Courses

Animals and Cinema: From Horror to Wildlife Documentary

21800
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
I. Pollman

From the first films on, animals have been a constant presence on the screen, whether in safari films, popular science films, avant-garde films, horror and sci-fi films, anthropomorphizing narrative films with animal stars, or wildlife documentaries. What is this fascination of the cinema with animals? How do our encounters with animals in the movie theater differ from encounters in zoos, at home, or in the wild? What happens to animals when they are technologically mediated, and what happens to (human) spectators in the film experience of wild, cute, strange, or horrifying creatures? In this course, we will examine films including Electrocution of an Elephant (1903), Starewicz’s insect stop motion animations, American creature features such as Tarantula, as well as Tourneur’s Cat People, Bresson’s Au Hasard Balthazar, Herzog’s Grizzly Man, and others. With the help of these films, we will investigate relationships among humans, animals and technology in modernity, as well as concepts of animation, life, and wildlife. This course will familiarize students with the philosophical background of the “question” of the animal and engage film criticism that focuses on the ways in which film communicates, mediates, and transforms creaturely life. The course will incorporate readings by André Bazin, Jacques Derrida, Giorgio Agamben, J.M. Coetzee, Donna Haraway, Akira Lippit, Mary Ann Doane, Gilles Deleuze, Dudley Andrew, and others. 

Pickford and the American Film Industry

21901
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
E. Binggeli

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

Senior Colloquium

29800
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
J. Lastra

CMST 10100. Required of all Cinema and Media Studies concentrators. This seminar is designed to provide senior concentrators with a sense of the variety of methods and approaches in the field (such as formal analysis, cultural history, industrial history, reception studies, psychoanalysis). Students will present material relating to their B.A. project, which will be discussed in relation to the issues of the course.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

American Cinema Since 1960

31900
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
M. Hansen

The year 1960 is commonly understood as a watershed in United States film history, marking the end of the so-called "classical" Hollywood cinema. We will discuss this assumption in terms of the break-up of the studio system; the erosion of the Production Code; the crisis of audience precipitated by television's mass spread; and the changing modes of film reception, production, and style under the impact of video, cable, and other electronic communication technologies. We will also relate cinema to social and political issues of the post-1960s period (Civil Rights, student and women's movements, the Vietnam war, urban crisis, reproductive freedom, AIDS, the Reagan/Bush era, and the end of the Cold War) and ask how films reflected upon and intervened in contested areas of public and private experience. With the help of the concept of "genre" (and the changed "genericity" of 1980s and '90s films) and of the notion of "national cinema" (usually applied to film traditions other than the United States), we will attempt a dialogue between industrial/stylistic and cultural-studies approaches to film history.

Neorealism: Space, Culture, History

23000
33000
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
N. Steimatsky

Following the traumatic devastations of Fascism, the physical and moral collapse of World War II, filmmakers such as Rossellini, Visconti, and De Sica (to cite only the most famous) offered the most immediate and influential responses to reconstruction of postwar Europe.  Neorealism thus became a model for the renewal of cinemas everywhere, binding a new ethic and aesthetic of filmmaking in ways that remain exemplary for other nations and minorities to this day.  In its renewed exploration of space and location, temporality and history, neorealism was also a central reference for artists, architects, and writers.  This course will interlace key neorealist feature films with lesser known works, including documentaries and shorts, offering fresh perspectives on one of the most influential movements in film history.  All readings in English.

From La Dolce Vita to the Murder of Pasolini

23001
33001
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
N. Steimatsky

Following the traumatic devastations of Fascism, the physical and moral collapse of World War II, filmmakers such as Rossellini, Visconti, and De Sica (to cite only the most famous) offered the most immediate and influential responses to reconstruction of postwar Europe.  Neorealism thus became a model for the renewal of cinemas everywhere, binding a new ethic and aesthetic of filmmaking in ways that remain exemplary for other nations and minorities to this day.  In its renewed exploration of space and location, temporality and history, neorealism was also a central reference for artists, architects, and writers.  This course will interlace key neorealist feature films with lesser known works, including documentaries and shorts, offering fresh perspectives on one of the most influential movements in film history.  All readings in English.

Introduction to Film Production

28920
38920
ARTV 23850/33850, HMRT 25102/35102
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
J. Hoffman

This intensive laboratory will be an introduction to 16mm film production, experimenting with various film stocks and basic lighting designs. The class will be organized around a series of production situations and students will work in crews. Each crew will learn to operate and maintain the 16mm Bolex film camera, tripod; Arri lights, gels, diffusion, and grip equipment. The final project will be an in camera edit. No prerequisites. Lab fee $100.

Methods and Issues in Cinema Studies

40000
ENGL 48000, MAPH 33000
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
T. Gunning

This course offers an introduction to ways of reading, writing on, and teaching film. The focus of discussion will range from methods of close analysis and basic concepts of film form, technique and style; through industrial/critical categories of genre and authorship (studios, stars, directors); through aspects of the cinema as a social institution, psycho-sexual apparatus and cultural practice; to the relationship between filmic texts and the historical horizon of production and reception. Films discussed will include works by Griffith, Lang, Hitchcock, Deren, Godard.

Perception and Understanding of Multimedia

41500
CDIN 51500, MUSI 45010, PSYC 41501
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
B. Hoeckner

In light of the proliferation of film, television, and recently the internet, this course investigates the perception and understanding of multimedia and their effect on cultural production and social relations.  The course offers an introduction to empirical research on multimedia in social and cognitive psychology and neuroscience, which will be considered in conjunction with critical issues of multimedia research in the humanities. Participants will conduct an actual empirical study, preferably as a collaboration between participants from the humanities and the social sciences.  Topics may include the role of attention, memory, emotion, and value judgment in multimedia and their relation to complex manifestations of social behavior, such as artistic production, advertisement, and journalism. A recurring theme of the course will be the relationship between sound and image.  To enable empirical research, ten seminar sessions will be spread out over the entire academic year, with five introductory sessions in the fall quarter, three sessions devoted to the preparation of pilot studies in the winter quarter, and two final sessions discussing results of the actual experiments in the spring quarter.  Participants should come away from the course with the understanding and experience that it is possible and productive to combine critical methods in the humanities with the empirical approaches in the natural and social sciences.

Styles of Performance and Expression from Stage to Screen

48402
CMLT 40900, SLAV 48402
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
Y. Tsivian

This seminar will focus on the history of acting styles in silent film (1895-1930) mapping "national" styles of acting that emerged during the 1910s (American, Danish, Italian, Russian) and various "acting schools" that proliferated during the 1920s ("Expressionist acting," "Kuleshov's workshop," etc). We will discuss film acting in the context of stage acting: its history from the 17th to 20th century, its theories and systems (Delsarte, Stanislavsky, Meyerhold) and in the context of fine arts. We will also look at various theories of impact (empathy, identification, etc) and at some influential texts in the history of performance (Diderot, Coquelin, Kleist).

History of International Cinema, Part I, Silent Era

28500
48500
ARTH 28500/38500, CMLT 22400/32400, COVA 26500, ENGL 29300/48700, MAPH 33600
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
J. Lastra

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Race, Media, and Visual Culture

51300
CDIN 51300, ARTH 49309, ENGL 51300
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
D. English, W.J.T. Mitchell

This seminar will explore the question of race, racism, and racial identity across a variety of media and social practices, including photography and cinema, visual art and literature, and the iconology of everyday life.  The seminar will provide a twin introduction to the fundamentals of visual cultural theory and media studies, on the one hand, and racial theory on the “other.” The study of racial theory will converge with issues of visuality, mediation, and iconology, particularly the question of stereotype and caricature, the role of fantasy and the imaginary in racist perception, and its reproduction and critique in various form of visual art and media. Sponsored by the Center for Disciplinary Innovation (CDI), the seminar will combine methodologies from art history, literary criticism, visual and media studies, as well as anthropology.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
Staff

Consent of instructor. Please register by faculty section.

Introduction to Film I

10100
ARTH 20000, ARTV 25300, ENGL 10800, ISHU 20000
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
Staff

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres.  Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception.  Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles. 

The Western

25510
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
M. Hauske

The western was the most dominant genre in Hollywood cinema from the 1910s to the 1960s, constituting as much as one quarter of all production during that time. For this reason the western has played a deep and important role in the development not only of action films but of Hollywood production in general, including even the relocation of American film production from the East Coast to the West Coast. In addition the western has been viewed by critics, scholars, and filmmakers as having a privileged position in regard to reflecting and registering the American condition and the condition of the American state, commenting on both domestic issues including McCarthyism and racism as well as US foreign policy and its role in the world from at least World War II through the Cold War and beyond. This course will provide a survey of the sound western from the 1930s to the 1970s, examining its changing place in Hollywood and America. The western genre will be examined as both a set stylistic and structural choices or possibilities as well as a group of texts with a special, often allegorical, often problematic, relationship with American current events. Films to be studied include Stagecoach, My Darling Clementine, Red River, High Noon, Rio Bravo, The Wild Bunch, High Plains Drifter, and Blazing Saddles.

Cinema and the City

27201
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
N. Holmes

This course traces out the relations between film style and aesthetics and the experiences and visuality particular to modern city life. Focus will be paid to how films have imagined cities and created narratives around them as well as to ideas about the particularly visual nature of urban space and circulation. Lectures and screenings will cover film cycles and genres from the city symphony and film noir, to Skateboard videos and The Wire, as well as particular directors—Alfred Hitchcock, Jean Pierre Melville, Fritz Lang, Michael Mann, among others—whose body of work indicates an ongoing concern with metropolitan themes and ideas. Though concentrating primarily on North American and European films, South American and Asian cinemas will also be considered, as will be the shifting viewing contexts within which films are watched. Course readings will center primarily on experiences of urban modernity, film form, and film history, but will also cover urbanism and urban history, urban sociology, and architecture.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Women Mystery Writers: From Page to Screen

20101
30101
GNDR 20202
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
R. West

Many distinguished filmmakers have found inspiration in mystery novels written by women. In this course we shall read novels by Patricia Highsmith (Strangers on a Train, The Talented Mr. Ripley, Ripley's Game), Ruth Rendell (Tree of Hands, The Bridesmaid, Live Flesh), and, time permitting, Laura by Vera Caspary, Bunny Lake is Missing by Evelyn Piper, and  Mischief by Charlotte Armstrong, and we shall analyze the films based on these novels, directed by such luminaries as Hitchcock. Chabrol, Caviani, Clément, Wenders, Almodóvar, Preminger, and others. Among topics of particular interest are: techniques of film adaptation; transnational dislocations from page to screen; the problematics of gender; and the transformations of "voice" understood both literally and mediatically.

Creative Thesis Seminar

23903
33903
ARTV 23904/33904
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
J. Hoffman

This seminar will focus on how to craft a creative thesis in film or video. Works-in-progress will be screened each week, and technical and structural issues relating to the work will be explored. The seminar will also develop the written portion of the creative thesis. The class is limited to seniors from CMS and DOVA, and MAPH students working on a creative thesis.

Japanese New Wave Cinema

24907
34907
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
M. Raine

This course surveys the rise and fall of alternatives to studio cinema in Japan between the 1950s and the 1970s. The concept of a "new wave" is notoriously imprecise: rather than shared stylistic attributes or political programs, the films are best understood as linked in a loose "culture of authenticity" that opposed the jokey emulation of foreign forms in the studio cinema's "culture of the copy." Topics include the Nikkatsu and Shochiku new waves, union-based oppositional cinema, experimental film-making, radical documentary, Cahier's style auteurs, the Shochiku new wave, experimental theatre, the Shinjuku and Shibuya film-theatre subcultures, and the institutional roles of the Sogetsu Art Center and the Art Theatre Guild.  No knowledge of Japanese is required: separate section for discussion of Japanese sources.

Theories of Media

27800
37800
ARTH 25900/35900, ARTV 25400, ENGL 12800/32800, ISHU 21800, MAPH 32800
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
W.J.T. Mitchell

Any 10000-level ARTH or ARTV course, or consent of instructor.  This course explores the concept of media and mediation in very broad terms, looking not only at modern technical media and mass media but also at the very idea of a medium as a means of communication, a set of institutional practices and a habitat in which images proliferate and take on a “life of their own.”  Readings include classic texts (e.g., Plato’s Allegory of the Cave and Cratylus, Aristotle’s Poetics); and modern texts (e.g., Marshall McLuhan’s Understanding Media, Regis Debray’s Mediology, Friedrich Kittler’s Gramaphone, Film, Typewriter). 

Documentary Video

28000
38000
ARTV 23901/33901
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
J. Hoffman

This course focuses on the making of independent documentary video. Examples of direct cinema, cinéma vérité, the essay, ethnographic film, the diary and self-reflexive cinema, historical and biographical film, agitprop/activist forms, and guerilla television are screened and discussed. Topics include the ethics and politics of representation and the shifting lines between fact and fiction. Labs explore video pre-production, camera, sound, and editing. Students develop an idea for a documentary video; form crews; and produce, edit, and screen a five-minute documentary. A two-hour lab is required in addition to class time. Lab fee $50.

The Face on Film

43002
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
N. Steimatsky

The seminar will discuss on the workings of the face –as imprint of identity, as figure of subjectivity, as privileged object of representation, as mode and ethic of address – through film theory and practice.  How has cinema responded to the mythic and iconic charge of the face, to the portrait’s exploration of model and likeness, identity and identification, the revelatory and masking play of expression, the symbolic and social registers informing the human countenance.  At this intersection of archaic desires and contemporary anxieties, the face will serve as our medium by which to reconsider, in the cinematic arena, some of the oldest questions on the image.  Among the filmmakers and writers who will inform our discussion are Balázs, Epstein, Kuleshov, Dreyer, Pasolini, Hitchcock, Warhol, Bresson, Bazin, Barthes, Doane, Aumont, Nancy, Didi-Huberman, and others.

Decolonizing South African Lit and Film

44507
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
L. Kruger

While ‘postcolonialism’ turns a complex and contradictory history into a tidy theory, decolonizing highlights the uneven and unfinished process of transforming the literary and cultural production of Southern Africa into production of and for that region of the world. This graduate course will track writing and filming from the national narratives of the 1950s and 1960s to the possibly post national present. We will explore both links and differences between the literary and cinematic cultures of several countries, especially South Africa, Zimbabwe and Angola, and examine the potential and pitfalls of applying postcolonial and other effectively metropolitan theories to this region. Authors may include Nadine Gordimer, Athol Fugard, Doris Lessing, Zakes Mda, Zoe Wicomb, Bessie Head, Luandino Vieira, and others; film-makers: Lionel Rogosin, Sarah Maldoror, Zola Maseko, Tsitsi Dangerembga and others; theoretical texts by anti colonial writers Fanon, Mandela, Neto and/or Cabral, and contemporary analysis by Anne McClintock,Achille Mbembe, Njabulo Ndebele and others Note: all required texts in English but readings in Portuguese included. Afrikaans, Zulu can be arranged

Seminar: Catharsis and other Aesthetic Responses

50200
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
L. Kruger

This PhD seminar examines the ramifications of catharsis and other responses to texts and images, in other words it  investigates the relationship between effect and affect. Beginning with Aristotle and present day responses to catharsis, we will investigate the kinds of aesthetic response invoked by tragic drama and theory (esp Hegel), realism (Lukacs, Bazin and Brecht), as well as theories of pleasure (Barthes, Derrida), judgment (Kant, Bourdieu) and boredom (Spacks). We will conclude with a test case, exploring the potential and limitations of catharsis as an appropriate response to the literary and cinematic representation of trauma in and after the Argentine ‘dirty war.’ An essential part of the discussion will be the problem of translating key terms, not only from one language to another but also from one theoretical discourse and/or medium to another. This seminar is the second required core course for ComLit PhDs. PQ for other humanities PhDs: ACTIVE working knowledge of at least one of the following: French, German, (classical) Greek or Spanish.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
Staff

Consent of instructor. Please register by faculty section.

Cinema Post-Cinema

68702
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
M.Hansen

As the emergence of new media has been dislodging cinema from the central position it held in public culture throughout most of the twentieth century, and as digital technologies play an ever greater role in the production and dissemination of films, some critics are referring to the present era as “post-cinematic.” Likewise, in celebrations of a new “convergence culture,” cinema is said to be disappearing into a larger stream of audiovisual media. In this seminar, we will discuss such claims by tracing some of the developments and changes that would support them, along with the rhetoric that mounts them. At the same time, we will ask whether there are salient features that continue to distinguish cinema as a sensory-perceptual regime and aesthetic dispositif, associated with particular forms of experience and publicness, even as the above developments have significantly destabilized the institution and not least have affected the way we approach film history. Finally, we will look at examples of hybrid forms of moving-image practice that have evolved in contemporary art as well as new film cultures all over the world (e.g. China, Nigeria), in the context of political and social movements and alternative modes of distribution and venues. Readings include texts by Shaviro, Jenkins, Manovich, Rodowick, Doane, Rosen, Gunning, Mulvey, Sobchack, Kinder, Galloway, Chun, Kirschenbaum, Bellour, Larkin, and Zhang Zhen. MA students by permission of instructor only

Introduction to Film I

10100
ARTH 20000, ARTV 25300, ENGL 10800, ISHU 20000
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2009-2010
Staff

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres.  Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception.  Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles. 

American Film Melodrama and the Gothic

21101
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2009-2010
C. Petersen

American film melodrama has been considered both the genre of suffering protagonists, incredible coincidences, and weeping spectators as well as a mode of action, suspense, and in-the-nick-of-time escapes. In this course, we will examine American film melodrama in terms of a dialectic of sentiment and sensation that draws heavily on Gothic tropes of terror, live burial, and haunted internal states. We will trace the origins of film melodrama and the cinematic Gothic to their literary antecedents, the horrors of the French Revolution, and classical and sensational stage melodramas of the nineteenth century. In addition to the 1940s Gothic woman’s film cycle, we will excavate the Gothic in the maternal melodrama of the 1930s, the suspense thriller, noir detective film, domestic melodrama, the birth of the slasher film, and the supernatural horror film of the 1970s. Literary sources will include works by Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Charlotte Brontë, Jane Austen, Oscar Wilde, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Edgar Allan Poe. Directors considered will include D.W. Griffith, King Vidor, Otto Preminger, Douglas Sirk, William Friedkin, Tim Burton, and our major example, Alfred Hitchcock.

Cinema and Politics in China

24610
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2009-2010
A.D. Xiang

In this course we will consider the intimate if often reluctant involvement of cinema with politics in three periods of modern Chinese history. We will start with the attempts by the Communist Party and Nationalist state alike to use the nascent Chinese cinema for ideological indoctrination in the 1930s, continue with the increasingly total ideological and aesthetic control of cinema during the Socialist era from 1949 onward and end with the critique of that totalitarianism and explorations of previously-proscribed techniques and subjectivities in the post-Socialist cinema of the 1980s. The "big question" we will explore is the interweaving of politics and aesthetics. A distinctive feature of Chinese cinema is that it has seen heavy intervention by political and intellectual elites. Some wanted to use cinema for mass education or indoctrination. Others were against such uses--but for what reasons? We will also read some of the latest scholarship on Chinese cinema that departs from this top-down paradigm and attempts a less elitest look at Chinese cinema and mass media. Key terms include "social realism," "socialist realism," "melodrama" and "vernacular modernism."

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2009-2010
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2009-2010
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Chicago Film History

21801
31801
ARTV 26750/36750
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2009-2010
J. Hoffman

This course will screen and discuss films to consider whether there is a Chicago style of filmmaking. We will trace how the city informs documentary, educational, industrial, narrative feature, and avant-garde films. If there is a Chicago style of filmmaking, one must look at the landscape of the city, the design, politics, cultures, and labor of its people, and how they live their lives. The protagonists and villains in these films are the politicians and community organizers, our locations are the neighborhoods, and the set designers are Mies van der Rohe and the Chicago Housing Authority.

Independent Catalan Cinema and Contemporary Culture

23900
33900
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2009-2010
V. Benet

Independent film plays a major role in contemporary Catalan culture. As the Franco regime came to an end and an incipient democracy began to take hold, Barcelona gradually became a cosmopolitan, cultural center with a clear penchant for European tendencies. Its burgeoning publishing industry provided fertile ground for new forms of art, design, advertising, architecture, comics, etc. New collaborations sprung up among filmmakers, architects, and multidisciplinary artists, who opened the way toward new aesthetics.Independent filmmakers consciously veered away from the stylistic and narrative formulas of the mainstream film industry. In their search for new, genuine forms of expression, they kept a keen eye on what was going on in contemporary literature, music and art. This general outloook reached a highpoint in the late sixties with the "Escuela de Barcelona" films. With filmmakers such as Pere Portabella, Joaquim Jordà or Jacinto Esteva a new film form crystallized which would continue in later independent, avant-garde and underground films during the 70s and 80s.We can trace these experimental aesthetics down to even more recent independent Catalan filmmakers such as José Luis Guerín, Marc Recha or Albert Serra. Thus, the purpose of this course is to illuminate how independent Catalan film developed in relationship to literary and artistic works of their day, as well as to the social context in which they were created.

Latin American Cinema

23904
33904
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2009-2010
S. Skvirsky

This course is a survey of Latin American cinema with a critical focus on the debates surrounding national and transnational film. The first third of the course will examine the critiques and defenses of national cinema, attending in particular to the distinct concerns of postcolonial polities. In Latin America, these concerns have included cultural imperialism arising from neocolonial economic relations, the incorporation of non-white majorities into foundational myths of national origin, and the construction of cohesive national histories and traditions. The second third of the course will consider the differences between national cinema before and after the advent of the New Latin American Cinema in the 1960s. With the emergence of a New Latin American Cinema and the associated theory and criticism of the 1960s, national cinema was tied to an anti-imperialist, anti-capitalist politics. Aesthetic modernism, left political radicalism, and the new attempt to make a properly national cinema were joined in a single continental cinema project. But with the waning of left politics in the region and the intellectual challenges to the core-periphery schemas associated with the dependency school, new questions have arisen about the validity of that project. The last third of the course will explore recent debates about globalization, transnationalism, and post-nationalism—reflected in the critical discussion of films like City of God and Y tu mamá también—and how they are revising the terms of the 1960s controversies, for better and for worse. Films will include Memorias del subdesarrollo, La hora de los hornos, El Coraje del pueblo, Ganga Bruta, Araya, Sin dejar huella, La cienaga.

Agitation and Propaganda

24905
34905
EALC 24905/34904
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2009-2010
M. Raine

This class traces the deployment of cinema as both national culture and “optical weapon” during a time of total war. We will study the Film Law of 1939 and the "national policy films" and "people's films" that attempted to raise the aesthetic and technical level of cinema in Japan in order to compete with the memory of Hollywood films both at "home" and in the Asian countries occupied by Japan. The class will include films made under Japanese sponsorship in the colonies of Taiwan and Korea as well as in the puppet state of Manchuria and the occupied territory of Shanghai. We will also study local sources of wartime Japanese cinema -- the prewar leftist film movement, the documentary film movement, the narrative avant-garde -- in the context of the broader image culture of wartime Japan. No knowledge of Japanese is required: separate section for discussion of Japanese and other Asian sources.

Cinema in Wartime Japan and its Territories

34906
EALC 44905
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2009-2010
M. Raine

This seminar explores the history of cinema as a new medium for "propaganda and agitation" in the context of Japan's wars in Asia and the Pacific, 1937-1945. We will study Japanese films as part of a global 1930s "illiberal modernism" while simultaneously exploring more local sources of wartime cinema, in the prewar leftist film movement, the documentary film movement, the narrative avant-garde, and the broader image culture of wartime Japan. We will also explore how the medium was deployed in Japan's colonies (Taiwan and Korea), client states (Manchuria), and occupied territories (Eastern China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, the Philippines, etc).  English will be the lingua-franca for the course but there will also be opportunities to read primary and secondary Japanese documents, and materialin other languages.  No Asian language requirement, but there will be Japanese and other non-English readings for students with appropriate language skills.

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