Lohengrin Laboratory: Opera, Dramaturgy, and Stage Practice

28304
38304
APS 28436, MUSI 39113/29113, GRMN 39113/29113
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2012-2013
Majel Connery (Executive Director, Opera Cabal, NYC/Chicago) and David Levin (Germanic Studies, Theater & Performance Studies, Cinema and Media Studies, and Director of the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry).

 

In 2014, the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) will stage a production of Salvatore Sciarrino's Lohengrin directed by Majel Connery, Executive Director of Opera Cabal, an experimental opera company based in New York City and Chicago. This team-taught, interdisciplinary seminar will serve as a laboratory for the production. The first half of the class explores in depth the work's genesis (Wagner's opera, *Lohengrin*) and subsequent adaptation (a short story by Symbolist poet Jules Laforgue which, in turn, is re-adapted for opera by Sciarrino). As a class we will cultivate a fluency with the theoretical stakes of these multiple *Lohengrins* (including Alain Badiou's and Adorno's writings on Wagner, Michel Poizat on voice, and Slavoj Zizek/Mladen Dolar on opera, voice and the gaze) in order, finally, to develop a suite of mini-Lohengrins-group-based scenic reflections and solutions. No previous experience staging opera is expected, although an interest in exploring the intersection of textual exegesis, conceptual analysis, and stage practice is essential.  Students with an interest in any of the following are especially welcome: contemporary music, performance theory, dramaturgy, design, and/or directing.  

Feminist Theory and Counter-Cinema

20202
40202
FREN 22213, FREN 32213, GNSE 20208, GNSE 30308
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2012-2013
Jennifer Wild

Feminism in Great Britain, France, and America has produced a rigorous intellectual, theoretical, and aesthetic legacy within the field of film studies. This course will explore the central debates of feminist psychoanalytic film theory (the patriarchal unconscious; Hollywood narrative; the gaze; genre; visual/female pleasure; masochism; the female spectator; resistant spectators) and criticism as we also integrate the contemporary movement of feminist historiography into our central mode of inquiry. The theoretical debates surrounding the critique of language, the question of feminine writing, cinécriture, and the female author will inform our investigation of the radical aesthetics of feminist counter cinema. Films include: Queen Christina; Orlando; Craig’s Wife; Le Bonheur; Vertigo; Hiroshima, Mon Amour; Mahogany; Salome; Fuses; Riddles of the Sphynx; Film About a Woman Who...; Jeanne Dielman; Tapage Nocturne; Sex is Comedy.

T/TH 12:00-1:20 C310 
screening: Thursday 3:30 - 6:30 C307

History of International Cinema, Part II: Sound Era to 1960

28600
48600
ARTH 28600, ARTH 38600, CMLT 22500, CMLT 32500, ENGL 29600, ENGL 48900, MAPH 33700, ARTV 26600
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2012-2013
Tom Gunning

The center of this course is film style, from the classical scene breakdown to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation, and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting). The development of a film culture is also discussed. Texts include Thompson and Bordwell's Film History: An Introduction; and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, and Godard. Screenings include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

Course: MW 1:30-2:50, LC 201
Screening: M 7:00-10:00, LC 201

Neo-Avant-Wave: Post-War Film Experiment in France

63701
63701
FREN 43713, ARTH 43701
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2012-2013
Jennifer Wild

The New Wave. The Neo-Avant Garde. Rarely have these film and art movements been placed into an explicit historical or theoretical dialog or dialectic. It will be the task of this seminar to do just that. We will begin our study with a brief look into the pre-WWII situation of radical art and film movements, and classic theories of the avant-garde and neo-avant-garde. Turning our attention to the rise of Lettrism within the context of post-war film and art culture, we will subsequently evaluate the conditions that surrounded the emergence of New Wave filmmaking and criticism, and that include the Situationist International and Nouveau Réalisme. As we move toward and beyond the events of May 1968, we will bring our study of social documentary, politically militant forms, collective film and art practices, and historiography to bear on purportedly stable understandings of the New Wave, its art historical forebearers, and its heirs. Reading knowledge of French is required. While some of our texts will appear in English translation, many will not. The seminar will be conducted in English, but the last thirty minutes of each session will be conducted in French. This component is intended to improve students’ oral proficiency, but it will not be used in student evaluation. Screenings are mandatory. With some possible exceptions, films will be subtitled. Students enrolled in FREN 43713 will be required to complete all reading and writing in French.

Friday 1:30 - 4:20 C310
screening: Tues 3:30- 6:30 LC201

Theory, Media, and the Moving Image in Japan

64903
64903
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2012-2013
Phil Kaffen

This course sets out to explore the history and present of film and media theory in Japan. To that end, we will engage close readings of translated writings spanning the 20th century and into the 21st. The course is most centrally focused on cinema as the predominant moving image art or technology for much of the 20th century. We will explore its relationship to sociological issues such as economy, technology, and mass consumption, as well as philosophical and aesthetic issues of subjectivity, time and space, mediation, and representation. At the same time, we will attempt to situate such writings within a broader constellation of writings on literature, philosophy, photography, animation, and new media in Japan, and when possible, Western film and media theory. The emphasis in the class is on readings, but there will be a screening component as well. No Japanese language ability is required.

Course: MW 1:30-2:50, C 310
Screening: M 3:30-6:30, C 307

Classical Film Theory

67200
67200
ENGL 68600
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2012-2013
Jim Lastra

This course examines major texts in film theory from Vachel Lindsay and Hugo Münsterberg in the 1910s through André Bazin's writings in the 1940s and 1950s. We will devote special attention to the emergence of issues that continue to be of major importance, such as the film/language analogy, film semiotics, spectatorship, realism, montage, the modernism/mass culture debate, and the relationship between film history and film style. We will concentrate on the major theoretical writings of Münsterberg, Rudolf Arnheim, Jean Epstein, Sergei Eisenstein, Siegfried Kracauer, Bela Balazs, Bazin, as well as writings by Walter Benjamin, Germaine Dulac, Maya Deren, Jean Mitry, Vsevolod Pudovkin, and others.

Course: W 3:00-5:50, LC 801
Screening: W 7:00-10:00, LC 201

Introduction to Film

10100
ARTH 20000, ARTV 25300, ENGL 10800
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Dong Liang

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Course: MW 1:30-2:50, LC 201
Screening: T 7:00-10:00, C 307

Introduction to Film

10100
ARTH 20000, ARTV 25300, ENGL 10800
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Clint Froehlich

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Course: TR 10:30-11:50, C 307
Screening: T 7:00-10:00, C 307

Advanced Editing

33940
23940
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Jerry Blumenthal and Jim Morrissette

 

This course, taught by film professionals, is designed to move video projects that are already shot or in rough cut form, to completion, or to have made significant enough progress to earn a grade.  It will focus on the techniques of editing all genres of media.  Students will learn advanced editing techniques on Final Cut Pro 7, including media management, sound sweetening, color correction, and prepping for distribution.  Attention will be paid to integrating the theory and practice of montage.  Students should be prepared on the first day of class, to screen 10 minutes of footage and discuss their projects, in order to demonstrate their readiness to be in the class.  Students will be expected to have their own hard drives.  Prerequisites include junior, senior or graduate status, and a working knowledge of Final Cut Pro.  Cinema and Media Studies and Visual Arts students will be given priority for enrollment.

Fridays 10am to 1:30pm

Comparative Media Poetics: Cinema and Videogames

29003
29003
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Ian Jones

Cinema and videogames are two moving-image-based media, and, especially over the past two decades, each has been credited with influencing the other. But how deep do their similarities actually go? This course will investigate the raw materials and basic forms at the disposal of videogame developers and filmmakers, and analyze how these materials and forms shape viewer and player responses. In what way do the possibilities available to game developers differ from those available to filmmakers? How does each medium segment and present space, time, and action? What aesthetic effects are open to games that are not open to cinema, and vice versa? What have practitioners in each medium learned from those of the other, and have some of these lessons perhaps been misapplied? All of these questions and more will be fair game for the investigations ahead, which will consist of an examination of films alongside games—including entries from the Uncharted franchise, the Half-Life franchise, and with a special focus on horror games (especially the Resident Evil and Silent Hill series).

Course: MW 1:30-2:50, LC 028
Screening: M 7:00-10:00, LC 201

Women Mystery Writers: From Page to Screen

20101
30101
GNDR 20202
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Rebecca West

Many distinguished filmmakers have found inspiration in mystery novels written by women. In this course we shall read novels by Patricia Highsmith (Strangers on a Train, The Talented Mr. Ripley, Ripley's Game), Ruth Rendell (Tree of Hands, The Bridesmaid, Live Flesh), and, time permitting, Laura by Vera Caspary, Bunny Lake is Missing by Evelyn Piper, and Mischief by Charlotte Armstrong, and we shall analyze the films based on these novels, directed by such luminaries as Hitchcock. Chabrol, Caviani, Clément, Wenders, Almodóvar, Preminger, and others. Among topics of particular interest are: techniques of film adaptation; transnational dislocations from page to screen; the problematics of gender; and the transformations of "voice" understood both literally and mediatically.

Course: TR 1:30-2:50, C 310
Screening: T 3:30-6:30, C 425

From Post-war to Post-wall: A History of Polish Film

24404
34404
POLI 22400/32400
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Kinga Kosmala

This course will explore post-World War II film from Poland – approaching the works both as examples of the cinematic art in the region, and as a lens through which to view developments and transformations in East European culture. We will view ten films by most renowned directors from Poland. The course will assess what the end of World War II, followed by joining the Eastern Bloc, the fall of communism, and finally by the entry into post-Soviet Europe have meant for the film culture and the Polish national film tradition. We will also consider how Eastern European cinematic discourse is undergoing – or should undergo – revision, viewing it as an increasingly transnational phenomenon, rather than the example of a national film industry. The films will be viewed in the original language with English subtitles. 

 

class: TU/TH 10:30 - 11:50am, C425
scr:  WE 3:30 - 6:30, C307

Making Sense of a Moving World: Japanese Cinema Through 1945

24913
34913
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Phil Kaffen

The aim of this course is to explore a variety of filmmaking practices in relation to historical and cultural trends in Japan from the 1910s to the end of the Second World War. While we will watch films of the great auteurs such as Mizoguchi, Ozu, and Naruse, the increasing number of subtitled films and DVDs of prewar Japanese cinema allows for unprecedented access to a wide variety of filmmaking practices. Hence, in addition to auteur films, we will watch old-school period films and adaptations from popular literature, high speed nihilistic action films, socialist “tendency” films, critical documentaries, melodramas, experimental film and animation, and wartime propaganda. Along with the films, we will read writings on film by a range of thinkers and artists to engage with a variety of issues, including gender, realism, modernism, propaganda, human/animal, violence, and mass culture. We will look at the ways cinema, as both a participant in and a unique reflection on modernity, fundamentally transformed the relationship of Japan to the world.

Course: TR 12:00-1:20, LC 201
Screening: W 7:00-10:00, LC 201

Hitchcock: The Language of Narrative Desire

26501
36501
GNSE 26503
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Tom Gunning

No single filmmaker has equaled Alfred Hitchcock’s combination of popular success, critical commentary and widespread influence on other filmmakers. Currently, his work is so familiar it threatens to be taken for granted. This course will reveal Hitchcock as the filmmaker who systematically used the stylistics of late silent film to forge a dialectical approach to the so-called Classical Style. Hitchcock devised a relation among narrative, spectator and character point of view, yielding a configuration of suspense, sensation and perception. Tracing Hitchcock’s career chronologically, we will follow his intertwining of sexual desire and gender politics, and his reshaping of melodrama according to Freudian concepts of repression, memory, interpretation and abreaction, as he navigates from silent film to sound and from Great Britain to Hollywood. Students must have taken Introduction to Film, and preferably Film History 1.

Course: TR 1:30-2:50, LC 201
Screening: T 3:30-6:30, LC 201

Non-Fiction Film: Representation and Performance

28200
38200
HMRT 25101,ARTV 25100,ARTV 35100,HMRT 35101
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Judy Hoffman

We will attempt to define Non-Fiction cinema by examining its major modes. These include the Documentary, Essay, Ethnographic, and Political/Agit-prop film, as well as personal/autobiographical and Experimental works that are less easily classifiable. We will explore some of the theoretical discourses that surround this most philosophical of film genres, such as the ethics and politics of representation, and the shifting lines between fact and fiction, truth and reality. The relationship between the Documentary and the State will be examined in light of the genre’s tendency to inform and instruct. We will consider the tensions of filmmaking and the performative aspects in front of the lens, as well as the performance of the camera itself. Finally, we will look at the ways in which distribution and television effect the production and content of Non-fiction film.

Course: MW 1:30-2:50, C 425
Screening: M 7:00-10:00, C 307

The Face on Film

63002
ARTH 43002, CMLT 43002
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2012-2013
Noa Steimatsky

The seminar will discuss the workings of the face –as figure of subjectivity, as imprint of identity, as privileged object of representation, as mode and ethic of address – through film theory and practice. How has cinema responded to the mythic and iconic charge of the face, to the portrait’s exploration of model and likeness, identity and identification, the revelatory and masking play of expression, the symbolic and social registers informing the human countenance? At this intersection of archaic desires and contemporary anxieties, the face will serve as our medium by which to reconsider, in the cinematic arena, some of the oldest questions on the image. Among the filmmakers and writers who will inform our discussion are Balázs, Epstein, Kuleshov, Dreyer, Pasolini, Hitchcock, Warhol, Bresson, Bazin, Barthes, Doane, Aumont, Didi-Huberman, and others.

Course: W 10:30-1:20, C 310
Screening: M 3:30-6:30, LC 201

Introduction to Film Analysis

10100
ARTH 20000,ENGL 10800,ARTV 25300
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
J. Lastra

Required of students majoring in Cinema and Media Studies This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles

Brecht and Beyond

26200
CMLT 20800, ENGL 24400, ISHU 26950
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
L. Kruger

Brecht is indisputably the most influential playwright in the twentieth century. This course explores the range and variety of Brecht's own theater, from the anarchic plays of the 1920s to the agitprop Lehrstück to the classical parable plays, as well as the works of his heirs in Germany (Heiner Müller, Franz Xaver Kroetz, and Peter Weiss), Britain (John Arden, Edward Bond, and Caryl Churchill), and sub-Saharan Africa (Soyinka, Ngugi, and various South African theater practitioners). We also consider the impact of Brechtian theory on film, from Brecht's own Kuhle Wampe to Jean-Luc Godard.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

Senior Colloquium

29800
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
X. Dong

CMST 10100. Required of all Cinema and Media Studies majors. This seminar is designed to provide senior concentrators with a sense of the variety of methods and approaches in the field (such as formal analysis, cultural history, industrial history, reception studies, psychoanalysis). Students will present material relating to their B.A. project, which will be discussed in relation to the issues of the course.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Contemporary Scandinavian Cinema

26502
36502
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
E. Rossaak

This course is a survey of contemporary Scandinavian cinema from the 1960s until today. Some of the most influential Scandinavian directors in the auteur tradition from Ingmar Bergman to Lars von Trier will be critically explored. We will focus on their experimental styles and the way they technically treat intimacy, trauma, sex and politics, feminism, self-reflexivity, the melodramatic, experiments in genre and the documentary. We will also interrogate their influences going back to both the Kammerspiel (chamber drama) of Henrik Ibsen and August Strindberg and the films of Carl Th. Dreyer. All readings are in English. Screenings by Bergman, Dreyer, Sjöman, Løchen, Breien, von Trier, Vinterberg, Scherfig, Moodysson, Andersson, Olin and Johnson among others.

Non-fiction Film: Representations and Performance

28200
38200
ARTV 25100/35100, HMRT 25101
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
J. Hoffman

We will attempt to define Non-Fiction cinema by looking at the history of its major modes. These include the Documentary, Essay, Ethnographic, and Agit-prop film, as well as Personal/autobiographical and Experimental works that are less easily classifiable. We will explore some of the theoretical discourses that surround this most philosophical of film genres, such as the ethics and politics of representation, and the shifting lines between fact and fiction, truth and reality. The relationship between the Documentary and the State will be examined in light of the genre's tendancy to inform and instruct. We will consider the tensions of filmmaking and the performative aspects in front of the lens, as well as the performance of the camera itself. Finally, we will look at the ways in which distribution and television effect the production and content of non-fiction film.

Methods and Issues in Cinema Studies

40000
ENGL 48000, MAPH 33000
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
N. Steimatsky

This course offers an introduction to ways of reading, writing on, and teaching film. The focus of discussion will range from methods of close analysis and basic concepts of film form, technique and style; through industrial/critical categories of genre and authorship (studios, stars, directors); through aspects of the cinema as a social institution, psycho-sexual apparatus and cultural practice; to the relationship between filmic texts and the historical horizon of production and reception. Films discussed will include works by Griffith, Lang, Hitchcock, Deren, Godard.

History of International Cinema, Part I, Silent Era

28500
48500
ARTH 28500/38500, CMLT 22400/32400, COVA 26500, ENGL 29300/48700, MAPH 33600
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
J. Lastra

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

The Archival Turn in Film and Media Studies

66500
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
E. Rossaak

This seminar will map and critically explore the current expansion of notions of the archive into areas beyond the classical archive, to art, philosophy, film and new media practices. Why is the term archive so attractive now? On the one hand, new technologies have turned the preservation, manipulation and dissemination of traces into a cultural obsession affecting both everyday life and global politics. On the other hand, significant theoretical and media archaeological work has been done on modern storage and recording devices affecting our research. We will bring these practices and theories together, as we explore older and newer models of the archive (from Albert Kahn's Archives de la Planète to YouTube), features like Memento and The Final Cut, found footage films and art installations (from Joseph Cornell to Natalie Bookchin). The material will be in part determined by the interests of the group. Reading will include Benjamin, Kittler, Freud, Foucault, Derrida, Doane, Foster, Ernst, Amad, Fossati and others. All readings in English.

Transitional Spaces in Postwar Cinemas

67001
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2011-2012
N. Steimatsky

The seminar draws its title from Winnicott's notion of "transitional space," developed when he was treating displaced children in the aftermath of World War II. We will explore the unsettled and unsettling, in-between spaces that inform the cinematic imaginary of that era: ruins, makeshift shelters, places marked by destruction and displacement, and the fraught sites of reconstruction. For this is also where new spaces opened up for cinematic exploration in that era: what sense of self, and what consciousness of the image was afforded here? Focusing primarily on Italy, Germany, France, the UK and the US (with glimpses elsewhere), we will interlace screenings, readings, and discussion of the historical, physical, social, and psychic experience of that period, that saw the disappearance of people, the devastation and remaking of everyday life. Readings will draw on Spender, Judt, Schivelbusch, Sebald, Primo Levi, Morante, Arendt, Didi-Huberman, Deleuze, and Shoshana Felman, among others. We will view both documentary and fiction films by such makers as Rossellini, Staudte, Radvánji, Franju, Fuller, Jennings, Antonioni, Resnais, and Melville.

Visual Language: On Time and Space

10300
ARTV 10300, TAPS 23400
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
C. Sullivan

Through studio work and critical discussion on four-dimensional form, this course is designed to reveal the conventions of the moving image, performance, and the production of digital-based media. Basic formal elements and principles of art are presented, but also put into practice to reveal perennial issues in a visual field. Form is studied as a means to communicate content. Topics as varied as but not limited to narrative, mechanical reproduction, verisimilitude, historical tableaux, time and memory, the body politic, and the role of the author can be illuminated through these primary investigations. Visits to museums and other fieldwork required, as is participation in studio exercises and group critiques

The Hollywood Western in Context

21404
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
M. Hauske

Studies of Hollywood genres typically proceed by isolating a genre and studying its conventions and characteristics over time: important auteurs, stars, and characters; the function of character types, situations, or settings; the representation of women, minorities, and other historically under-represented groups; and articulations of national identity are common considerations. These characteristics change over time—John Ford gives way to Sam Peckinpah, the musical gives way to the music video, Humphrey Bogart metamorphoses into Elliot Gould. This course seeks to study one Hollywood genre in its natural habitat. How did the western in the postwar era resonate and overlap with, inspire and oppose, respond and react to other genres, cinemas, and cultural forms? The course will include comedies, parodies, and musicals; other genres of violence like film noir and the gangster film; the place of the western on a global and international scale; and its spillage into material culture and emerging forms and practices like television, comic books, automobile tourism, and camping. Our goals are to better understand what westerns looked like when juxtaposed against contemporaneous and competing films and leisure practices. Designed with upper-level undergraduates in mind, this class will emphasize historical research and will culminate in a reception study of a single film. Grades will be based on written work and on student presentations of ongoing research during the second half of the quarter. M. Hauske. Winter.

Cinema, Immersion, and Virtual Travel

27001
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
C. Williamson

This course examines the nineteenth- and twentieth-century history of virtual travel as a major form of immersive entertainment, a history that includes such diverse media as the travel film, World’s Fairs, panoramas, ride simulators, virtual reality, and widescreen cinema formats like IMAX. Using the idea that these media have been linked by historians based on their uncanny capacities for simulating the experiences and sensations of “real” travel, we will explore how such technologies are organized specifically around the concept of “being there without being there.” While one of our primary concerns will be orienting the cinema within this context, we will also survey the relevance of immersive media to understanding what we might call “alternative” modes of spectatorship (embodied, participatory, and interactive), contemporary experiences like tourism and imperialism, and theories of education and ways of producing knowledge about the modern world.

Classical Film Theory

27201
ENGL 18600
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
J. Lastra

This course examines major texts in film theory from Vachel Lindsay and Hugo Münsterberg in the 1910s through André Bazin's writings in the 1940s and 1950s. We will devote special attention to the emergence of issues that continue to be of major importance, such as the film/language analogy, film semiotics, spectatorship, realism, montage, the modernism/mass culture debate, and the relationship between film history and film style.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Critical Videogame Studies

32320
ENGL 32320
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
P. Jagoda

Since the 1960s, videogames have developed into to the world’s most profitable entertainment media. From the Cold War era single-player combat simulation Spacewar! to the massively multiplayer online game World of Warcraft, digital games have had profound social and cultural impacts. In this course, students will analyze the design, social dynamics, and formal properties of videogames. We will begin with literary and cinematic depictions of games.

Creative Thesis Workshop

23905
33905
ARTV 23905, ARTV 33905
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
J. Hoffman

CMST 23930; CMST 23931 or 27600; departmental approval of senior creative thesis project. This seminar will focus on how to craft a creative thesis in film or video. Works-in-progress will be screened each week, and technical and structural issues relating to the work will be explored. The workshop will also develop the written portion of the creative thesis. The class is limited to seniors from CMS and DOVA, and MAPH students working on a creative thesis

Documentary Production II

23931
33931
ARTV 23931,ARTV 33931
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
J. Hoffman

CMST 23930 or ARTV 23930. This 100 unit course is taught over Winter and Spring. This course focuses on the shaping and crafting of a nonfiction video. Students are expected to write a treatment detailing their project. Production techniques focus on the handheld camera versus tripod, interviewing and microphone placement, and lighting for the interview. Postproduction covers editing techniques and distribution strategies. Students then screen final projects in a public space

Image/World/Ozu

24911
34911
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
P. Kaffen

As with many clichés, the notion that the “language of film is universal” has remarkable tenacity. Yet, what does it mean to make this claim? How is it related to a globalized or transnational world and the role of art and images within it? In this class, we will take up these problems through an examination of the filmmaker Yasujirō Ozu in relation to “global cinema.” Long addressed as the most “traditional” and “Japanese” of filmmakers, Ozu has more recently become among the most common reference points in the international art house circuit. Hence, “Ozu” may pose particular historical problems for a discussion of universalism and globalization. Is there something that can explain this remarkable transformation from the most particular and traditional to the most universal and modern? Does this “global” shift in his image accord with or alter his reception in Japan? Is it content, form, technique, movement, or something else that is at stake when we talk about “Ozu” in the world? How might “Ozu” illuminate the assumptions of modernism (political or vernacular) versus tradition or function as a critique of the modern as global or universal? We will pursue these questions in this class through an examination of works by Ozu from throughout his career. In addition, we will watch a series of film homages to and influences on “Ozu” by a panoply of internationally feted filmmakers including Wim Wenders, Hou Hsiaou Hsien, Claire Denis, Abbas Kiarostami, and Jim Jarmusch.

Symbolism and Cinema

25514
35514
RUSS 26500,RUSS 36500
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
R. Bird

In his 1896 essay on cinema, Russian writer Maxim Gorky described the new medium to "madness or symbolism." The connection between cinema and symbolism was not surprising insofar as symbolism was a dominant aesthetic paradigm throughout Europe at the time. However it does suggest (perhaps surprisingly) that from the very beginning cinema was seen as a means of visualizing the non-rational, uncanny and even invisible. This course examines the relationship between symbolism and cinema with particular attention to French and Russian writings and films. Examining how symbolist aesthetics became applied to the cinematic medium, we will pay particular attention the resources it provided for conceptualizing the uncanny and the mystical. We will question whether there exists a distinct symbolist tradition in film history and how it relates to notions of poetic or experimental cinema. Films will represent a broad cross-section of European (and some American) cinema, from Jean Epstein to Sergei Eisenstein and Alexander Dovzhenko, and from Stan Brakhage to Andrei Tarkovsky

Ernst Lubitsch: An International Style

26302
36302
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
X. Dong

“How would Lubitsch do it?” Such reads the famous sign on Billy Wilder’s office door. True to the spirit of Lubitsch, this sign visualizes a question asked by generations of filmmakers around the world, most likely including Lubitsch himself. In a career spanning nearly three decades, Lubitsch’s name has come to denote a style about style, first exported from Germany to Hollywood and then from Hollywood to the world. In this sense, Lubitsch is first and foremost a filmmaker for filmmakers, and his style decidedly an international one. It is the goal of this course to examine a broadly defined international stylistic history developed by and associated with Lubitsch, whose legacy cannot be adequately assessed without such a perspective. With a dual emphasis on formal and historical analysis, we will look at Lubitsch’s early Weimar comedy and epic films, American silent masterpieces, musicals, sound comedies, and political farces, as well as Lubitsch-esque films made by Yasujiro Ozu, Zhu Shilin, and Jean Luc Godard.

Cinema of Catastrophe & Resistance: Readings in Cultural & Aesthetic Theory

27412
37412
GRMN 27412,GRMN 37412,TAPS 28450
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2011-2012
D. Levin

This course examines a series of filmic, dramatic, literary, and site-specific commemorative works which engage the conjunction of narrative representation, historical catastrophe, and political as well as aesthetic resistance. Our consideration of these works will be augmented by a series of critical essays on the limits of representation, the problematics of mediation and aesthetic adequation, the possibilities of commemoration, and the promises of aesthetic resistance. In addition, we will consider a number of theoretical works on the operations of cinematic identification and narrative comprehension that are important to an understanding of the formal operations of film, theater, and poetry. The course will be conducted in English and no fluency in German or the languages of cultural and film criticism is required. However, it is designed for graduates and advanced undergraduates who have a particular interest in (and, ideally, are familiar with) some combination of cultural theory, aesthetic theory, and/or film theory; those who possess no knowledge of any of these fields should consult the instructor before signing up for the course.

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