Courses

Video Workshop

28903
COVA 23801
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
Staff

COVA 23800 or instructor consent; lab fee $60 billed directly on tuition bill. A production course geared towards experimental works and video within a studio art context. Screenings will include recent works by Harrison & Wood, Fischli & Weiss, Martin Kersels, Jane & Louise Wilson, Halflifers, Douglas Gordon and others. Discussions and readings will address non-narrative strategies, rapidly changing technology and viable approaches to producing video art in a world full of video images. Lab fee $60.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Bollywood India: Film and History

24102
34102
HIST 26701/36701, SALC 20502
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
R. Majumdar

The first Indian talkie "Alam Ara" was made in 1931 in Bombay. By 1947 the Bombay film industry was among the largest industries of the country. It now produces twice as many films as Hollywood, approximately one thousand films per year. Hindi films are critical for understanding the new Indian city, Indian discourses about gender and sexuality, Indian politics and the diaspora. Through Bollywood, this course is a study of South Asian imaginations of modernity and globalization.

Post-Socialist Filmmaking in China Since 1990

24602
34602
EALC 24602/34602
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
Y. Zhang

This class deals with postsocialist filmmaking in China after 1990, a 15-year period marked by profound ideological, socioeconomic, and cultural changes. Different modes of filmmaking have competed with each other and have generated a wide spectrum of representations and practices, and a new generation has emerged to claim critical attention at home and abroad. After a brief survey of competing modes and agencies, we will move from the fifth generation to the sixth generation and beyond (e.g., the new urban generation ). Directors to be studied in depth include Chen Kaige, Zhang Yuan, Guan Hu, Jiang Wen, Feng Xiaogang, Lou Ye, Dai Sijie, Li Yang, Jia Zhangke, and Zhang Yimou. Students are required to view all primary films, complete all required readings, make presentations in class, write five short papers and one term paper, and take a midterm and a final exam. All films carry English subtitles; all readings are in English. No knowledge of Chinese is required.

Narratives of Suspense in European and Russian Literature and Cinema

25102
35102
CMLT 22100, HUMA 26901/36901, ISHU 26901/36901, SLAV 26900/36900
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
R. Bird

This course explores the source of suspense, its structural role in narratives, and its implications for narrative theory and philosophical aesthetics. Examples are taken from various genres by authors including Samuel Taylor Coleridge, E. A. Poe, Arthur Conan Doyle, Fedor Dostoevsky, J. M. Coetzee, and Samuel Beckett. Consideration is also given to suspense in cinematic narratives (from Hitchcock to Tarkovsky). Theoretical readings (from Coleridge to Losev, Genette, Ricoeur, and Derrida) link suspense to detachment, distance, distraction, suspension of belief, and engagement.

Beginning Photography

27600
37600
COVA 24401/34401
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
L. Letinsky

COVA 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. A camera and a light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Field trips required.

Photography Workshop

27602
37602
COVA 24401/34401
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
L. Letinsky

COVA 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. A camera and a light meter are required. Using photographic materials, black & white or color, students focus on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed toward the production of a cohesive body of photographic work. An investigation of contemporary and historic art issues informs the students' exploration as does extensive darkroom work, gallery visits,critical readings, group and individual critiques, and presentations. Course can be taken several times as color and/or black and white, with series of projects developing and changing. Lab fee $60.

Photography Workshop II

27702
37702
COVA 24402/34402
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
L. Letinsky

COVA 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. Camera and light meter required. Using photographic materials, black & white or color, students focus on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed toward the production of a cohesive body of photographic work. An investigation of contemporary and historic art issues informs the students' exploration as does extensive darkroom work, gallery visits,critical readings, group and individual critiques, and presentations. Course can be taken several times as color and/or black and white, with series of projects developing and changing. Lab fee $60.

Theories of Media

27800
37800
ARTH 25900/35900, COVA 25400, ENGL 12800/32800, ISHU 21800, MAPH 32800
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
W.J.T. Mitchell

Any 10000-level ARTH or COVA course, or consent of instructor. This course explores the concept of media and mediation in very broad terms, looking not only at modern technical media and mass media but also at the very idea of a medium as a means of communication, a set of institutional practices and a habitat in which images proliferate and take on a life of their own. Readings include classic texts (e.g., Plato s Allegory of the Cave and Cratylus, Aristotle s Poetics); and modern texts (e.g., Marshall McLuhan s Understanding Media, Regis Debray s Mediology, Friedrich Kittler s Gramaphone, Film, Typewriter).

Documentary Video

28000
38000
COVA 23901/33901
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
J. Hoffman

This course focuses on the making of independent documentary video. Examples of direct cinema, cinéma vérité, the essay, ethnographic film, the diary and self-reflexive cinema, historical and biographical film, agitprop/activist forms, and guerilla television are screened and discussed. Topics include the ethics and politics of representation and the shifting lines between fact and fiction. Labs explore pre-production, camera, sound, and editing. Students develop an idea for a documentary video; form crews; and produce, edit, and screen a five-minute documentary. A two-hour lab is required in addition to class time. Lab fee $50.

Cinema and the First Avant-garde, 1890-1933

25201
45201
ARTH 25205, COVA 25201
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
T. Gunning

CMST 10100 and CMST 28500, or consent of instructor. Throughout its history cinema has had a strong relation to avant-garde movements, usually in terms of direct influences (films made by members of these movements) or by more ambivalent relations of imitation or influence (going both ways: films which show the influence of various movements and avant-garde work that show the influence of film). This course will explore the manner in which a number of movements (as well as the concept of the avant-garde more generally) have related to the cinema, both in practice and theory. The following movements will be considered: Symbolism; Futurism (Italian and Russian); Dada; Constructivism; Surrealism; De Stijl. The Cineclub movement and magazines dedicated to the film and the avant-garde will also be studied. Readings will include manifestos and documents from the various movements, as well as historical studies; Texts by Poggioli and Burger will also be read. Films by Bauer, Lang, Wiene, Bragaglia, Eisenstein, Richter, Ruttmann, Vertov, Ivens, Dulac, Epstein and others will be shown.

History of International Cinema, Part II, Sound Era

28600
48600
ARTH 28600/38600, CMLT 22500/32500, COVA 26600, ENGL 29600/48900, MAPH 33700
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
Y. Tsivian

CMST 10100. This is the second part of the international survey history of film covering the sound era up to 1960. It is strongly recommended that students take the first section first. This course focuses on industrial practices and aesthetics during Hollywood s studio era (1927 to 1960) and alternatives to the Hollywood film, including French poetic realism, Italian neorealism, and Japanese cinema. We will also consider the important political, economic, social and cultural forces, which influenced Hollywood and other cinemas during this period, particularly the rise of fascism in the 1930s, WWII, Hollywood s postwar economic struggles, and various national new wave cinemas. Screenings will include films by Berkeley, Renoir, Huston, Welles, De Sica, Ozu, Hitchcock and Godard.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
Staff

Consent of instructor. Please register by faculty section.

Seminar: Drama, Theatre, Image, Performance

62200
CMLT 42600, ENGL 59301
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
L. Kruger

This PhD intensive reading course examines theoretical texts that deal with the interdisciplinary issues arising out of the confluence and conflict of word, image, and performance in various cultural contexts. Central concerns will include dramatic action, theatricality, visual and aural representation, and the competing phenomenologies of audience experiences of performance and cinema/video. We will be looking closely at the nature of drama and theatre, the mediation of performance through cinema and video, and the ways in which drama and theatricality manifest themselves in cultural activity more broadly. We will also scrutinize the ways on which metaphors of theatricality and performativity have been appropriated by other disciplines. Requirements: ACTIVE class participation; two presentations (P/F) and a short position paper (grade).

Seminar: The State of the Field in Chinese Film Studies

64602
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
Y. Zhang

This seminar examines the state of the field in Chinese film studies. We will focus on English scholarship and pursue weekly topics ranging from film historiography, cinema and modernity, ideology and politics, gender and sexuality, ethnicity and identity, trauma and memory, arts and auteurs, independent filmmaking, media industry, to transnational cinema and globalization. Readings are selected from scholars such as Chris Berry, David Bordwell, Yomi Braester, Nick Browne, Rey Chow, Paul Clark, Shuqin Cui, E. Miriam Hansen, Ann Kaplan, Sheldon Lu, Laikwan Pang, Paul Pickowicz, Ban Wang, Esther Yau, Xudong Zhang, Zhen Zhang, Ying Zhu, among others. We will pay as much attention to theoretical issues as to methodological and historical ones. Students are required to present in class, view recommended films, and write research papers.

Classical Film Theory

67200
ENGL 68600
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
J. Lastra

This course examines major texts in film theory from Vachel Lindsay and Hugo Muensterberg in the 1910s through Andre Bazin's writings in the 1940s and 1950s. We will devote special attention to the emergence of issues that continue to be of major importance, such as the film/language analogy, film semiotics, spectatorship, realism, montage, the modernism/mass culture debate, and the relationship between film history and film style. We will concentrate on the major theoretical writings of Muensterberg, Rudolf Arnheim, Jean Epstein, Sergei Eisenstein, Siegfried Kracauer, Bela Balazs, Bazin, as well as writings by Walter Benjamin, Germaine Dulac, Maya Deren, Jean Mitry, Vsevolod Pudovkin, and others.

Seminar: Cinema as Vernacular Modernism

67300
ENGL 58700
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2005-2006
M. Hansen

This course proceeds from the ostensible contradiction that Hollywood cinema at its most "classical," roughly from the late teens through the fifties, was also perceived, all over the world, as an incarnation of "the modern." We will begin with accounts of cinematic classicality in film history and criticism (Brasillach/Bardeche, Bazin), psychoanalytic-semiotic film theory (Metz, Bellour, Heath, Mulvey), as well as neoformalist-cognitivist approaches (Bordwell,Thompson, Carroll). We will look at films that both meet and exceed their categorization as classical and might more productively be described as a form of "vernacular modernism"—as aesthetic expressions of, and responses to, the social, psychic, and cultural experience of modernity and modernization. Drawing on texts by Kracauer, Benjamin, Epstein, Dulac, Colette, Woolf et al., we will consider the formal, stylistic, and thematic ways in which these films articulate a material sense of the everyday, a new image world, a restructuration of sensory perception, subjectivity, and cultural reception

Introduction to Film I

10100
ARTH 20000, COVA 25300, ENGL 10800, ISHU 20000
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
L. Carruthers

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

The Sexual Subject in Weimar Cinema

12301
HUMA 23501
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
D. Illet

The period between the World Wars in Germany, known as the Weimar Republic, arguably stands as the highpoint of German cinema: the years from 1918 to 1933 witnessed an incredible degree of technical and artistic achievement in filmmaking. Film critics and historians have written about the era obsessively, partly because of that degree of mastery. Beginning with the earliest works on Weimar cinema, however, film historians such as Siegfried Kracauer (From Caligari to Hitler, 1947) and Lotte Eisner (The Haunted Screen, 1969) have dealt with the ways in which film drew upon and influenced other art forms, reflected national psychology, and influenced society. More recent studies have emphasized and interrogated the problematic representations of sexuality and gender in films of the period. With their many sexualized monsters, doubles, femmes fatales, and cross-dressers and their thematization of vision and desire, these films suggest the highly contested nature of sexuality at the time. In this course we will view several of the key cinematic texts of the period (and some lesser known ones as well) and think critically about their depictions of gender, sexuality, power, and desire. We will also read contemporary documents as well as early and recent theoretical and historical works on the period that ask what sorts of sexual subjects Weimar cinema proposes.

Hindi Film of the 1940s and 1950s: Melodrama and Melancholy

14101
SALC 20501
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
B. Tiwari

This course examines Hindi film at a very particular juncture in Indian film history, through the works of three of the most illustrious directors of the so-called classical era, Mehboob Khan, Raj Kapoor, and Guru Dutt the latter two were also extremely popular actors. It is an attempt to look at Hindi film as film, and not as a socio-political text pregnant with ideological meaning. It is a course designed to understand the particular aesthetic logic and affect of popular Hindi cinema. It does this first by tracing the genealogy of film s arrival in the subcontinent, looking at the various changing aesthetic, political and social strands that converged to allow this and contributed to the particular mode of Hindi film, such as poetry and drama, colonialism and communalism. Each director s cinematic technique, structure and style will be studied in depth, with a particular attention to the relation of these films to what is understood as the melodramatic genre. Requirements: A weekly response paper (one page maximum) on the week's reading. A midterm paper: a close stude of one scene of any screened film. A final paper: a discussion of at least three films seen in the course, using one of the analytic methods studied.

Video Workshop

28903
COVA 23801
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
Staff

COVA 23800 or instructor consent; lab fee $60 billed directly on tuition bill. A production course geared towards experimental works and video within a studio art context. Screenings will include recent works by Harrison & Wood, Fischli & Weiss, Martin Kersels, Jane & Louise Wilson, Halflifers, Douglas Gordon and others. Discussions and readings will address non-narrative strategies, rapidly changing technology and viable approaches to producing video art in a world full of video images. Lab fee $60.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Jan Svankmajer and Contemporary Surrealism

26701
36701
CZEC 27900/37900, ISHU 27901/37901
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
M. Sternstein

The animator of Prague, Jan Svankmajer, is one of the greatest living advocates of Surrealism as a modus vivendi. The course studies intensively his life work, from films shorts such as Dimensions of Dialogue to feature films like the recent Conspirators of Pleasure and Little Otik, to his tactile poems and collages. We also read interviews with Svankmajer and his colleagues, essays on contemporary Surrealism, and critical works on the theory of the neo-avant-garde and the cultural situation of avant-garde art in East/Central Europe. The course is conducted in the style of a seminar with a strong focus on discussion and the requirement of one final paper or project.

Photography Workshop

27602
37602
COVA 24401/34401
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
L. Letinsky

COVA 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. A camera and a light meter are required. Using photographic materials, black & white or color, students focus on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed toward the production of a cohesive body of photographic work. An investigation of contemporary and historic art issues informs the students' exploration as does extensive darkroom work, gallery visits,critical readings, group and individual critiques, and presentations. Course can be taken several times as color and/or black and white, with series of projects developing and changing. Lab fee $60.

Advanced Black & White Photography

27701
37701
COVA 27802
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
L. Letinsky

COVA 10100COVA 10100 or 10200, and 24000 or 24100, or consent of instructor. Camera and light meter required. Throughout the quarter, students concentrate on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed towards the production of a cohesive body of black-and-white photographs. An investigation of contemporary and historic photographic issues informs the students' photographic practice and includes visits to local exhibitions, critical readings, darkroom techniques, and class and individual critiques. Visits to local exhibitions and darkroom work required. Lab fee $60.

Photography Workshop II

27702
37702
COVA 24402/34402
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
L. Letinsky

COVA 10100 or 10200; or consent of instructor. Camera and light meter required. Using photographic materials, black & white or color, students focus on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed toward the production of a cohesive body of photographic work. An investigation of contemporary and historic art issues informs the students' exploration as does extensive darkroom work, gallery visits,critical readings, group and individual critiques, and presentations. Course can be taken several times as color and/or black and white, with series of projects developing and changing. Lab fee $60.

Color Photography

27900
37900
COVA 24300
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
L. Letinsky

Course work is directed towards the investigation of color photographic materials, specifically with color negative film to make chromagenic prints. Students focus on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge. An investigation of contemporary and historic photographic issues informs the students exploration, as does extensive darkroom work, gallery visits, and class and individual critiques. Visits to local exhibitions and darkroom work required. Lab fee $60.

Documentary Video: Production Techniques

28001
38001
COVA 23902
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
J. Hoffman

COVA 23901 or consent of instructor This course focuses on the shaping and crafting of a nonfiction video. Sutdents are expected to write a treatment detailing their project. Production techniques concentrate on the handheld camera versus tripod, interviewing and microphone placement, and lighting for the interview. Post-production covers editing techniques and distribution strategies. Students then screen final projects in a public space.

Cinema and the Queer Avant-Garde, 1920 to 1950

20902
40902
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
R. Gregg

Through the films and written work of Kenneth Macpherson and the Pool Group, Jean Cocteau, Parker Tyler (and Charles Henri Ford), Joseph Cornell and others, we will construct a study of queer avant garde practice and content between WWI and WWII. We will also survey literary, artistic, religious, psychoanalytic, and other texts, which influenced these artists experimental practice and understandings of queer subjectivity.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
Staff

Consent of instructor. Please register by faculty section.

Seminar: Film and Melodrama

67102
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2005-2006
T. Gunning

This seminar will discuss the ambiguous and protean inheritance that film as a popular form received from 19th century stage melodrama. The stage tradition of melodrama, both in terms of play texts, and performance and staging practices, will be surveyed with readings of 19th century melodramas and descriptions of their staging. Peter Brooks' discussion of "The Melodramatic Imagination" will be crucial to the course, both as an account of the 19th century tradition and as a claim for melodrama as a form that moves across genres. The claim by scholars that 19th century melodramatic stage had inherent ties to cinema as posed by Vardac and critiqued by the recent work of Brewster and Jacobs will also be considered. Melodrama as a form in silent cinema, and as a genre of sound cinema, including its particular relation to the women's film will also be considered, with writings by Mulvey, Doane and others. Films will be screened by Griffith, Feuillade, Sjostrom, Hitchcock, Vidor, Ophuls and Sirk.

Introduction to Film I

10100
COVA 25300, ENGL 10800, ISHU 20000
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2004-2005
J. Stewart

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

(Re)Defining African American Cinema

21000
AFAM 21400, COVA 27901
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2004-2005
J. Stewart

What is "African American Cinema"? Must a film be produced by African Americans, feature a Black cast, or address a Black audience in order to be classified as an "African American film"? Is there a discernible Black film aesthetic? Can a Black film be produced within the Hollywood studio system? How important are these distinctions? This course examines a wide variety of films ("race movies" of the early 20th century; fiction films; documentaries; animation; films made for television and the Internet) to explore how notions of African American authorship, content and reception have been defined and redefined in relation to dominant and independent media histories and institutions.

Digital Imaging

28800
COVA 22500
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2004-2005
A. Ruttan

COVA 10100 or 10200, or consent of instructor. Using the Macintosh platform this course serves as an introduction to the use of digital technology as a means of making visual art. Instruction will cover Photo Shop's graphics program as well as digital imaging hardware (scanners, storage, and printing). In addition we will be addressing problems of color, design, collage, and drawing. Topics of discussion may include questions regarding the mediated image and its relationship to art as well as examining what constitutes the "real" in contemporary culture. Lab fee $60.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2004-2005
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

Senior Colloquium

29800
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2004-2005
J. Lastra

CMST 10100. Required of all Cinema and Media Studies concentrators. This seminar is designed to provide senior concentrators with a sense of the variety of methods and approaches in the field (such as formal analysis, cultural history, industrial history, reception studies, psychoanalysis). Students will present material relating to their B.A. project, which will be discussed in relation to the issues of the course.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2004-2005
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Film in India

24100
34100
ANTH 20600/31100, HIST 26700/36700, SALC 20500/30500
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2004-2005
R. Inden

Considers the film world from 1975 to the present. Most attention will be paid to the Hindi film and especially to its "peculiar" features, for example, the song and dance. Emphasis is placed on the reconstruction of film-related activities which can be taken as life practices from the stand point of "elites" and "masses," "middle classes," men and women, people in cities and villages, governmental institutions, businesses, and the "nation". The course will rely on people's notions of the everyday, festive days, paradise, arcadia and utopia to pose questions about how people try to realize their wishes and themselves through film. How film practices articulated with nationalism, first in the wake of a failing "socialist pattern of development," and, then, with "liberalization," of the promise or threat "free markets" would bring, will be the major concern. A brief look will also be taken at how film is related to other media such as television. Some comparisons with Hollywood will be made. Students will be asked to familiarize themselves with existing approaches to Indian film against the background of more general approaches to film and the media. Some knowledge of Hindi desirable but not required (films will be subtitled in English and have English synopses). One film per week will be shown. Requirement: One 10-page paper, written in two stages.

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