Courses

Digital Imaging

28800
COVA 22500
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
A. Ruttan

COVA 10100 or 10200, or consent of instructor. Using the Macintosh platform this course serves as an introduction to the use of digital technology as a means of making visual art. Instruction will cover Photo Shop's graphics program as well as digital imaging hardware (scanners, storage, and printing). In addition we will be addressing problems of color, design, collage, and drawing. Topics of discussion may include questions regarding the mediated image and its relationship to art as well as examining what constitutes the "real" in contemporary culture.

Video I: Short Experiments

28900
COVA 23800
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
H. Mirra

COVA 10100 or 10200, or consent of instructor. An introduction to video making, with digital cameras and non-linear (digital) editing. Students will produce a group of short works, which will be contextualized by viewing and discussion of historical and contemporary video works. Video versus film, editing strategies and appropriation are some of the subjects that will be part of an ongoing conversation.

Senior Colloquium

28900
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
J. Lastra

CMS 101. Required of all Cinema and Media Studies concentrators. This seminar is designed to provide senior concentrators with a sense of the variety of methods and approaches in the field (such as formal analysis, cultural history, industrial history, reception studies, psychoanalysis). Students will present material relating to their B.A. project, which will be discussed in relation to the issues of the course.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
Staff

Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Queer Representation in Film before Stonewall

20900
30900
GNDR 22700/32700
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
R. Gregg

This course examines the representation of queer sexuality and culture in classical Hollywood films from silent film to 1970. The course will pay particular attention to the changing modes of Hollywood production, the impact of censorship before, during and after the Hays Code, the shifting codes used to connote queerness (even when it was prohibited) and the ways different audiences read these codes. We will analyze these representational shifts in relationship to broader changes in the understanding of gender and same-sex desire. Finally, Hollywood films will be compared to experimental film and early German cinema.

Film in India

24100
34100
ANTH 20600/31100, HIST 26700/36700, SALC 20500/30500
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
R. Inden

Considers the film world from 1975 to the present. Most attention will be paid to the Hindi film and especially to its "peculiar" features, for example, the song and dance. Emphasis is placed on the reconstruction of film-related activities which can be taken as life practices from the stand point of "elites" and "masses," "middle classes," men and women, people in cities and villages, governmental institutions, businesses, and the "nation." The course will rely on people's notions of the everyday, festive days, paradise, arcadia and utopia to pose questions about how people try to realize their wishes and themselves through film. How film practices articulated with nationalism, first in the wake of a failing "socialist pattern of development," and, then, with "liberalization," of the promise or threat "free markets" would bring, will be the major concern. A brief look will also be taken at how film is related to other media such as television. Some comparisons with Hollywood will be made. Students will be asked to familiarize themselves with existing approaches to Indian film against the background of more general approaches to film and the media. Some knowledge of Hindi desirable but not required (films will be subtitled in English and have English synopses). One film per week will be shown. Requirement: One 10-page paper, written in two stages.

The Horriffic and Terrible: The Technological Body of Japanese Cinema

24600
34600
JAPN 22100, GNDR 22200
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
J. Hall

The course examines the cinematic and narrative presentation of gender, technology, and the body in popular Japanese cinema from 1923 to the present. While attention is naturally given to the political culture and popular motivations behind mid-century monster and horror films such as Godzilla or The Invisible Man and late-century anime/animation such as Neon Genesis Evangelion or Ghost in the Shell, the course pays equal attention to a study and theorization of machines and their humans in the context of heavy industry, wartime mobilization, and mass-produced consumer durables. Examination follows Marxist, feminist, and post-colonial perspectives.

Photo & Film: Theory/Practice

27500
37500
COVA 24000
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Methods and Issues in Cinema Studies

40000
ArtH 39900, ENGL 48000, MAPH 33000
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
M. Hansen

This course offers an introduction to ways of reading, writing on, and teaching film. The focus of discussion will range from methods of close analysis and basic concepts of film form, technique and style; through industrial/critical categories of genre and authorship (studios, stars, directors); through aspects of the cinema as a social institution, psycho-sexual apparatus and cultural practice; to the relationship between filmic texts and the historical horizon of production and reception. Films discussed will include works by Griffith, Lang, Hitchcock, Deren, Godard.

History of International Cinema, Part I, Silent Era

28500
48500
ArtH 28500/38500, ENGL 29300/48700, MAPH 33600
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
Y. Tsivian

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
Staff

Consent of instructor

Topics in Film Music

65100
MUSI 42000
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
B. Hoeckner

This course explores how music participates in the formation and workings of memory in film. While music has long been instrumental in preserving and communicating private and public memories, its ability to do so has been significantly broadened by reproduction technology in the 20th century. A prominent manifestation of what might be called the "memory track" of culture is the musical soundtrack in films, which functions as a passive repository of memories, or becomes an active agent of remembrance. Film music is key to notions of nostalgia and sentiment, as well as periodic commemoration and ritual. The goal of the seminar is twofold (1) Since the study of film music has played a marginal role in both musicology and film studies, we will draw on a selection of literature to acquaint ourselves with important issues in the relationship between music and image (this will include Adorno's and Eisler's Composing for the Films). (2) We will explore theoretical models and metaphorical traditions of memory and remembrance and investigate how they might contribute to the aesthetics of film music as well as advance our understanding of individual movies in which memory is thematic.ÊÊIn the first half of the quarter, we will study selected films ranging, for example, from "Once upon a time in the West" to "Dead Again," from "Radio Days" to "Night and Fog." Participants with a musical background will have the opportunity to reconstruct and analyze Eisler's score for Night and Fog, while those who have no reading knowledge of music will work on related projects tailored to their expertise. In the second half of the quarter, we will work on films selected by the participants.

Seminar: Vernacular Modernism Strikes Back

67400
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2002-2003
Y. Tsivian

This seminar is neither a sequel to nor a repeat of the class on vernacular modernism that Miriam Hansen offered last spring; rather, this young concept will be subjected to a few practical tasks. What does it add to film historian's toolkit? Does it let us probe deeper into the monolith of Hollywood film history? We will look at vernacular modernism as a working hypothesis that may help to account for the European impact of silent film in the US. Stable as it may appear, Hollywood style (or styles, if we do not take its unity too much for granted) is by no means a closed or immanent system; what truly provides for its homeostasis are things that change, not ones that remain in place. The dynamics between American and European styles of filmmaking must be viewed as give-and-take, not as Hollywood's conquest of world cinema. It is that less obvious angle - the reciprocity between Europe and Hollywood - that this seminar will be concerned with. We will look at the ways early American cinema responded to Melies-like trick-film aesthetics, or to Film-d'Art-like noble pictures; at its war for independence from Pathe Frères after 1908; how Griffith reacted to Italian innovations; what impact the success of German Expressionist cinema had in the United States; on Eisenstein and von Sternberg, Murnau and Borgese, or Murnau and Ford. In most of these cases, our goal will be to keep in sight both rounds of this ongoing interaction what the American success of Fritz Lang's German films changed in American film culture, but also what its German success owed to American impact on Lang.

Polish Cinema Since 1945

24400
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
E. Nazarian

The course is designed to be a survey of Polish cinema since 1945 up to the present. We will consider Polish cinema in the context of both a national and a European cinema. Films will be examined from both a historical and an aesthetic perspective in order to present the main trends in post-war Polish cinema, for example: Socialist Realism, the Polish Film School and the Cinema of Moral Concern. This will lead into a discussion of the works of some of the most important Polish filmmakers (Andrzej Wajda, Andrzej Munk, Roman Polanski, Agnieszka Holland, Krzysztof Kieslowski and others).

Video II: Narrative

28901
COVA 23900
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
H. Mirra

COVA 23800 One or two tapes will be produced by each student, which will be looked at closely along the way in class critiques. Screenings of work by Chris Marker, Walid Ra'ad, Leslie Thornton, Gregg Bordowitz, Igor Vamos, Alex Rivera and others. Discussions and readings will address experimental documentary, fact/fiction/fictionalization, continuity, autobiography, writing for video, and sound recording techniques.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

Religion and Modernity in Film

24300
34300
ANTH 21900/32400, HIST 26800/36800
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
R. Inden

Considers the problem of how popular films in the US, Europe, and Asia have represented the conventional religions' relation to modernity: the idea of film practices ("youth culture") as constituting a secular religion alternative or antagonistic to the conventional religions and the recuperation and transformation of conventional religiosity in modernist, especially patriotic and science-fiction films as a national theology ("civil religion"). One to two films per week will be shown. Requirement: One 10-page paper, written in two stages.

Soviet Art and Film Culture of the 1920s

24700
34701
SLAV 26700/36700, ARTH 28100/38100
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
Y. Tsivian

This course will consider Soviet "montage cinema" of the twenties in the context of coeval aesthetic projects in other arts. How did Eisenstein's theory and practice of "intellectual cinema" connect to Fernand Leger and Vladimir Tatlin? What did Meyerhold's "biomechanics" mean for film makers? Among other figures and issues, we will address Dziga Vertov and Constructivism, German Expressionism and Aleksandr Dovzhenko, Formalist poetics and FEKS directors. The course will be film-intensive (up to three hours of out-of-class viewings per week).

Japanese Film/National Cinema

24900
34900
JAPN 32200
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
J. Hall

The course surveys Japanese cinema across the twentieth-century while interrogating assumptions of identity incumbent to both auteurist and national film studies traditions. Issues examined include the influence of kabuki and modernism on early cinema, the Japanese studio system as rival and complement to Hollywood production, cinema in Japan's colonial expansion and wartime, postwar social criticism, mid-century filmmaking of experimentation and resistance, and the recent vitality of independent film. Careful attention is paid to the 1930s, 1950s-60s, and 1990s as well as to directors such as Ozu, Mizoguchi, Naruse, Kurosawa, Masumura, Kitano, and Aoyama. Graduate students with reading skills in Japanese are asked to complete supplemental readings.

The Films of Max Ophuls

26500
36500
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
M. Hansen

Max Ophüls has variously been discussed as master of the long take and mise-en-scene, of theatrical adaptation and self-conscious narration; as director of the "woman's film," of melodramatic pathos and irony; and as artist and analyst of erotic ö and cinematic -- obsession. Following the trajectory of his life and work from Germany through France, Italy, Hollywood, and back to Europe, we will consider Ophüls' films in terms of style and genre; the question of his gynocentric aesthetic and the feminist debate surrounding it; filmmaking and reception under the conditions of exile and industrial production. Films include Liebelei, La Signora di tutti, Letter from an Unknown Woman, Caught, The Reckless Moment, La Ronde, Madame de..., Le Plaisir, and Lola Montes. (M.A. students require permission of instructor.)

Photo & Film: Theory/Practice

27500
37500
COVA 24000
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
L. Letinsky

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Advanced Photography

27700
37700
COVA 27800
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
L. Letinsky

COVA 101 or 102, andCOVA 101 or 102, and 240 or 241, or consent of instructor. Throughout the quarter, students concentrate on a set of issues and ideas that expand upon their experience and knowledge, and that have particular relevance to them. All course work is directed towards the production of a cohesive body of either color or black-and-white photographs. An investigation of contemporary and historic photographic issues informs the students' photographic practice and includes visits to local exhibitions, critical readings, darkroom techniques, and class and individual critiques. Lab fee $40.

Theories of Media

27800
37800
ArtH 25800/35800, COVA 25400, ENGL 12600/32600
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
W.J.T. Mitchell

This course explores the fundamental questions in the interdisciplinary study of visual culture: What are the cultural (and by the same token, natural) components in the structure of visual experience? What is seeing? What is a spectator? What is the difference between visual and verbal representation? How do visual media exert power, elicit desire and pleasure, and construct the boundaries of subjective and social experience in the private and public spheres? How do questions of politics, gender, sexuality, and ethnicity inflect the construction of visual semiosis?

Philosophy and Visual Culture

29200
39200
ARTH 26900/36900, PHIL 31000
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
J. Snyder and J. Conant

History of International Cinema, Part II, Sound Era

28600
48600
ArtH 28600/38600, COVA 26500, Engl 29600/48900, MAPH 33700
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
Y. Tsivian

This is the second part of the international survey history of film covering the sound era up to 1960. It is strongly recommended that students take the first section first. The course will cover the period from the advent of sound (late 1920s) through the 1960s (the last decade of 'classical' film culture) regarded in conjunction with major trends in film theories of the time.

Neuronal Aesthetics

48800
ARTH 45500
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
B. Stafford

Recently seeing has become an even more amazing process. findings concrning the internal circuitry of the visual brain, insights into brain architecture, biology, psychology, new media, and computation suggest that the domain of aesthetics must be re-defined. tfhis seminar will explore how neurology, optical technology, and both old and new media do and might intersect to create a new area of study.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
Staff

Consent of instructor

Realism Socialism Modernism: The Politics of Social and Literary Form

67100
ENGL 59400, CMLT 40400, GRMN 43700
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2002-2003
L. Kruger

The theoretical influence of arguments in the 1920s and 1930s about the relative value of realism and modernism is well-known, but the entwinement of theory with contemporary fictions and political debates is less so. This intensive reading course will attempt to historicize theory by revaluating the work relatively familiar theorists such as Benjamin, Lenin, and esp. Lukacs in the light of their interlocutors, in fiction, film, and drama - Brecht, Gladkov, Gorki, Pudovkin, Eisenstein, Dovzhenko, Seghers, Sholokhov, Christa Wolf, Konrad Wolf, Frank Beyer and their counterparts in American, the Living Newspaper, Film and Photo League, writers for New Masses as well as in theory - Bloch, Eisler, Zhdanov, Kenneth Burke, Mike Gold, John Howard Lawson, among others. Essential texts are available in English but working knowledge of German (or Russian) and/or Marxist basics would be very helpful.

Hollywood in the 21st Century

21300
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
R. Gregg

This course examines how globalization and the emergence of new digital technologies have affected Hollywood's organization of production, distribution, and exhibition, as well as the aesthetics of film image, sound, and narration. The course also pays attention to the varying national and international modes of resistance to Hollywood's hegemony and how the industry has responded to these modern challenges.

Video III: Studio Techniques

28902
COVA 27500
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
H. Mirra

COVA 23800 A production course geared towards non-broadcast forms in video, including installation. We will be looking at relevant material, including recent work by Harrison & Wood, Fischli & Weiss, Martin Kersels, Jane & Louise Wilson, Halflifers, Douglas Gordon and others.Ê Discussions and readings will address rapidly changing technology, non-narrative strategies, and viable approaches to producing video art in a world already full of video images.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

New German Cinema

22900
32900
GRMN 24000/34800
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
D. Levin

Advanced standing Introduction to the poetics and politics of some of the major works of postwar German Cinema, including films by Wolfgang Staudte, Helma Sanders-Brahms, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Werner Herzog, Alexander Kluge, Wim Wenders, Michael Verhoeven, and Monika Treut. In English. All films with English subtitles.

The French Exception in Hollywood

23800
33800
FREN 22900/32900
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
Staff

From the the veterans of the 10s (Maurice Tourneur, Louis Gasnier) until the "visiting auteurs" of the 70s (Louis Malle), we will study the difficult integration of the French filmmakers in the United States. We will mostly focus on the period of Word War II, with the exile of some leading artists of the thirties (Ren_ Clair, Jean Renoir, Julien Duvivier, Max Ophuls), in order to analyse how these filmmakers follow an "European dream" within the limits of the American industry.

Photo & Film: Theory/Practice

27500
37500
COVA 24000
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
L. Brown

COVA 101, 102, or consent of instructor. A camera and light meter are required. Photography affords a relatively simple and accessible means for making pictures. Through demonstration, students are introduced to technical procedures and basic skills, and begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. Possibilities and limitations inherent in the medium are topics of classroom discussion. Class sessions and field trips to local exhibitions investigate the contemporary photograph in relation to its historical and social context. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Lab fee $40.

Early Video Art

38700
COVA 30100
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
H. Mirra

A survey of the first wave of video art in the U.S. We will be screening and discussing the first ten years of video produced by artists and activists, primarily on the east coast and in California, including Bruce Nauman, John Baldessari, Martha Rosler, Eleanor Antin and Top Value Television. Because of relatively inexpensive equipment and inherently synced sound, video democratized the production of moving images, allowing artists to challenge imagined limits of broadcast television and encultured gender representations. Much of the work we will be looking at in this new medium was made as an auxillary activity by artists already working in sculpture, conceptual art, and performance. We will analyze the work as it relates both to this art context and to the socio-political climate of the seventies.

Brechtian Representations: Theatre, Theory, Cinema

46200
ENGL 44500, CMLT 40500, GRMN 32900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
L. Kruger

This course will examine the contribution of Brecht, the most influential playwright of the twentieth century and its principal theatre theorist, to the practice and theory of theatre and cinema. We will pay particular attention to the relationships between theory and practice in Brecht's own work so as to clarify the use and significance of terms that are both concepts and techniques - epic theatre, Verfremdung, gest, historicizing, refunctioning the apparatus, and teh formation of the critical audience - and go on to consider the influence (and refunctioning) of Brechtian theory and practice in the more recent work of playwrights (Heiner MŸller, Peter Weiss,RW Fassbinder, Edward Bond, Athol Fugard, ...), film-makers (Jean-Luc Godard, Alexander Kluge, Fassbinder, Djibril Diop Mambety ...), and cultural theorists (Barthes, Adorno, ...)

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
Staff

Consent of instructor

Problematics in Asian Cinema: City & Speed in Asian Cinema

64400
JAPN 44800
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
J. Hall

Undergraduates may register only with consent of the instructor The course examines relations between the city, cinematic apparatus, and affects of modernity in Asian cinemas. Hyperbole, displacement, commodity, anonymity, loss, fetish, and speed are among the tropes of urban life that we examine within, and as a product of, Asian cinemas of the modern. Wartime Shanghai, imperial Tokyo, mid-century Bombay, late-century Hong-Kong --we examine the familiar and foreign Asian city as site of cinematic production and consumption in the local, national, and global contexts of various Asian cinemas.

Problems in 19th Century Photographic History

67500
ARTH 46900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2002-2003
J. Snyder

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