:Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Religion and Modernity in Film

34300
CMST 24300, ANTH 21900/32400, HIST 26800/36800
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2000-2001
R. Inden

Considers the problem of how popular films in the US, India, and Europe have represented the conventional religions relation to modernity: the idea of film practices ("youth culture") as constituting a secular religion alternative or antagonistic to the conventional religions and the recuperation and transformation of conventional religiosity in modernist, especially patriotic and science-fiction films as a national theology ("civil religion").

East/Central European Avant-garde

35100
CMST 251, ArtH 255/355, GnSlav 284/384, GsHum 280/380
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2000-2001
M. Sternstein

Knowledge of one of the languages of the region (including French or German) The avant-gardes of the "other" Europe are the mainstay of this course which focuses especially, but not exclusively, on the interwar avant-gardes of Austria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovenia, and Yugoslavia. A comparative framework will be employed whenever lucrative to comprehend the East/Central European movements in the wider context of the European avant-garde. The course also traces the development and legacy (political, artistic) of these avant-gardes in their contemporary scenes. Plastic, verbal and performative arts (including film) are studied.

Beginning Photography

37600
CMST 276, COVA 240
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2000-2001
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student’s understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Methods and Issues in Cinema Studies

40000
ArtH 399, ENGL 480, MAPH 330
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2000-2001
T. Gunning

This course offers an introduction to ways of reading, writing on, and teaching film. The focus of discussion will range from methods of close analysis and basic concepts of film form, technique and style; through industrial/critical categories of genre and authorship (studios, stars, directors); through aspects of the cinema as a social institution, psycho-sexual apparatus and cultural practice; to the relationship between filmic texts and the historical horizon of production and reception. Films discussed will include works by Griffith, Lang, Hitchcock, Deren, Godard.

History of International Cinema, Part I, Silent Era

48500
CMST 285, ArtH 285/385, ENGL 293/487, MAPH 336
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2000-2001
Y. Tsivian

This is the first part of a two-quarter course:The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Italian Cinema

23300
Italian 217
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
F. Nasi

Through the analysis of a number of films produced in the last decade, the course will offer both a survey on major recent Italian directors (such as Amelio, Archibugi, Benigni, Ferrario, Martone, Mazzacurati, Moretti, Lucchetti, Ligabue, Salvatores, Soldini etc.) and a description of Italian contemporary civilization and culture. Italy as a land of new immigration, the problems of the last generation, the political and cultural tendency toward regionalism and secessionism on one side and Europe on the other, will be among the main topics taken into account. The films will be analyzed from a thematic, technical and linguistic point of view. A close scrutiny of references of the new Italian cinema to masters of Italian cinematic tradition such as Rossellini, Fellini, Pasolini is also one of the objectives of the course. Classes will be held in Italian.

Film in India

24100
CMST 341, Anth 206/31, Hist 267/367, SALC 205/305
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
R. Inden

Considers the film world from just before Independence (1947) down to the present. Most attention will be paid to the Hindi film, especially to its "peculiar" features, for example, the song and dance. Emphasis is placed on reconstruction of film-related activities that can be taken as life practices from the standpoint of "elites" and "masses," "middle classes," men and women, people in cities and villages, governmental institutions, businesses, and the "nation." The course will rely on people’s notions of the everyday, festive days, paradise, arcadia and utopia to pose questions about how people try to realize their wishes and themselves through film. How film practices articulated with colonialism, nationalism, "socialist development," and, now, "free markets" will be a major concern. Students will be asked to familiarize themselves with existing approaches to Indian film against the background of more general approaches to film and the media. Some knowledge of Hindi desirable but not required (most films will be subtitled in English and have English synopses).

Modernity and the Sense of Things

27400
CMST 474, ENGL 292/692, GendSt 292
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
B. Brown and M. Hansen

This course will ENGLage the discourse of modernity as an account of the subject/object relation that foregrounds, on the one hand, the history of the senses, and, on the other, the fate of "things." Modernity has come to name a mode of experience: experience of the disembedding of social relations as of traditional definitions of gender and sexuality, the changed fabric of built space and everyday life, the emergence of technical media like photography and film, the promises of mass consumption. Within this experience of modernity, what happens to the definition of experience itself? How do mechanization, marketing, advertising, the glamorization of commodities change the character of "things"? And how does the changed character of "things" alter structures of perception and subjectivity? What are the real losses entailed by these transformations, what are the possibilities that have yet to be realized? The course will begin with classic sociological accounts of modernity in work by Simmel, Weber, Veblen, Lukács. We will then track some key problems through accounts of the material, cultural and sensory manifestations of modernity, with a particular focus on how the cinema was seen to crystallize the changed experience of things and people. This will include work by Giedion, Kracauer, Benjamin, Mumford, Stein, Gorky, Epstein, Woolf, Barnes, Heidegger.

Beginning Photography

27600
CMST 376, COVA 240
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student’s understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Advanced Photography

27700
CMST 377, COVA 278
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
L. Letinsky

COVA 101 or 102, and 240 or 241, or consent of instructor Throughout the quarter, students concentrate on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed towards the production of a cohesive body of either color or black-and-white photographs. An investigation of contemporary and historic photographic issues informs the students’ photographic practice and includes visits to local exhibitions, critical readings, darkroom techniques, and class and individual critiques. Lab fee $40.

History of International Cinema, Part II, Sound Cinema to 1960

28600
CMS 486, ArtH 286/386, ENGL 296/489, MAPH 337
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
T. Gunning

This is the second part of the international survey history of film covering the sound era up to 1960. It is strongly recommended that students take the first section first This survey will deal with issues of film form, industry organization and film culture during three decades, focusing on the crystallization of the Classical Hollywood Film as a key issue. But international alternatives to Hollywood will also be discussed, from the unique forms of Japanese cinema to movements like Italian Neo-realism and the beginnings of the New Wave in France. Film style, from the classical scene break down to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting) will form the center of the course, while attention will also be paid to the development of a film culture. Texts will include Bordwell and Thompson,Film History: An Introduction, and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, Godard and others. Screenings will include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies:Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Le Cinéma Classique en France

33400
French 382
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
N. Herpe

Classic French cinema (from the earliest filmmakers to the beginnings of the New Wave) will be studied through the examples of ten movies, which influenced its history and represented the development of an esthetical movement: the French school before 1914 (Louis Feuillade’s "Fantômas"), the "avant-garde" of the 20s (Jean Epstein’s "La Chute de la maison Usher"), the surrealist cinema (Luis Buñuel’s "L’Age d’or"), the musical comedy (Rene Clair’s "Le Million"), the "100% talking" film (Sacha Guitry’s "Le Roman d’un tricheur"), the poetic realism (Jean Renoir’s "La Bête humaine", Marcel Carne "Le Jour se lève"), the cinema under the Occupation (Henri-Georges Clouzot’s "Le Corbeau"), the evocation of the Belle Epoque (Max Ophuls’ "Le Plaisir"), the revival of the literary adaptation (Robert Bresson’s "Journal d’un cure de campagne").

African-American Migration Narratives

33900
ENGL 454
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
J. Stewart

During the first half of the 20th century, millions of African Americans moved from the South to Northern cities in search of increased social, political and economic opportunities. This "Great Migration" dramatically shifted America’s racial demographics, and raised difficult questions about the role of African Americans in urban industrial modernity. This course considers the emergence and development of the African American migration narrative, a form which, as Farah Jasmine Griffin has argued, occupies a major place in 20th century African American cultural production. We will discuss how African American artists and intellectuals have documented and refigured the migration in a variety of media (literature, film, visual art, music) to serve their particular historical, aesthetic and political projects. We will pay particular attention to how intra-racial questions of class, color and gender inflect African American migration narratives produced at different historical moments. Texts include novels by Ralph Ellison (Invisible Man) and Toni Morrison (Jazz); essays by LeRoi Jones (Blues People) and Richard Wright (12 Million Black Voices); selections of jazz, blues and R & B music; paintings by Jacob Lawrence ("The Migration of the Negro" series); letters written by migrants; and films by Oscar Micheaux (Within Our Gates) and Julie Dash (Daughters of the Dust).

Film in India

34100
CMST 24100, Anth 20600/31100, Hist 26700/36700, SALC 20500/30500
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
R. Inden

Considers the film world from just before Independence (1947) down to the present. Most attention will be paid to the Hindi film, especially to its "peculiar" features, for example, the song and dance. Emphasis is placed on reconstruction of film-related activities that can be taken as life practices from the standpoint of "elites" and "masses," "middle classes," men and women, people in cities and villages, governmental institutions, businesses, and the "nation." The course will rely on people’s notions of the everyday, festive days, paradise, arcadia and utopia to pose questions about how people try to realize their wishes and themselves through film. How film practices articulated with colonialism, nationalism, "socialist development," and, now, "free markets" will be a major concern. Students will be asked to familiarize themselves with existing approaches to Indian film against the background of more general approaches to film and the media. Some knowledge of Hindi desirable but not required (most films will be subtitled in English and have English synopses).

Eisenstein and Soviet Aesthetic Theory

35000
CMST 250, ArtH 375, ComLit 223/323, COVA 248, Russ 228/328
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
Y. Tsivian

Eisenstein’s career as a director covers twenty years of rapidly changing styles and techniques of film making; as a theorist, he responded to every topic posed by film history, and his cultural influence does not seem to weaken with years. Despite his fame, however, Eisenstein largely remains an unknown figure. Only part of his writings have been published and his debt, as well as his contribution, to major trends in 20th century thought remain largely unexplored. Approaching this versatile figure from the perspectives of film, theater, art history, comparative literature, Slavic studies, and art history, we will place Eisenstein’s work in the context of contemporary Soviet aesthetics--and Soviet aesthetics in the context of Eisenstein. Reading knowledge of Russian useful but not required.

Classical Film Theory

37000
CMST 270, ENGL 283/483, GS Hum 206
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2000-2001
J. Naremore

This course examines basic questions associated with the film medium through the writings of some of its earliest and most influential theorists. Beginning with the question of what constitutes a "theoretical" or "philosophical" approach to film, we pursue a series of persistent issues. What is the nature of filmÕs relationship to reality? Are there "essential" features of the medium that determine its form? How do images and editing make meaning? We place writers (such as Vachel Lindsay, Hugo MŸnsterberg, Sergei Eisenstein, Siegfried Kracauer, Walter Benjamin, André Bazin) in historical and cultural terms, and use their work to frame our own theoretical questions.

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