Introduction to Film

10100
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
R. Bird

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Introduction to Film

10100
ARTH 20000,ENGL 10800,ARTV 25300
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
S. Skvirsky

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Film and the Moving Image

14400
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
S. Skvirsky

This course seeks to develop skills in perception, comprehension, and interpretation when dealing with film and other moving image media. It encourages the close analysis of audiovisual forms, their materials and formal attributes, and explores the range of questions and methods appropriate to the explication of a given film or moving image text. It also examines the intellectual structures basic to the systematic study and understanding of moving images. Most importantly, the course aims to foster in students the ability to translate this understanding into verbal expression, both oral and written. Texts and films are drawn from the history of narrative, experimental, animated, and documentary or non-fiction cinema. Screenings are a mandatory course component.

Open only to non-CMS majors. May not count toward a CMS major. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

 

Film and the Moving Image

14400
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
A. Field

This course seeks to develop skills in perception, comprehension, and interpretation when dealing with film and other moving image media. It encourages the close analysis of audiovisual forms, their materials and formal attributes, and explores the range of questions and methods appropriate to the explication of a given film or moving image text. It also examines the intellectual structures basic to the systematic study and understanding of moving images. Most importantly, the course aims to foster in students the ability to translate this understanding into verbal expression, both oral and written. Texts and films are drawn from the history of narrative, experimental, animated, and documentary or non-fiction cinema. Screenings are a mandatory course component.

Open only to non-CMS majors. May not count toward a CMS major. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

 

Cinema in Theory and Practice

14503
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
D. Bluher

The course proposes an introduction to audio-visual literacy through the analysis of films, selective readings, and short film exercises focusing on fundamental cinematic elements such as shot, framing, point of view, camera movement, editing, and relations of image and sound. Assignments will consist in in writing review sheets and a formal film analysis, and in creating 1-3 minute single-shot movies based on the works seen and discussed in class. This course is open only to non-Cinema and Media Studies majors and cannot be counted toward the major. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

Three Film Masters of South Korea

24621
EALC 24510
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
H. Park

This course examines selected film texts of three representative film masters in South Korea: Shin Sang-ok, Kim Ki-young, and Im Kwon-taek, who began their careers as popular film directors, and now are considered ‘auteurs’ of Korean cinema by their unique visual styles and narratives that reflect main concerns and issues of post-war Korean society. The leading figure of the Golden Age, Shin Sang-ok (1926-2006) demonstrates virtuosity in mainstream drama film productions as he explores topical issues such as the impact of modernity on women and Korean society during accelerated national development. In contrast to Shin’s mild style, the grotesque cinema of Kim Ki-young (1919-1998) showcases eroticism, horror, and thrillers that inscribe the fear of modernization onto the world of desire and fantasy. Im Kwon-taek (1936-present) articulates the scars of modern Korean history and its vanishing culture at the expense of industrialization through the spheres of traditional art, religion, and the sacrificed female body. Taken together, the chosen films of these three directors provide us with instances which enable us to grasp the core of their cinematic explorations, as well as diverse aspects of aesthetics, politics, and themes in South Korean cinema, from its Golden Age of the 1960s to the present.

Claire Denis

26803
FNDL 26803. FREN 26803
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
D. Bluher

Claire Denis is one of the major artistic voices in contemporary French cinema, and one of the most challenging filmmakers working today. In over 25 years, she has created an impressive body of work from across a wide variety of genres ranging from semi-autobiographical films informed by her own experiences during her childhood in Africa (Chocolat, White Material) to allegorical horror films (Trouble Every Day). Currently she is working on her first English language science-fiction film High-Life.  I Can’t Sleep is based on the true story of Thierry Paulin, a gay, black, HIV-positive, transvestite and serial killer. Her best-known film to date Beau Travail is loosely inspired by Herman Melville’s Billy Budd, and The Intruder by the homonymous autobiographical essay by French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy. We will also have a look at her lesser known films for television, her documentaries about dance and music, and her short films. Her films reflect a deep awareness of the complexities of French post-colonialism, as well as mesmerizing and sensual mise-en-scène of desire. 

Students taking the class for French credit are expected to complete written assignments (and readings as applicable) in French.

Senior Colloquium

29800
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
J. Stewart

This seminar is designed to provide fourth-year students with a sense of the variety of methods and approaches in the field (e.g., formal analysis, cultural history, industrial history, reception studies, psychoanalysis). Students present material related to their BA project, which is discussed in relation to the issues of the course.

African American Cinema 1900 to 1950

21019
31019
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
A. Field

Description to come.

Chicago Film Cultures

21805
31805
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
J. Stewart

Chicago not only boasts a rich history of film production (from silent comedies to industrial, educational, student, documentary, and contemporary Hollywood filmmaking) but also has a long, significant history of film presentation.  Chicago features iconic movie palaces built downtown and in neighborhoods across the city in the 1920s.  And it is has been the site of a wide variety of film exhibition venues and film-related events that are currently thriving: festivals, conferences, workshops, lectures.  Films are screened in every type of museum (history, art, science), in large mainstream venues and in smaller, community-based and artist-run spaces.  Our own campus boasts Doc Films, the longest-running film society in the country. This course examines the conceptual and historical frameworks that have been used for presenting cinema – historical and contemporary – in the city's varied institutional and cultural contexts.  Students will study past film and current cultures in Chicago by researching particular events, venues, critics and curators, and by employing a variety of methods, including archival research, participant observation and interviews. Topics covered will include include exhibition, funding and marketing, debates on curating and film in museums, audience and fan culture studies (with attention to Chicago's particular demographic contours), national cinemas, genre, authorship and multi-media presentational modes.

Documentary Production 1

23930
33930
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
J. Hoffman

This class is intended to develop skills in documentary production so that students may apply for Documentary Production II. Documentary Production I focuses on the making of independent documentary video. Examples of various styles of documentary will be screened and discussed. Issues embedded in the documentary genre, such as the ethics and politics of representation and the shifting lines between fact and fiction will be explored. Pre-production methodologies, production, and post-production techniques will be taught. Students will be expected to develop an idea for a documentary video, crews will be formed, and each crew will produce a five-minute documentary. Students will also be expected to purchase an external hard drive.

American Horror Film

25503
35503
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
J. Lastra

Description to come.

Alternate Reality Games: Theory and Production

25954
35954
BPRO 28700
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
P. Jagoda and H. Coleman

This experimental course explores the emerging genre of “alternate reality” or “transmedia” gaming.  Throughout the quarter, we will approach new media theory through the history, aesthetics, and design of transmedia games. For all of their novelty, these games build on the narrative strategies of novels, the performative role-playing of theater, the branching techniques of electronic literature, the procedural qualities of videogames, and the team dynamics of sports. Beyond the subject matter, this course is a springboard for transforming the 2017 orientation for the incoming class of approximately 1,500 first-year students into an Alternate Reality Game. Students in this course, thus, will not only be learning how to design a game but also contributing directly to the research and construction of this large-scale project. Building on this interdisciplinary research, we intend to design the University of Chicago orientation as a game that might help undergraduate students acclimate to the university setting and develop capacities linked to collaboration, leadership, and twenty-first century literacies. In particular, we are interested in discovering how interactive and participatory learning methods, which are central to the form of games, might help university students discuss and better understand complicated issues of inclusivity, diversity, and safety.

Fluxus and the Question of Media

27804
37804
ARTH 21314, ARTH 31314
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
I. Blom

The course investigates the international Fluxus network of the 1960’s and 70’s from a media perspective. Often identified with the concept of “intermedia” launched in a 1966 text by artist, writer and publisher Dick Higgins, Fluxus artists seemed at pain to distinguish their work from the multimedia or gesamtkunstwerk approaches of the Happening artists, seeking instead to formulate a mode of working between or even beyond media. Underpinned by a desire to pass beyond the work of art itself, this was a complex position that had profound implications for their approaches to technologies and practices such as film, video, computing, sound/music, theatre, poetry and image-making. We will try to map the various facets of this position, with particular emphasis on its relation to another key Fluxus concept: the work as event.

Framing, Re-framing, and Un-framing Cinema

27805
37805
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
T. Gunning, M. Downie, P. Kaiser

By cinema, we mean the art of the moving image, which is not limited to the material support of a flexible band called film.  This art reaches back to early devices  to trick the eye into seeing motion and looks forward to new media and new modes of presentation. With the technological possibility of breaking images into tiny pixels and reassembling them and of viewing them in new way that this computerized image allows, we now face the most radical transformation of the moving image since the very beginnings of cinema.

A collaboration between the OpenEndedGroup (Marc Downie and Paul Kaiser) artists who have created new modes of the moving image for more than decade and film scholar Tom Gunning, this class will use this moment of new technologies to explore and expand the moving image before it becomes too rigidly determined by the powerful industrial forces now propelling it forward. This course will be intensely experimental as we see how we might use new computer algorithms to take apart and re-experience classic films of the past. By using new tools, developed for and during this class, students will make new experiences inside virtual reality environments for watching, analyzing and recombining films and that are unlike any other. These tools will enable students, regardless of previous programming experience, to participate in this crucial technological and cultural juncture.

Methods and Issues

40000
ARTH 39900, ENGL 48000, MAPH 33000
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
J. Wild

This course offers an introduction to ways of reading, writing on, and teaching film. The focus of discussion will range from methods of close analysis and basic concepts of film form, technique and style; through industrial/critical categories of genre and authorship (studios, stars, directors); through aspects of the cinema as a social institution, psycho-sexual apparatus and cultural practice; to the relationship between filmic texts and the historical horizon of production and reception. Films discussed will include works by Griffith, Lang, Hitchcock, Deren, Godard.

History of International Cinema, Part I: Silent Era

28500
48500
ARTH 28500,ARTH 38500,CMLT 22400,CMLT 32400,CMST 48500,ENGL 29300,ENGL 48700,MAPH 33600,ARTV 26500,ARTV 36500
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
T. Gunning

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Philosophy and Film: Stanley Cavell

67206
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
D. Rodowick

This seminar is devoted to Stanley Cavell’s writings on film as read in the context of his larger philosophical project. Keeping in mind Cavell’s emphasis that film that film is not separate from philosophy, but is, rather, a philosophical accompaniment to our everyday lives, we will discuss all of his major works on cinema and many of the occasional essays while examining his major conceptual contributions to the study of photography and moving images. Cavell’s original contributions to the critical study of Hollywood and European cinema, the phenomenology of film and photography, the concept of genres, the study of gender, acting, and film stardom, and to relation between psychoanalysis and film will also be discussed.

Media Atmospheres: Art & Biopolitics at the End of the 20th Century

67808
ARTH 41314
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
I. Blom

In the late 1990’s and early 00’s contemporary art seemed to turn towards design, architecture and fashion, leading many critics to claim that the boundaries between the practices of art and design were eroding. This course proposes a different line of inquiry, based on the fact that so many of the artworks in question were in fact hidden media machines, improvisations on a life environment increasingly suffused in the dynamics of networked media technologies and their various modes of time production and -control. Elements of design and architecture were in other words enlisted in the construction of what we may call media atmospheres, everyday sensorial surrounds that addressed the intimate integration of bodies and real-time technologies in the information economy, a new modality of the capture of life forces that Michel Foucault called biopolitics. In the late 1990’s and early 00’s contemporary art seemed to turn towards design, architecture and fashion, leading many critics to claim that the boundaries between the practices of art and design were eroding. This course proposes a different line of inquiry, based on the fact that so many of the artworks in question were in fact hidden media machines, improvisations on a life environment increasingly suffused in the dynamics of networked media technologies and their various modes of time production and -control. Elements of design and architecture were in other words enlisted in the construction of what we may call media atmospheres, everyday sensorial surrounds that addressed the intimate integration of bodies and real-time technologies in the information economy, a new modality of the capture of life forces that Michel Foucault called biopolitics.

The course will be oriented around a close study of a select number of artistic positions, in addition to reading theoretical and critical texts that were important to the artists in question as well as to the larger field of discussion. Ultimately, the course is about a form of new media art less invested in technical invention than in new aesthetic techniques of social production.

Sound Studies

68004
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2016-2017
J. Lastra

Description coming soon.

Introduction to Film

10100
ARTH 20000,ENGL 10800,ARTV 25300
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
Staff

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Film and the Moving Image

14400
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
R. Majumdar

This course seeks to develop skills in perception, comprehension, and interpretation when dealing with film and other moving image media. It encourages the close analysis of audiovisual forms, their materials and formal attributes, and explores the range of questions and methods appropriate to the explication of a given film or moving image text. It also examines the intellectual structures basic to the systematic study and understanding of moving images. Most importantly, the course aims to foster in students the ability to translate this understanding into verbal expression, both oral and written. Texts and films are drawn from the history of narrative, experimental, animated, and documentary or non-fiction cinema. Screenings are a mandatory course component.

Open only to non-CMS majors. May not count toward a CMS major. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

Film and the Moving Image

14400
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
Staff

This course seeks to develop skills in perception, comprehension, and interpretation when dealing with film and other moving image media. It encourages the close analysis of audiovisual forms, their materials and formal attributes, and explores the range of questions and methods appropriate to the explication of a given film or moving image text. It also examines the intellectual structures basic to the systematic study and understanding of moving images. Most importantly, the course aims to foster in students the ability to translate this understanding into verbal expression, both oral and written. Texts and films are drawn from the history of narrative, experimental, animated, and documentary or non-fiction cinema. Screenings are a mandatory course component.

Open only to non-CMS majors. Cannot be coutned toward CMS major. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

Authorship in Cinema and Media

14508
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
J. Stewart

Description coming soon.

This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

Film Noir

15103
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
D. Morgan

Description coming soon.

American Television: From Broadcast Networks to the Internet

25951
ENGL 25951
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
P. Jagoda

The idea of electromechanically transmitted moving images dates back to the nineteenth century and the first technological demonstration of televised moving images took place in the 1920s. While this course touches upon the early history of television, we will focus our attention on the era between the commercialization of broadcast television in the United States (in the early 1950s) and the rise of internet-based television streaming services such as Netflix (in the 2000s). As we will see, the history of television in these years, intersects with numerous other media, such as radio, film, video, digital games, and the novel. Alongside a study of the medium of television and its role in American culture, we will attend carefully to the form of TV narrative as it changes from an early episodic format to the complex long-form serial narratives that attained maturity in the 1990s. Through historical, formal, and cultural analyses, we will attempt to make sense of the renaissance of television narrative characterized by such serial programs as The Sopranos, The Wire, and Breaking Bad, as well as more recent works such as Mr. Robot. The course combines theoretical texts with close readings of particular television shows. Requirements include engaged participation in class discussion, weekly blog entries, a mid-term paper, and a substantive final research paper. There will be no exams.

Popular Science and New Media: Methods, Theory, and Practice

27811
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
M. Kressbach

This course explores affinities between new media forms and technologies (e.g., digital cinema, video games, streamable television, fitness trackers, smartphone apps) and contemporary science and medicine (e.g., infectious disease, noninvasive surgical procedures, drug addiction treatment). How do new media represent scientific processes and expertise? What are the particular habits and patterns produces by new media technologies? And how do they affect medical research methods and practice? Readings and screenings draw from across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities, and range from scholarly works to news articles, blog posts, videos, and mobile apps. Students will be asked to analyze, operate, and play with scientific new media. Central texts include recent science-driven films, like Contagion and The Martian, virtual dissection and surgical training smartphone apps, and pandemic games Infection and Bio Inc. The variety of activities will ask students to question the many ways in which new media respond to and shape scientific and medical research—and vice-versa.

Creative Thesis Workshop

23905
33905
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
J. Hoffman

This seminar will focus on how to craft a creative thesis in film or video. Works-in-progress will be screened each week, and technical and structural issues relating to the work will be explored. The workshop will also develop the written portion of the creative thesis. The class is limited to seniors from CMS and DOVA, and MAPH students working on a creative thesis.

Documentary Production 2

23931
33931
ARTV 23931, ARTV 33931, HMRT 25107, HMRT 35107
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017

This course focuses on the shaping and crafting of a nonfiction video. Students are expected to write a treatment detailing their project. Production techniques focus on the handheld camera versus tripod, interviewing and microphone placement, and lighting for the interview. Postproduction covers editing techniques and distribution strategies. Students then screen final projects in a public space.

Spike Lee

26100
36100
FNDL 26110
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
J. Stewart

Description coming soon.

Classical Film Theory

27220
37220
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
D. Rodowick

This seminar will present a critical survey of the principal authors, concepts, and films in the classical period of film theory.  The main though not exclusive emphasis will be the period of silent film and theorists writing in the context of French and German cinema.  We will study the aesthetic debates of the period in their historical context, whose central questions include:  Is film an art?  If so, what specific and autonomous means of expression define it as an aesthetic medium?  What defines the social force and function of cinema as a mass art? Weekly readings and discussion will examine major film movements of the classical period—for example, French impressionism and Surrealism—as well as the work of major figures such as Hugo Münsterberg, Rudolf Arnheim, Jean Epstein, Germaine Dulac, Béla Balázs, Erwin Panofsky, Hans Richter, Siegfried Kracauer, Walter Benjamin, and André Bazin.Walter Benjamin, and André Bazin.

Contemporary Documentary

28202
38202
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
D. Bluher

Description coming soon.

The Films of Josef von Sternberg

26000
46000
FNDL 26001
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
T. Gunning

Description coming soon.

History of International Cinema 2

28600
48600
ARTH 28600,ARTH 38600,CMLT 22500,CMLT 32500, ENGL 29600,ENGL 48900,MAPH 33700,ARTV 26600
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
D. Morgan

The center of this course is film style, from the classical scene breakdown to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation, and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting). The development of a film culture is also discussed. Texts include Thompson and Bordwell's Film History: An Introduction; and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, and Godard. Screenings include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

Performance Theory: Action, Affect, Archive

62201
ENGL 59306
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
L. Kruger

This PhD seminar offers a critical introduction to performance theory and its applications not only to theatre but also to performance on film and, more controversially, to ‘performativity’ to fictional and other texts that have nothing directly to do with performance. The seminar will be organized around three key conceptual clusters: a) action, acting, and other forms of production or play, in theories from the classical (Aristotle) through the modern (Hegel, Brecht, Artaud), to the contemporary (Richard Schechner, Philip Zarilli, and others) b) affect, and its intersections with emotion and feeling: in addition to the impact of contemporary theories of affect and emotion (Massumi, Sedgwick) on performance theory (Erin Hurley), we will read earlier modern texts that anticipate recent debates (Diderot, Freud) and their current interpreters (Joseph Roach, Tim Murray and others), as well as those writing about the absence of affect and the performance of failure (Sara Bailes and others) c) archives and related institutions, practices and theories of recording performance, including the formation of audiences (Susan Bennett and with evaluating print and other media yielding evidence of ephemeral acts, including the work of theorists of memory (Pierre Nora) and remains (Rebecca Schneider), theatre historians (Rose Bank, Jody Enders, Tracy Davis and others) as well as current theorists on the tensions between the archive and the repertoire (Diana Taylor) or between excavation and performance (Michael Shanks/ Mike Pearson) Requirements: one or two oral presentations of assigned texts and final paper. To prepare PhDs for professional writing, final paper will take the form of a review article (ca 5000 words) examining key concepts in the field and the controversies they may engender, by way of two recent books that tackle these concepts.

Film Comedy

65500
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
X. Dong

What can film tell us about comedy, and vice versa? This course investigates the comic procedures in various film forms - from silent slapstick and sophisticated comedy to screwball comedy and musical all the way to postmodern pastiche and mockumentary. Instead of treating film comedy as a self-contained genre, we will study how questions of comedy are central to the history of cinema. Readings include critical discourses about comedy, film history and film theory, e.g. Bergson, Freud, Benjamin, Miriam Hansen, Tom Gunning and Noel Carroll. It is often said that a joke dies when we analyze it. We will see that it in fact reincarnates, if we analyze it the right way.

Melodrama North and South

65511
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2016-2017
S. Skvirsky

This course is a comparative examination of film melodrama in Latin America and in the United States-two regions where the melodrama represents a dominant mode of filmmaking. Topics will include debates about melodrama as mode versus genre; the racial melodrama; melodrama and documentary form; melodrama and historical narrative; melodrama and utopian politics.

Introduction to Film

10100
ARTH 20000,ENGL 10800,ARTV 25300
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2016-2017
Staff

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Film and the Moving Image

14400
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2016-2017
Staff

This course seeks to develop skills in perception, comprehension, and interpretation when dealing with film and other moving image media. It encourages the close analysis of audiovisual forms, their materials and formal attributes, and explores the range of questions and methods appropriate to the explication of a given film or moving image text. It also examines the intellectual structures basic to the systematic study and understanding of moving images. Most importantly, the course aims to foster in students the ability to translate this understanding into verbal expression, both oral and written. Texts and films are drawn from the history of narrative, experimental, animated, and documentary or non-fiction cinema. Screenings are a mandatory course component.

Open only to non-CMS majors. May not count toward a CMS major. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

 

Film and the Moving Image

14400
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2016-2017
D. Morgan

This course seeks to develop skills in perception, comprehension, and interpretation when dealing with film and other moving image media. It encourages the close analysis of audiovisual forms, their materials and formal attributes, and explores the range of questions and methods appropriate to the explication of a given film or moving image text. It also examines the intellectual structures basic to the systematic study and understanding of moving images. Most importantly, the course aims to foster in students the ability to translate this understanding into verbal expression, both oral and written. Texts and films are drawn from the history of narrative, experimental, animated, and documentary or non-fiction cinema. Screenings are a mandatory course component.

Open only to non-CMS majors. May not count toward a CMS major. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

 

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