American Avant-garde Film

25200
ENGL 286
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
J. Ma

This course will introduce students to the tradition of independent, experimental cinema in North America. From the relatively isolated pre-war contributions of James Sibley Watson and Melville Webber, Douglass Crockwell, Ralph Steiner, Joseph Cornell, and Robert Florey to the more concentrated post-war emergence of Maya Deren, Stan Brakhage, Sidney Peterson, Kenneth Anger, Harry Smith, and Bruce Conner, North America has consistently supported an artisanal, independent, avant-garde film culture. While rarely reaching the level of mass popularity, this film community has developed a richness and complexity equal to what we find in painting and music -- arts with which it has often been in conversation. This course will concentrate on periods of greatest visibility and impact -- the 1960s and 1970s -- examining the development of underground film, personal cinema, "expanded cinema," minimalism, and structural film, paying particular attention to film’s interaction with other arts. We will end by taking stock or recent developments in the 1980s and 1990s. Filmmakers will include Christopher MacLaine, Michael Snow, Ernie Gehr, Andy Warhol, Joyce Wieland, Ken Jacobs, Jack Smith, Hollis Frampton, Carolee Schneeman, Yvonne Rainer, Morgan Fischer, Abigail Child, Martin Arnold, Lewis Klahr, Su Friedrich, and Brian Frye.

Radical Interpretation on Stage and Screen

27800
CMSTG 378, CompLit, German, GsHum 246/346, MAPH, Music 222/346
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
D. Levin

The history and aesthetics of radical interpretation of canonical works in theater, opera, film. Examination of aesthetic tracts (e.g. Appia, Artaud, Brecht, Peter Brooks), theory (Barthes, Derrida, E. Diamond, Foucault), as well as modern forays into radical interpretation (e.g. Derek Jarman/Marlowe’s Edward II, Patrice Chereau/Wagner’s Ring, Peter Sellers/Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Baz Luhrmann’s William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet, Sally Potter’s Thriller, and recent work by the Wooster Group).

Musicals: Staging Everyday Worlds

27900
CMST 379, Anthro, ENGL 295/435, German, Music 227/305, GSHum 210/310
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
P. Bohlman and K. Trumpener

CMST 379, Anthro, ENGL 295/435, German, Music 227/305, GSHum 210/310

Brecht and Beyond

28400
CompLit, ENGL 244, German 244
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
L. Kruger

Brecht is indisputably the most influential playwright in the 20th century but his influence on cinema is just as powerful. In this course we will explore the range and variety of Brecht’s own theatre, from the anarchic plays and agitprop film and theatre of the 1920’s to the classical parable plays, as well as the work of his heirs in Germany (Heiner Müller, Franz Xaver Kroetz, Peter Weiss), Britain (John Arden, Edward Bond, Caryl Churchill), and Subsaharan Africa (Soyinka, Ngugi, and various South African theatre practitioners). We will also consider the impact of Brechtian theory on film, from Brecht’s own Kuhle Wampe to Jean-Luc Godard, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Alexander Kluge, and Djibril Diop Mambety.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies:Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Italian Americana: Literature and Cinema

33200
CMST 232, CMST 232, GsHum, Ital 289/389
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
R. West

A study of the history and culture of Italian-Americans through filmic and literary representations. Writers include Helen Barolini, Tina De Rosa, Giose Rimanelli, and Ed McBain (Savatore Lambino); directors include Coppola, Scorsese, Savoca, Cimino, and Ferrara.

Eric Rohmer

33700
CMST 237, French 292
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
N. Herpe

The films of Rohmer will be studied as a new "Comedie humaine," offering a rich gallery of the faces of France from the 60s to the 90s, from "La Collectionneuse" to "Conte d’automne..." and, according to his first reviews in "Cahiers du cinema," as a cinematographic work which could rediscover in its own way the liberty of a literary creation (especially in "adaptations" like "La Marquise d’O" and "Perceval le Gallois"). This course will be taught in English.

Radical Interpretation on Stage and Screen

37800
CMST 278, ComLit 207/307, German 246/346, GsHum 246/346, MAPH, Music 222/302
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
D. Levin

The history and aesthetics of radical interpretation of canonical works in theater, opera, film. Examination of aesthetic tracts (e.g. Appia, Artaud, Brecht, Peter Brooks), theory (Barthes, Derrida, E. Diamond, Foucault), as well as modern forays into radical interpretation (e.g. Derek Jarman/Marlowe’s Edward II, Patrice Chereau/Wagner’s Ring, Peter Sellers/Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Baz Luhrmann’s _William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet_, Sally Potter’s Thriller, and recent work by the Wooster Group).

Musicals: Staging Everyday Worlds

37900
CMST 279, Anthro, ENGL 295/435, German, Music 227/305, GSHum 210/310
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
P. Bohlman and K. Trumpener

When movie characters break into song, they express emotion and create community, comment on everyday life and escape or transcend it. Musicals straddle the utopian world of the screen and the popular, lay performances of high schools and community theaters. This course considers the genre’s formal, cultural, social, and performative dimensions (from its conventions of sound, dance, and color, to its representations of race, ethnicity, and cultural contact). Films will range from early American and European musicals (The Jazz Singer, Le Million, Three from the Gas Station, and Volga Volga) to Yiddish and immigrant musical theater (The Dybbuk and West-Side Story) to classic Hollywood films (Shall We Dance, Showboat, A Star Is Born, Oklahoma, and Singing in the Rain) to revisionist music films (Umbrellas of Cherbourg, Window Shopping, Killer of Sheep, Latcho Drom, Buena Vista Social Club).

Seminar: The Sentimental

61600
ENGL 639
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
J. Chandler

This seminar will give advanced students a chance to pursue research and criticism over a range of periods and objects of study. The broad topic will be the theory and practice of the sentimental over the course of nearly three centuries, on stage, page, and screen. In addition to looking at the philosophical treatments of the sentiments in Shaftesbury, Hume, and Smith, and critical discussions of the "sentimental" as a literary mode (in Schiller), we will look at sentimental comedy, sentimental fiction, and sentimental cinema. Since the sentimental is inevitably a mode of mediated affective exchange, the place of the media and of translation between media, will have special importance in the course. Primary works by such figures Steele, Sterne, MacKenzie, Charlotte Smith, William Hall Brown, the poets of sensibility and Romanticism, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Dickens, D.W. Griffith, Frank Capra, Douglas Sirk, and others. Secondary works from the burgeoning field of "sensibility studies." Seminar presentation and paper.

Seminar: 19th Century Cinema

64000
ArtH 452, ENGL 636
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
T. Gunning

Consent of Instructor Although frequently described as the art form of the twentieth century, cinema was in fact invented at the end of the nineteenth century and is in many ways the product of that century in terms of technology, narrative and visual forms, social and political contexts, and philosophical and aesthetic preoccupations. This seminar will explore the nineteenth century visual forms that contributed to the cinema (photography, panoramas, dioramas, stereoscopy, magic lantern shows); its mechanical invention and institutional origins; its place within Nineteenth century amusements (vaudeville, melodrama, dance, comic strips). The place of the earliest cinema within what Walter Benjamin terms the "topoi of modernity" (the modern urban streets, the department store, the world expositions, ) will also be explored. Screening of the first films will be undertaken to determine aesthetic strategies, genres, and relations to other forms. Students should have some background in nineteenth century culture and some idea of aspects they would like to research in relation to cinema. Works by Simmel, Benjamin, Crary, Hansen, Singer, and others will be read.

Seminar: Frankfurt School on Cinema, Modernity, and Mass Culture

67500
ENGL 687
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2000-2001
M. Hansen

Background in film theory or at least one course in cinema studies In this seminar, we will consider debates on film and mass culture in the tradition of the Frankfurt School (or, more precisely, Critical Theory), focusing mainly on Siegfried Kracauer, Walter Benjamin, and Theodor W. Adorno. Discussions will revolve around the following issues: the impact of technology on artistic practices as well as the institution of art; consumerism and new forms of subjectivity and reception; ideology and the "culture industry"; the transformation of the "public sphere" and the democratization of culture; the role of gender and sexuality. We will consider these debates both in their historical, political, and philosophical contexts and in their relevance to current debates in film theory and cultural studies. Texts will be read in translation, but reading knowledge of German would be highly useful.

Introduction to Film I

10100
ArtH 190, CMS 101, COVA 253, ENGL 108, GS Hum 200
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
T. Gunning

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The first part introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Introduction to Film I

10100
ArtH 190, CMS 101, COVA 253, ENGL 108, GS Hum 200
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
T. Gunning

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The first part introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Opera and Screen

28300
Music 221
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
M. Feldman

Any 100-level music course or consent of instructor This course explores opera of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries, with special attention to cinematic interpretations. Critical questions it will raise include how the conjunction of these two media -- staged and filmic -- has been negotiated; how a variety of "texts" (verbal, musical, visual) intersect as opera is realized in film; and how filmed opera attracts and shapes different modes of spectatorship from staged opera. Among the operas to be considered are Mozart's The Magic Flute (Ingmar Bergman), Mozart's Don Giovanni (Joseph Losey), Verdi's La Traviata (Franco Zefferelli), Bizet's Carmen (Francesco Rosi), and Brecht/Weill Three Penny Opera (G. W. Pabst).

Opera and Screen

28300
Music 221
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
M. Feldman

Any 100-level music course or consent of instructor This course explores opera of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries, with special attention to cinematic interpretations. Critical questions it will raise include how the conjunction of these two media -- staged and filmic -- has been negotiated; how a variety of "texts" (verbal, musical, visual) intersect as opera is realized in film; and how filmed opera attracts and shapes different modes of spectatorship from staged opera. Among the operas to be considered are Mozart's The Magic Flute (Ingmar Bergman), Mozart's Don Giovanni (Joseph Losey), Verdi's La Traviata (Franco Zefferelli), Bizet's Carmen (Francesco Rosi), and Brecht/Weill Three Penny Opera (G. W. Pabst).

Reading Course

29700
Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
Staff

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Reading Course

29700
Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
Staff

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

B.A. Essay

29900
Consent of instructor
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
Staff

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. May not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

B.A. Essay

29900
Consent of instructor
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
Staff

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. May not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Perspectives on Imaging

27300
37300
ArtH 257/357
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
B. Stafford

This course focuses on the evolution and history of the production and dissemination of knowledge by visual means. Topics include evaluation of light perception and vision; emergence of drawing, writing, and printing; early optical instruments to extend vision; photographic recording of images; X-rays and computer-based, non-optical imaging methods; conceptual foundations of imaging science; visual knowledge, education, and multi-media learning; and the cultural impact of imaging in the twenty-first century.

Perspectives on Imaging

27300
37300
ArtH 257/357
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
B. Stafford

This course focuses on the evolution and history of the production and dissemination of knowledge by visual means. Topics include evaluation of light perception and vision; emergence of drawing, writing, and printing; early optical instruments to extend vision; photographic recording of images; X-rays and computer-based, non-optical imaging methods; conceptual foundations of imaging science; visual knowledge, education, and multi-media learning; and the cultural impact of imaging in the twenty-first century.

Beginning Photography

27600
37600
COVA 240
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Beginning Photography

27600
37600
COVA 240
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Seminar: Film and Melodrama

64100
ArtH, ENGL 588
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
T. Gunning

This seminar will discuss the ambiguous and protean inheritance that film as a popular form received from 19th century stage melodrama. The stage tradition of melodrama, both in terms of play texts, and performance and staging practices, will be surveyed with readings of 19th century melodramas and descriptions of their staging. Peter Brooks' discussion of "The Melodramatic Imagination" will be crucial to the course, both as an account of the 19th century tradition and as a claim for melodrama as a form that moves across genres. The claim by scholars that 19th century melodramatic stage had inherent ties to cinema as posed by Vardac and critiqued by the recent work of Brewster and Jacobs will also be considered. Melodrama as a form in silent cinema, and as a genre of sound cinema, including its particular relation to the women's film will also be considered, with writings by Mulvey, Doane and others. Films will be screened by Griffith, Feuillade, Sjostrom, Hitchcock, Vidor, Ophuls and Sirk.

Seminar: Film and Melodrama

64100
ArtH, ENGL 588
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 1999-2000
T. Gunning

This seminar will discuss the ambiguous and protean inheritance that film as a popular form received from 19th century stage melodrama. The stage tradition of melodrama, both in terms of play texts, and performance and staging practices, will be surveyed with readings of 19th century melodramas and descriptions of their staging. Peter Brooks' discussion of "The Melodramatic Imagination" will be crucial to the course, both as an account of the 19th century tradition and as a claim for melodrama as a form that moves across genres. The claim by scholars that 19th century melodramatic stage had inherent ties to cinema as posed by Vardac and critiqued by the recent work of Brewster and Jacobs will also be considered. Melodrama as a form in silent cinema, and as a genre of sound cinema, including its particular relation to the women's film will also be considered, with writings by Mulvey, Doane and others. Films will be screened by Griffith, Feuillade, Sjostrom, Hitchcock, Vidor, Ophuls and Sirk.

Cinema in Africa

24200
AFAFAM 219, ENGL 276
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
L. Kruger

African Civ and/or Intro to Film I This course places cinema in SubSaharan Africa in its social, cultural, and aesthetic contexts ranging from neocolonial to postcolonial, Western to Southern Africa, documentary to fiction, art cinema to TV. Depending on availability, films will include African film-makers with international reputations such as Ousmane Sembene, Djibril Diop Mambety, Flora Gomez, Idrissa Ouedraogou, Lionel Rogosin, neocolonial adventure pics like Zulu (Enfield), ethnographic film, both metropolitan (Rouch's Maitres Fous) and local (Bringing Back the Goddess, about the revival of a Zulu tradition), and narratives of anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa and anticolonial struggle elsewhere.

Cinema in Africa

24200
AFAFAM 219, ENGL 276
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
L. Kruger

African Civ and/or Intro to Film I This course places cinema in SubSaharan Africa in its social, cultural, and aesthetic contexts ranging from neocolonial to postcolonial, Western to Southern Africa, documentary to fiction, art cinema to TV. Depending on availability, films will include African film-makers with international reputations such as Ousmane Sembene, Djibril Diop Mambety, Flora Gomez, Idrissa Ouedraogou, Lionel Rogosin, neocolonial adventure pics like Zulu (Enfield), ethnographic film, both metropolitan (Rouch's Maitres Fous) and local (Bringing Back the Goddess, about the revival of a Zulu tradition), and narratives of anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa and anticolonial struggle elsewhere.

Sound in the Cinema

28000
ENGL 282, GSHum 205
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
J. Lastra

This course will develop our abilities to discuss, analyze, and research sound recording, audio media, and aspects of auditorship in theoretical and historical terms. Beginning with basic terminology and concepts specific to sound forms, we will investigate specific historical and theoretical topics including the emergence of recorded sound in the 1870s-1890s, the coming of sound to the American and international cinemas in the 1920s-1930s, and theoretical investigations of acoustic technologies and of listening. Throughout, we will remain attentive to the specificity of audio and audio-visual forms, but open to inter-media debates, concepts, and issues. We will pay particular attention to innovative works in audio-visual media that have shaped the boundaries of aesthetic and theoretical exploration. Readings will include essays by Edison, Benjamin, Adorno, Eisenstein, Prokofiev, Frith, and Altman. Films and videos will include works by Vertov, Eisenstein, Disney, Kubelka, Lang, Coppola, and Cage/Cunningham.

Sound in the Cinema

28000
ENGL 282, GSHum 205
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
J. Lastra

This course will develop our abilities to discuss, analyze, and research sound recording, audio media, and aspects of auditorship in theoretical and historical terms. Beginning with basic terminology and concepts specific to sound forms, we will investigate specific historical and theoretical topics including the emergence of recorded sound in the 1870s-1890s, the coming of sound to the American and international cinemas in the 1920s-1930s, and theoretical investigations of acoustic technologies and of listening. Throughout, we will remain attentive to the specificity of audio and audio-visual forms, but open to inter-media debates, concepts, and issues. We will pay particular attention to innovative works in audio-visual media that have shaped the boundaries of aesthetic and theoretical exploration. Readings will include essays by Edison, Benjamin, Adorno, Eisenstein, Prokofiev, Frith, and Altman. Films and videos will include works by Vertov, Eisenstein, Disney, Kubelka, Lang, Coppola, and Cage/Cunningham.

Reading Course

29700
Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
Staff

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Reading Course

29700
Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
Staff

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

B.A. Essay

29900
Consent of instructor
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
Staff

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. May not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

B.A. Essay

29900
Consent of instructor
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
Staff

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. May not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Mastroianni and Keitel: Comparative Masculinities and Ethnicities

23600
33600
Ital 285/385, GenSt 285/385
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
R. West

Using films in which Marcello Mastroianni and Harvey Keitel star, we shall study the diverse concepts of masculinity and ethnicity that these actors embody. We will employ theoretical approaches to filmic representations of maleness and ethnic "types," to cultural assumptions and stereotypes regarding men, and to Italian and American styles of filmmaking in the analysis of such films as La Dolce Vita, Otto e Mezzo, Una Giornata Particolare, La Città Delle Donne, Stanno Tutti Bene, and Mean Streets, The Duelists, Two Evil Eyes, Reservoir Dogs, Bad Lieutenant, and The Piano. Particular attention will be given to Mastroianni's close collaboration with Fellini, and to Keitel's penchant for working with debut directional projects (Scorsese, Tarantino, Ridley Scott) and with independent directors (Jane Campion, Spike Lee, Abel Ferrara). All work in English, although Italian Ph.D. students and majors will be expected, in addition to writing a final research paper in English, to read some critical materials and to write a short book review in Italian.

Film in India

24100
34100
Anth 206/31, Hist 267/367, SALC 205/305
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
R. Inden

Considers the film world from just before Independence (1947) down to the present. Most attention will be paid to the Hindi film, especially to its "peculiar" features, for example, the song and dance. Emphasis is placed on reconstruction of film-related activities that can be taken as life practices from the standpoint of "elites" and "masses," "middle classes," men and women, people in cities and villages, governmental institutions, businesses, and the "nation." The course will rely on people's notions of the everyday, festive days, paradise, arcadia and utopia to pose questions about how people try to realize their wishes and themselves through film. How film practices articulated with colonialism, nationalism, "socialist development," and, now, "free markets" will be a major concern. Students will be asked to familiarize themselves with existing approaches to Indian film against the background of more general approaches to film and the media. Some knowledge of Hindi desirable but not required (most films will be subtitled in English and have English synopses).

Theories of Photographic Image and Film

27500
37500
ArtH 272/372, COVA 255, GSHum 233/333
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
J. Snyder

This course is an introduction and survey of theories concerning photography and cinema. A variety of works by the following authors, among others, is discussed: Stanley Cavell, Erwin Panofsky, Siegfried Kracauer, André Bazin, Christian Metz, Susan Sontag, Edward Weston, Ernst Gombrich, Nelson Goodman, and John Szarkowski.

Beginning Photography

27600
37600
COVA 240
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

The Ends of American Photography

47000
ArtH 472, ENGL 495
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
J. Snyder and W.J.T. Mitchell

History of International Cinema, Part I, Silent Era

28500
48500
ArtH 285/385, ENGL 293/487, MAPH 336
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 1999-2000
Y. Tsivian

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

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