Courses

From Page to Screen: Literary Adaptation in the Italian Cinema

23201
33201
ITAL
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
R. West

Italian cinema has a long history of adapting literary texts to the screen. From silent versions of Dante's Divine Comedy, to Pasolini's iconoclastic film version of Boccaccio's Decameron; from neorealist cinema's often disavowed connection to literary sources, to very recent film adaptations both of classic texts such as Pinocchio and contemporary novels by authors such as Cavazzoni and Ammaniti, Italian cinema has fostered a strong tie with literature that is at once enriching to the two artistic modes in question, and theoretically complex. In this course we shall study selected theories of film adaptation, the history of Italian cinema's use of literature, and we shall analyze specific cases of book to screen adaptations. The wide influence of Pirandello on not only Italian but other national cinemas will be considered as well. Films studied will include Pasolini's Decameron, Visconti's Ossessione and Death in Venice, Benigni's Pinocchio, Fellini's La voce della luna, Rossellini's Ladri di biciclette (Bicycle Thief), Salvatores' Io non ho paura (I Am Not Afraid), and we shall read the texts upon which these films draw. Anthony Minghella's The Talented Mr. Ripley, set in Italy and based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith, will also be studied, as will one or two films that show the strong influence of Pirandellian concepts of the interplay of reality and illusion. Students concentrating in Italian studies will be expected to read materials in Italian; non-concentrators will do their work using English-language materials.

Cinema in Africa

24201
34201
ENGL 27600/48601
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
L. Kruger

This course examines cinema in Africa as well as films produced in Africa. It places cinema in Sub-Saharan Africa in its social, cultural, and aesthetic contexts ranging from neocolonial to postcolonial, Western to Southern Africa, documentary to fiction, art cinema to TV. We will begin with La Noire de... (1966), ground-breaking film by the "father" of African cinema, Ousmane Sembene, contrasted with a South African film, The Magic Garden (1960) that more closely resembles African American musical film, and anti-colonial and anti-apartheid films from Lionel Rogosin's Come Back Africa (1959) to Sarah Maldoror's Sambizanga, Ousmane Sembene's Camp de Thiaroye (1984), and Jean Marie Teno's Afrique, Je te Plumerai (1995). The rest of the course will examine cinematic representations of tensions between urban and rural, traditional and modern life, and the different implications of these tensions for men and women, Western and Southern Africa, in fiction, documentary and ethnographic film.

Poetic Cinema

25501
35501
SLAV 29001/39001
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
R. Bird

Films are frequently denoted as "poetic" or "lyrical" in a vague sort of way. It has been applied equally to religious cinema and to the experimental avant-garde. Our task will be to interrogate this concept and to try to define what it actually is denoting. Films and critical texts will mainly be drawn from Soviet and French cinema of the 1920s-1930s and 1960s-1990s. Directors include Dovzhenko, Renoir, Cocteau, Resnais, Maya Deren, Tarkovsky, Pasolini, Jarman, and Sokurov. In addition to sampling these directors' own writings, we shall examine theories of poetic cinema by major critics from the Russian formalists to Andre Bazin beyond.

Antonioni's Films: Reality and Ambiguity

26801
36801
ARTH 28904, BPRO 26600, HUMA 26600
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
Y. Tsivian, B. Winstein

Third- or fourth-year standing. In this in-depth study of about six of Antonioni's films, our eye will be on understanding his vision about "reality" and the element of ambiguity that pervades nearly all of his films. In some of his films, and in his published writings, Antonioni shows a strong interest in science and in the physical world. Together, as a film scholar and a physicist, we can bring out these aspects of his work together with his unique cinematic contributions. We believe that Antonioni is an artist of Joycean stature (and there are interesting parallels between the two) whose work often gets lumped into categories such as "new wave European cinema" and the like. The goal of the course is to introduce students to this poet of the cinema and to see the relevance of Antonioni's themes in their own studies and their own lives. As a course project, students might very well be asked to develop an idea based upon the unfilmed sketches, consistent with Antonioni's vision.

Beginning Photography

27600
37600
ARTV 24000
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
Staff

Camera and light meter required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Field trips required.

Photography Workshop I

27602
37602
ARTV 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. Camera and light meter required.
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
L. Letinsky

ARTV 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. Camera and light meter required. Using photographic materials, black & white or color, students focus on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed toward the production of a cohesive body of photographic work. An investigation of contemporary and historic art issues informs the students' exploration as does extensive darkroom work, gallery visits, critical readings, group and individual critiques, and presentations. Course can be taken several times as color and/or black and white, with series of projects developing and changing. Taught concurrently with Photography Workshop II. Lab fee $60.

Photography Workshop II

27702
37702
ARTV 24402/34402
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
L. Letinsky

ARTV 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. Camera and light meter required. Using photographic materials, black & white or color, students focus on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed toward the production of a cohesive body of photographic work. An investigation of contemporary and historic art issues informs the students' exploration as does extensive darkroom work, gallery visits, critical readings, group and individual critiques, and presentations. Course can be taken several times as color and/or black and white, with series of projects developing and changing. Taught concurrently with Photography Workshop I.Lab fee $60.

Theories of Media

27800
37800
ARTH 25900/35900, ARTV 25400, ENGL 12800/32800, ISHU 21800, MAPH 32800
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
W.J.T. Mitchell

Any 10000-level ARTH or ARTV course, or consent of instructor. This course explores the concept of media and mediation in very broad terms, looking not only at modern technical media and mass media but also at the very idea of a medium as a means of communication, a set of institutional practices and a habitat in which images proliferate and take on a life of their own. Readings include classic texts (e.g., Plato s Allegory of the Cave and Cratylus, Aristotle s Poetics); and modern texts (e.g., Marshall McLuhan s Understanding Media, Regis Debray s Mediology, Friedrich Kittler s Gramaphone, Film, Typewriter).

Documentary Video

28000
38000
ARTV 23901/33901
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
J. Hoffman

This course focuses on the making of independent documentary video. Examples of direct cinema, cinéma vérité, the essay, ethnographic film, the diary and self-reflexive cinema, historical and biographical film, agitprop/activist forms, and guerilla television are screened and discussed. Topics include the ethics and politics of representation and the shifting lines between fact and fiction. Labs explore pre-production, camera, sound, and editing. Students develop an idea for a documentary video; form crews; and produce, edit, and screen a five-minute documentary. A two-hour lab is required in addition to class time. Lab fee $50.

Adaptation: Literature, Drama, Opera, Film

28302
38302
GRMN 27600/376000, MUSI 30706
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
D. Levin

An intensive, comparative examination of theories & practices of adaptation. We consider a disparate set of case studies spanning a host of epochs and genres (e.g., Schiller/Brecht/Dreyer's St. Joan; Heine/Wagner's Flying Dutchman; Fontane/Fassbinder's Effi Briest; Buechner/Berg/Herzog's Woyzeck). Beyond exploring the stakes and traces of adaptation in each work, we will be occupied by interstices--the generic, programmatic, historical, institutional and expressive spaces that open between a work and its precursors. I'm guessing that all materials are available in English, but a reading knowledge of German would be exceedingly helpful. Open to advanced undergraduates and beginning graduates.

Early Video Art

28700
38700
ARTV 26700/30100
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
Staff

A survey of the first wave of video art in the U.S. We will be screening and discussing the first ten years of video produced by artists and activists, primarily on the east coast and in California, including Bruce Nauman, John Baldessari, Martha Rosler, Eleanor Antin and Top Value Television. Because of relatively inexpensive equipment and inherently synced sound, video democratized the production of moving images, allowing artists to challenge imagined limits of broadcast television and encultured gender representations. Much of the work we will be looking at in this new medium was made as an auxillary activity by artists already working in sculpture, conceptual art, and performance. We will analyze the work as it relates both to this art context and to the socio-political climate of the seventies.

Video Workshop

28903
38903
ARTV 23801
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
Staff

ARTV 23800 or consent of instructor. This is a production course geared towards short experimental works and video within a studio art context. Screenings include recent works by Harrison and Wood, Fischli and Weiss, Martin Kersels, Jane and Louise Wilson, Halflifers, and Douglas Gordon. Discussions and readings address non-narrative strategies, rapidly changing technology, and viable approaches to producing video art in a world full of video images. Lab fee $60.

History of International Cinema, Part I, Silent Era

28500
48500
ARTH 28600/38600, ARTV 26600, CMLT 22500/32500, ENGL 29600/48900, MAPH 33700
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
Y. Tsivian

CMST 10100 must be take before or concurrently with this course. This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
Staff

Consent of instructor. Please register by faculty section.

Seminar: South Africa in the Global Imaginary

64201
ENGL 66700
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2006-2007
L. Kruger

This seminar will begin with the persistent fascination in the global North, especially in the US, with the pathos of anti apartheid suffering. In the global and especially US imaginary, South Africa figures as stories of pathos and heroism from Cry the Beloved Country (1948; filmed in 1951 and 1993 recently assigned by Ophrah's book club) to the American made and targeted film Amandla: a revolution in four part harmony (2004). It will deconstruct that fascination through the critical examination of 20th and 21st C South African English literature and culture whose authors choose sometimes to address overseas audiences and sometimes pointedly to ignore them. Literary texts may include those by authors in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century colonial period (Schreiner, Haggard, ..), the neocolonial Union, 1910-1948 (Dhlomo, Dikobe...), as well as the response to apartheid (1950-1994), from the Sophiatown generation (Nkosi, Mphahlele, Modisane, Gordimer, Fugard...) and beyond (Ndebele, Coetzee, Bessie Head), and the writers of plays and stories of the so-called Soweto generation, and the present post-anti-apartheid (if not postapartheid period), especially the work of minority ("Indian," "colored") South Africans, such as Achmat Visual texts include feature films, including adaptations of fiction since 1930s, documentary since the 1970s, and recent TV. We will also examine criticism and theory, both local (Dhlomo, Nkosi, Ndebele, Coetzee...) and abroad (Bhabha, Fanon, Chakrabarty, Gramsci,..), viz the applicability or not of post/colonial terminology to South Africa.

Introduction to Film I

10100
ARTV 25300, ENGL 10800, ISHU 20000
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
J. Stewart

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

The Film Musical

15401
MUSI 23906
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
S. Keller

This course will primarily consider the historical and theoretical questions that the Hollywood film musical invites, although it will also make room to explore some related issues by looking at versions of musicals/dance films outside of Hollywood and beyond the studio era. Some of the questions the course will consider center on the following issues: the particular nature of the diegesis in Hollywood musicals (how the "numbers" relate to the narrative); the apparent boundaries of the genre; the generation of excess and affect; and ideological and feminist interpretations. Films will include The Smiling Lieutenant (Ernst Lubitsch, 1931), Le Million (Rene Clair, 1931), Jolly Fellows (Grigori Alexandrov, 1934), Top Hat (Mark Sandrich, 1935), The Gang's All Here (Busby Berkeley, 1943), Meet Me in St. Louis (Minnelli, 1944), Singin' in the Rain (Gene Kelly/Stanley Donen, 1952), Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (Howard Hawks, 1953), and Les Demoiselles de Rochefort (Jacques Demy, 1967).

Time Images: Cinematic Mediations of History in Japan

24904
BPRO, EALC 24601
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
J. Ketelaar, M. Raine

This course deals with theories of time, history and representation while making those ideas and problems concrete through a study of the way in which history in Japan has been mediated by the cinema. It explores the "timefulness" of cinematic images without assuming their automatic relation to the world or dismissing films for their invention, compression, and elision of historical facts. A close reading of a wide range of films produced in and about Japan in tandem with primary and secondary materials on theories of time, images, and national history will highlight the historicity and history of both film and Japan. All readings are in English; no knowledge of Japanese is required. Co-taught by professors of film studies and Japanese history this course seeks to focus attention on the emerging nexus between audio-visual media and historical studies.

The Frankfurt School

27502
ENGL 28103
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
M. Hansen

This seminar is concerned with debates, within and on the margins of the Frankfurt School (Kracauer, Benjamin, Adorno, Lowenthal, Kluge, et al.), on the transformation of culture in capitalist modernity. We will focus on discussions concerning the technological media, in particular film (but also photography, radio, and television) and new forms of subjectivity, reception, and publicness catalyzed by these media. We will consider the issue of alternative cinema, for example through responses to Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin, as well as the question of a specific aesthetics of film and its relevance in the age of video and digital media. Not least, this course is about how to read, and work with, theoretical texts. MA students by permission of instructor only.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Chicago Film History

21801
31801
ARTV 26750/36750
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
J. Hoffman

This course will screen and discuss films to consider whether there is a Chicago style of filmmaking. We will trace how the city informs documentary, educational, industrial, narrative feature, and avant-garde films. If there is a Chicago style of filmmaking, one must look at the landscape of the city, the design, politics, cultures, and labor of its people, and how they live their lives. The protagonists and villains in these films are the politicians and community organizers, our locations are the neighborhoods, and the set designers are MIes van der Rohe and the Chicago Housing Authority.

Czech New Wave Cinema

24401
34401
SLAV 26700/3700
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
M. Sternstein

The insurgent film movement known as the Czech New Wave spawned such directors as as the internationally acclaimed Milos Forman (The Fireman's Ball, Loves of a Blonde), Jiri Menzel (Closely Watched Trains), Jan Kadar (The Shop on Main Street), and Vera Chytilova (Daisies), and the lesser known but nationally inspirational Evald Schorm, Jarmir Jires, Oldrich Lipsky and Jan Nemec. "Of course," Peter Cowie notes, "many of these directors had already slogged through various worthy feature-length assignments [before 1964]. But some magical alchemy worked upon them to respond to the spirit of their time in a way that remains unsurpassed." This indeterminate "magical alchemy of their time"--the serendipitous life of the Czech New Wave--is as much a subject of the course's inquiry as close technical and semantic research of the films themselves.

Propaganda and Agitation: Film Policy and Film Style in Wartime Japan

24905
34905
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
M. Raine

This class surveys the ways in which cinema was understood and deployed as both national art and "optical weapon" during a time of total war. We will study the attempts to control cinema, particularly the Film Law of 1939 and the debates over "national policy films" and "people's films." We will analyze the German connection (co-productions and culture films) that was part of an attempt to raise the aesthetic and technical level of cinema in Japan in order to compete with the memory of Hollywood films both at "home" and in the Asian countries occupied by Japan. We will also study more local sources of wartime Japanese cinema, in the prewar leftist film movement, the documentary film movement, the narrative avant-garde, and the broader image culture of wartime Japan. Filmmakers we will study include Arnold Fanck, Mizoguchi Kenji, Ozu Yasujiro, Tasaka Tomotaka, Imai Tadashi, Yamamoto Kajiro, and Kurosawa Akira. No knowledge of Japanese is required: a separate section will be held for those wishing to read and discuss Japanese sources. Research topics and credit will be assigned according to interest and capabilities.

Beginning Photography

27600
37600
ARTV 24000
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
Staff

Camera and light meter required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Field trips required.

Photography Workshop I

27602
37602
ARTV 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. Camera and light meter required.
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
L. Letinsky

ARTV 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. Camera and light meter required. Using photographic materials, black & white or color, students focus on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed toward the production of a cohesive body of photographic work. An investigation of contemporary and historic art issues informs the students' exploration as does extensive darkroom work, gallery visits, critical readings, group and individual critiques, and presentations. Course can be taken several times as color and/or black and white, with series of projects developing and changing. Taught concurrently with Photography Workshop II. Lab fee $60.

Photography Workshop II

27702
37702
ARTV 24402/34402
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
L. Letinsky

ARTV 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. Camera and light meter required. Using photographic materials, black & white or color, students focus on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed toward the production of a cohesive body of photographic work. An investigation of contemporary and historic art issues informs the students' exploration as does extensive darkroom work, gallery visits, critical readings, group and individual critiques, and presentations. Course can be taken several times as color and/or black and white, with series of projects developing and changing. Taught concurrently with Photography Workshop I.Lab fee $60.

Documentary Video: Production Techniques

28001
38001
ARTV 23902
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
J. Hoffman

ARTV 23901 or consent of instructor This course focuses on the shaping and crafting of a nonfiction video. Sutdents are expected to write a treatment detailing their project. Production techniques concentrate on the handheld camera versus tripod, interviewing and microphone placement, and lighting for the interview. Post-production covers editing techniques and distribution strategies. Students then screen final projects in a public space.

History of International Cinema, Part II, Sound Era

28600
48600
ARTH 28600/38600, ARTV 26600, CMLT 22500/32500, ENGL 29600/48900, MAPH 33700
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
Y. Tsivian

CMST 10100. This is the second part of the international survey history of film covering the sound era up to 1960. It is strongly recommended that students take the first section first. This course focuses on industrial practices and aesthetics during Hollywood s studio era (1927 to 1960) and alternatives to the Hollywood film, including French poetic realism, Italian neorealism, and Japanese cinema. We will also consider the important political, economic, social and cultural forces, which influenced Hollywood and other cinemas during this period, particularly the rise of fascism in the 1930s, WWII, Hollywood s postwar economic struggles, and various national new wave cinemas. Screenings will include films by Berkeley, Renoir, Huston, Welles, De Sica, Ozu, Hitchcock and Godard.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2006-2007
Staff

Consent of instructor. Please register by faculty section.

Introduction to Film I

10100
ARTH 20000, COVA 25300, ENGL 10800, ISHU 20000
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2005-2006
J. Yumibe

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Digital Imaging

28800
COVA 22500
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2005-2006
A. Ruttan

COVA 10100 or 10200, or consent of instructor. Using the Macintosh platform this course serves as an introduction to the use of digital technology as a means of making visual art. Instruction will cover Photo Shop's graphics program as well as digital imaging hardware (scanners, storage, and printing). In addition we will be addressing problems of color, design, collage, and drawing. Topics of discussion may include questions regarding the mediated image and its relationship to art as well as examining what constitutes the "real" in contemporary culture.

Video I: Short Experiments

28900
COVA 23800
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2005-2006
Staff

COVA 10100 or 10200, or CMST 10100. An introduction to video making, with digital cameras and non-linear (digital) editing. Students will produce a group of short works, which will be contextualized by viewing and discussion of historical and contemporary video works. Video versus film, editing strategies and appropriation are some of the subjects that will be part of an ongoing conversation. Lab fee $60.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2005-2006
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

Senior Colloquium

29800
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2005-2006
T. Gunning

CMST 10100. Required of all Cinema and Media Studies concentrators. This seminar is designed to provide senior concentrators with a sense of the variety of methods and approaches in the field (such as formal analysis, cultural history, industrial history, reception studies, psychoanalysis). Students will present material relating to their B.A. project, which will be discussed in relation to the issues of the course.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2005-2006
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Cult of Personality: Hitler, Stalin, Mao

27501
37501
EEUR 24500/34500
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2005-2006
M. Sternstein

While interested in the historical and political girders for the regimes of Hitler, Stalin, and Mao, the focus of this course is the psycho-erotic blueprint of their cults of personality. With the view of evaluating how visual discourse and the culture industry manufacture charisma and how violence might inhere in the production and maintenance of charisma, we read from a variety of genres on the topic (i.e., critical theory, fiction, memoir), including works by Georges Bataille, Milan Kundera, Norman Manea, Martin Amis, and Anchee Min

Beginning Photography

27600
37600
COVA 24401/34401
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2005-2006
Staff

COVA 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. A camera and a light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Field trips required.

Issues in Film Music

28100
38100
MUSI 22901/30901
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2005-2006
B. Hoeckner

This course explores the role of film music in the history of cinema. What role does music play as part of the narrative (source music) and as non-diegetic music (underscoring)? How does music of different styles and provenance contribute to the semiotic universe of film? And how did film music assume a central voice in twentieth-century culture? We study music composed for films (original scores) as well as pre-existent music (such as popular and classical music). The twenty films covered in the course may include classical Hollywood cinema, documentaries, foreign (including non-Western) films, experimental films, musicals, and cartoons.

Non-fiction Film: Representations and Performance

28200
38200
COVA 25100/35101, HRMT 25101
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2005-2006
J. Hoffman

We will attempt to define Non-Fiction cinema by looking at the history of its major modes. These include the Documentary, Essay, Ethnographic, and Agit-prop film, as well as Personal/autobiographical and Experimental works that are less easily classifiable. We will explore some of the theoretical discourses that surround this most philosophical of film genres, such as the ethics and politics of representation, and the shifting lines between fact and fiction, truth and reality. The relationship between the Documentary and the State will be examined in light of the genre s tendancy to inform and instruct. We will consider the tensions of filmmaking and the performative aspects in front of the lens, as well as the performance of the camera itself. Finally, we will look at the ways in which distribution and television effect the production and content of non-fiction film.

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