Documentary Production 2

23931
33931
ARTV 23931, ARTV 33931, HMRT 25107, HMRT 35107
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2015-2016
J. Hoffman

This course focuses on the shaping and crafting of a nonfiction video. Students are expected to write a treatment detailing their project. Production techniques focus on the handheld camera versus tripod, interviewing and microphone placement, and lighting for the interview. Postproduction covers editing techniques and distribution strategies. Students then screen final projects in a public space.

Russian Cinema

24505
34505
REES 26048/36048
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2015-2016
R. Bird

Russian cinema occupies an important and distinctive place within world film culture. It rose to prominence in the 1920s through the revolutionary (in all senses) films and film theory of Sergei Eisenstein, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Dziga Vertov and others and maintained its distinction through the early years of socialist realism, a unique media system in which film was recognized, in Lenin’s saying, as “the most important of the arts.” After Stalin’s death Russian film re-captivated its revolutionary energy amidst the “Soviet new wave,” characterized by the films of Mikhail Kalatozov, Sergei Paradzhanov and Andrei Tarkovsky. In recent years film has continued to play a crucial role in defining and animating a post-Soviet cultural identity, both through poetic filmmakers as Aleksandr Sokurov and through genre films. We will survey this history, from 1917 right up to the present moment, with a selection of the most energizing films and theoretical writings by their makers. We will examine how a national style gets established and maintained; how film form and film style have responded to the pressures of ideology and power; how film art has served both as a tool of colonialization and identity-formation; and how film artists have negotiated the pressures of cultural tradition (including that of the Russian novel) and the world film market.

Framing the I: Autobiography and Film

25531
35531
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2015-2016
D. Bluher

Cinema offers almost endless ways of telling one’s own story – diaries, confessions, album, travelogues, accounts of a distressing period, letters, searches for one’s origins, autobiographies, self-portraits, work notes, autofictions – and filmmakers continually create new hybrid forms that innovate or transgress former “genres.” This seminar examines film history’s various modes of autobiographical discourse in the context of philosophical and psychoanalytic considerations of the self as well as of experiments in literary and pictorial self-representation. Depending on the students background and interest, the final project can consist in a research paper, or in a creative work

Contemporary Film Theory 1: Ideology and Critique

27240
37240
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2015-2016
D. Rodowick

This two part course provides a critical and historical survey of the major questions, concepts, and trends in film theory since 1968.  Contemporary Film Theory I will examine theories of ideology and cinema, political modernism, and counter-cinema through the critical reading of important texts and films from Latin America, France, and the United Kingdom.

Aesthetics of Media: Image, Music, Text

27800
37800
ENGL 12810, ENGL 32810
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2015-2016
W.J.T. Mitchell

History of International Cinema 2

28600
48600
ARTH 28600,ARTH 38600,CMLT 22500,CMLT 32500, ENGL 29600,ENGL 48900,MAPH 33700,ARTV 26600
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2015-2016
D. Morgan

The center of this course is film style, from the classical scene breakdown to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation, and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting). The development of a film culture is also discussed. Texts include Thompson and Bordwell's Film History: An Introduction; and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, and Godard. Screenings include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

Philosophy and Film

67310
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2015-2016
D. Morgan/ R. Neer

This seminar addresses the intersection of aesthetics, post-analytic philosophy, and cinema. We are interested in a range of questions organized around issues of style and ethics; in particular, we hope to explore the role that criteria play in aesthetic judgments, and how these criteria might relate to the ones that support other sorts of judgments (about skepticism and the external world; seriousness; and the historical past). Our wager is that cinema can generate such questions and demonstrate both their significance and their mutual interrelation. Rather than rehearsing arguments to the effect that cinema can attain the condition of philosophy, we hope to chart new routes of analytic description. To that end we will work through films by Mizoguchi, Welles, Chaplin, Lubitsch, Bresson, Godard, Malick, and Baillie, with readings from Cavell, Burch, Wittgenstein, Aumont, Austin, Chion and others.

Style and Performance from Stage to Screen

68400
ARTH 48905
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2015-2016
Y. Tsivian

Actor is the oldest profession among arts. Cinema is the youngest art there is. What happens with faces, gestures, monologues and voices; ancient skills like dance or mime; grand histrionics etc. when arts of performance hit the medium of screen?  This course will focus on the history of acting styles in silent films, mapping "national" styles of acting that emerged during the 1910s (American, Danish, Italian, Russian) and various "acting schools" that proliferated during the 1920s ("Expressionist acting," "Kuleshov's Workshop," et al.). We will discuss film acting in the context of various systems of stage acting (Delsarte, Stanislavsky, Meyerhold) and the visual arts.

Introduction to Film

10100
ARTH 20000,ENGL 10800,ARTV 25300
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
M. Kressbach

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Film and the Moving Image

14400
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
D. Morgan

This course seeks to develop skills in perception, comprehension, and interpretation when dealing with film and other moving image media. It encourages the close analysis of audiovisual forms, their materials and formal attributes, and explores the range of questions and methods appropriate to the explication of a given film or moving image text. It also examines the intellectual structures basic to the systematic study and understanding of moving images. Most importantly, the course aims to foster in students the ability to translate this understanding into verbal expression, both oral and written. Texts and films are drawn from the history of narrative, experimental, animated, and documentary or non-fiction cinema. Screenings are a mandatory course component.

This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

Film and the Moving Image

14400
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
R. Neer

This course seeks to develop skills in perception, comprehension, and interpretation when dealing with film and other moving image media. It encourages the close analysis of audiovisual forms, their materials and formal attributes, and explores the range of questions and methods appropriate to the explication of a given film or moving image text. It also examines the intellectual structures basic to the systematic study and understanding of moving images. Most importantly, the course aims to foster in students the ability to translate this understanding into verbal expression, both oral and written. Texts and films are drawn from the history of narrative, experimental, animated, and documentary or non-fiction cinema. Screenings are a mandatory course component. 

This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

Cinema in Theory and Practice

14503
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
D. Bluher

The course proposes an introduction to audio-visual literacy through the analysis of films, selective readings, and short film exercises focusing on fundamental cinematic elements such as shot, framing, point of view, camera movement, editing, and relations of image and sound. Assignments will consist in in writing review sheets and a formal film analysis, and in creating 1-3 minute single-shot movies based on the works seen and discussed in class.

This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

Margins of the Medium: Text/Image

14507
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
J. Wild

In this class, we will study  nineteenth and twentieth-century visual and written texts from primarily French photographic, literary, painterly, and cinematic traditions. These thematically interrogate spatial, cultural, geographic, social, and political margins.  By also examining the long-standing and often fraught historical and theoretical relationship between text and image, we will simultaneously investigate the boundaries between divergent media practices (photography, literature, film, painting) in order to question the visual, narrative, and philosophic limits of representation.

This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical and visual arts.

Latin American Cinema: 1930 to the Present

23906
LACS 23906
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
S. Skvirsky

This course will survey Latin American cinema from the 1930s to the present. We will begin by considering the efforts of the Brazilian and Mexican states to create commercially-viable, popular, national cinemas in the 30s, 40s, and 50s. Our screenings will include Maria Candelaría (Emilio Fernandez, Mexico, 1943) and Carnaval Atlântida (José Carlos Burle and Carlos Manga, Brazil, 1952). In the second unit we will examine the classic works of the New Latin American Cinema from the 60s and 70s. These were the challenging political films that “introduced” Latin American cinema to the rest of the world. Our screenings will include Memories of Underdevelopment (Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, Cuba,1968) and The Jackal of Nahueltoro (Miguel Littín, Chile, 1969). In the third unit we will come to the twenty-first century, examining the newest new wave of Latin American film—its thematics, its sources of funding, its circuits of distribution, and its global reach. Our screenings will include The Swamp (Lucrecia Martel, Argentina, 2001), Edifício Master (Eduardo Coutinho, Brazil, 2002), Additions and Subtractions (Víctor Gaviria, Colombia, 2004), Leap Year(Michael Rowe, Mexico, 2010), and Neighboring Sounds (Kleber Mendonça, Brazil, 2012).

Cold War Cinema

24506
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
Z. Mandusic

Taking a comparative approach to films made in the United States and the Soviet Union during the period of the Cold War, this course will survey how the long-running confrontation of two global superpowers, understood as both a political conflict and a cultural phenomenon, mobilized a range of styles, genres, and film technology in the decades-long battle of claims and images. Beginning with the pre-history of the conflict and extending to its perceived conclusion in the late 1980s, we will consider cinema’s role in presenting, shaping, and questioning archetypal images and narratives. We will examine what aspects of cinema lend themselves to political agitation, by considering how American and Soviet bureaucrats and filmmakers made use of cinematographic elements to assert ideological claims and to reinforce them through appeals to the senses. Along with the influence of politics on film production and aesthetics, we will consider cinematic reflections of Cold War events such as the U.S.-Soviet Cultural Exchange Agreement of 1958 and the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. As we chart the history of Cold War film styles and their strategies, we will consider both explicitly propagandistic films as well as those that stray from the conflict’s headline issues, but have significant bearing on it.

Issues in Film Sound

28003
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
J. Lastra

Description to come.

Cowboy Modernity

24531
34531
MAPH 35514
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
M. Hauske

This course examines the western movie genre through the lens of what is thought of as the cinema’s special relationship to and place within twentieth century modernity. From the beginnings of narrative cinema through the 1960s, more westerns were made than any other genre, and the iconography and ideology of the western influenced not only other film genres but also spilled over into other aspects of popular culture and even high art. Why was the cinema, the medium that exemplified modernity for so many people around the world, dominated by westerns, a genre set in the past and in the wilderness? How did the western manifest aspects, anxieties, possibilities, and widespread phenomena of twentieth century modernity? We will examine the western’s intersection with modern phenomena, activities, and artforms including tourism, abstract expressionism, feminism, the Baby Boom & television, toys, mining and atomic energy and weapons, and the rise of Las Vegas as a hub for recreational gambling. Written texts will include contemporaneous film reviews and scholarship by the likes of Andre Bazin, Siegfried Kracauer, Robert Warshow, Bosley Crowther, and others. We will also pay special attention to contemporaneous scholarship on the emerging white-collar class and conformist culture, which westerns provided an alternative and respite from. Scholars will include Herbert Marcuse, C. Wright Mills, and William Whyte. We will watch mostly mainstream Hollywood westerns, by John Ford, Nicholas Ray, Andre de Toth, Delmer Daves, Howard Hawks, Samuel Fuller, and others, but independent films, cartoons, television shows, and films set in the present day will also be consulted.

Chinese Independent Documentary Film

24607
34607
EALC 24607/34607
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
P. Iovene

This course explores the styles and functions of Chinese independent documentary since 1989, with particular attention to the institutional, social, economic, and political contexts that underpin its flourishing. We will discuss the ways in which recent Chinese documentaries challenge current theories of the genre, how they redefine the relationship between fiction and non-fiction, and the problems of form, political intervention, and ethics of representation that they pose. We will look at their channels of circulation in Asia and elsewhere, and will discuss the political implications and limits of “independent” documentary in the wake of intensified globalization. In addition, we will consider recent influential feature films characterized by a “documentary style.” Readings will include theorizations of the documentary genre in relation to other visual media and narrative forms, analyses of specific works, and overviews of recent transformations in Chinese media.

Cities in Sinophone Cinema

24611
34611
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
X. Dong

From the treaty port of Shanghai to the imperial capital of Beijing, from the “re-colonized” city of Taipei to the “floating city” of Hong Kong, and from an anonymous city in inland China to global Chinatowns, cities in Chinese-language cinemas at once reflect and participate in the historical transformations of modern China and the negotiation between national, local and cosmopolitan identities. Meanwhile, throughout its history, the motion-picture medium has shown an affinity with the city as an audio-visual ensemble, which in turn has provided constant inspiration for cinematic experimentation. Taking the chronotope of the “sinophone city” as an entry point, this course participates in both the on-going discussion of cinematic cities and the emerging discourse on the phonic articulation and visual mediation of a global sinophone culture. No knowledge of Chinese is required.

D. W. Griffith

26405
36405
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
Y. Tsivian

D.W. Griffith

26405
36405
FNDL 26405,AMER 26405,AMER 36405
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
Y. Tsivian

Controversies fuel American politics and culture. One hundred years ago, Intolerance shook the world, if not the most famous, then the most the most expensive and seminal movie ever made. One hundred and one, The Birth of a Nation generated the loudest controversy on the issue of race; at the same time, its powerful suspense sequence in the finale made this movie a fundamental of action-movie filmmaking for the century to come. Griffith came to movie industry in 1908 and dropped out of it in 1931. This course offers a quarter-of-a-century vast panorama of inventions and innovations, shames and triumphs, brilliant successes and spectacular failures connected with D.W. Griffith, the most famous pioneer in the history of film. 

Film Aesthetics

27205
37205
PHIL 20208, PHIL 30208
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
R. Pippin; J. Conant

The main questions to be discussed are: the bearing of cinema on philosophy; or in what sense, if any, is cinema a form of philosophical thought? What sort of distinctive aesthetic object is a film, or what is the “ontology” of film? What, in particular, distinguishes a “realist” narrative film? What is a “Hollywood” film? What is a Hollywood genre? Authors to be read include, among others, Bazin, Cavell, Perkins, Wilson, Rothman. Films to be seen and discussed, among others, include films by Bresson, Ford, Ophuls, Cukor, Hitchcock, and the Dardenne brothers.

Movement

27206
37206
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
D. Morgan

Movement is central to the history of cinema, from its earliest origins and antecedents to the GoPro and related videos that currently populate.YouTube, and to the history of thinking about it. This course investigates the various ways in which movement has appeared and been talked about. Combining philosophical, critical, and historical readings with careful analysis of films, we will cover topics that include the appeal of moving image itself, movement that exists within the world shown in the frame, problems posed by the history of camera movement, and different technologies for recording and producing movement. Readings will include Bergson, Eisenstein, Merleau-Ponty, McLaren, Michotte, Deleuze, and Gunning; films will be from the Lumière Brothers, Murnau, Renoir, Mizoguchi, Ophuls, Breer, Gehr, Raimi, Malick, and others.

Contemporary Film Theory 2: Spectatorship and its Discontents

27241
37241
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
D. Rodowick

This two part course provides a critical and historical survey of the major questions, concepts, and trends in film theory since 1968.  Organized broadly around questions of film, ideology, and spectatorship, weekly readings, films, and discussion will examine how the study of film in the last forty years has been influenced by semiology, psychoanalysis, Marxism, postmodernism, feminism, critical race studies, gay and lesbian criticism, and post-colonial theory, especially with respect to theories of spectatorship.

Cinema, Play, Modernity

27504
37504
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
X. Dong

In this course we explore the idea of an international “ludic cinema” in the first half of the twentieth century. Our goal is two-fold: on the one hand, we will identify the trajectory of a ludic modernism in film history by rereading canons and introducing underexposed films; on the other hand, we will examine the interdisciplinary writings on the notion of play, ranging from anthropology and psychology to education and literary studies, through the prism of cinematic modernity. Readings include seminal texts by Walter Benjamin, Johan Huizinga, Roger Caillois, D. W. Winnicott, and Gregory Bateson, as well as more recent scholarly works by Miriam Hansen, Bill Brown, David Bordwell and Kristine Thompson. Films include early short and experimental films, city symphonies, American slapstick comedies, and films by Ernst Lubitsch, Jean Renoir, Frank Capra, Fei Mu, Yasujiro Ozu, and Jacques Tati.

Minimalist Experiment in Film and Video

28006
38006
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
D. Rodowick

This multilevel studio will investigate minimalist strategies in artists’ film and video from the late 1960s to the present day.  Emphasis will be placed on works made with limited means and/or with “amateur” formats such as Super-8 and 16mm film, camcorders, Flip cameras, SLR video, and iPhone or iPad.  Our aim is to imagine how to produce complex results from economical means.  Important texts will be paired with in class discussion of works by artists such as Andy Warhol, Yoko Ono, Kurt Kren, Jack Goldstein, Larry Gottheim, Bruce Baillie, James Benning, John Baldessari, Morgan Fisher, Stan Douglas, Matthew Buckingham, Sam Taylor-Wood, and others.

Data Visualization: Aesthetics, Intent, and Practice

38007
CDIN 40333, ARTV 40333, CMSC 33950
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
J. Salavon and G. Kindlmann

This course investigates how data visualizations are made and used today.  Addressing a lack of both critical attention and technical literacy in how our society engages with increasingly common and sophisticated data-driven representations, we will retrace some history of the form as well as investigate its production and consumption. From uses in the sciences to economics to the popular media, data visualization serves various purposes framed by divergent intentions. Through reading, discussion, and crucially, team-based production, we will examine these myriad forms. While the course will not dwell on the deep computational details of data processing and requires no special technical skills, we will introduce various methodologies for creation and distribution such as D3, Processing, and P5.js. Projects and critique resulting from these inquiries enable an understanding for how any data visualization is the result of countless subjective judgments, design decisions, and persuasive intentions.

Non-Fiction Film: Representation and Performance

28200
38200
HMRT 25101,ARTV 25100,ARTV 35100,HMRT 35101
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
J. Hoffman

We will attempt to define Non-Fiction cinema by examining its major modes. These include the Documentary, Essay, Ethnographic, and Political/Agit-prop film, as well as personal/autobiographical and Experimental works that are less easily classifiable. We will explore some of the theoretical discourses that surround this most philosophical of film genres, such as the ethics and politics of representation, and the shifting lines between fact and fiction, truth and reality. The relationship between the Documentary and the State will be examined in light of the genre’s tendency to inform and instruct. We will consider the tensions of filmmaking and the performative aspects in front of the lens, as well as the performance of the camera itself. Finally, we will look at the ways in which distribution and television effect the production and content of Non-fiction film.

Introduction to 16mm Filmmaking

28921
38921
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
T. Comerford

The goal of this intensive laboratory course is to give its students a working knowledge of film production using the 16mm gauge. The course will emphasize how students can use 16mm technology towards successful cinematography and image design (for use in both analog and digital post production scenarios) and how to develop their ideas towards constructing meaning through moving pictures. Through a series of group exercises, students will put their hands on equipment and solve technical and aesthetic problems, learning to operate and care for the 16mm Bolex film camera; prime lenses; Sekonic light meter; Sachtler tripod; and Arri light kit and accessories. For a final project, students will plan and produce footage for an individual or small group short film. The first half the class will be highly structured, with demonstrations, in-class shoots and lectures. As the semester continues, classtime will open up to more of a workshop format to address the specific concerns and issues that arise in the production of the final projects. This course is made possible by the Charles Roven Fund for Cinema and Media Studies.

The Body of Cinema: Hypnoses, Emotions, Animalities

27803
47803
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
R. Bellour

The aim of this course is to transmit in the most detailed possible way the constitutive éléments of my book Le Corps du cinema - hypnoses, émotions, animalités (P.O.L, Paris, 2009, 640 p.). I have tempted to present there a general view of cinema from three related points of view : hypnosis as a general correspondance of dispositif  between the hypnotic and the cinematographic situations; emotion as what is bodily and mentally produced through the experience of the films to which the spectators are submitted: animality as an inner dimension of the bodily experience, incarnated by the overwhelming presence of animals in so many and so many films through the whole develoment of cinema history. Those three words appear plural in the subtitle of the book as there are different levels and modes caracterizing those three major instances, and in a way as many as there are different individual spectators (also male or female).

NOTE: This is a six-week intensive seminar meeting twice a week for three hours each meeting. April 18-May 25, 2016.

The L.A. Rebellion and the Politics of Black Cinema

61102
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
A. Field

This seminar examines the L.A. Rebellion, a group of predominantly African and African American filmmakers working at and around UCLA in the 1970s-80s including Julie Dash, Haile Gerima, Charles Burnett, Billy Woodberry, Barbara McCullough, and others. We will look at their films in the larger contexts of the politics of Black filmmaking, race in American cinema, Black film cultures of the 1970s, independent film practices, and the social, political, and cultural environments of the films' production. Topics include representations of urban life; class, gender, and family; race and representation; post-Watts Rebellion Los Angeles; Hollywood and Blaxploitation; documentary practices; the avant-garde. We will also discuss debates around collective art movements; archival practices; and critical models for the study of African American cinema. Screenings will include films and video work recently preserved and restored as part of the L.A. Rebellion Preservation Project.

Cinema and Labor

69002
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
S. Skvirsky

Description to come.

The Archive: Materiality, Aesthetics, Visual Culture

69110
FREN 49100, ARTH 49700
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2015-2016
J. Wild

In this research-intensive graduate seminar, students will engage with a range of methods, questions, and approaches to conducting archival research in filmic, paper and print, and internet databases, and in both American and foreign contexts. While some class content will unfold around archival materials related to French film and art practice between 1930-1950, and to the discursive transformations around concepts of materiality and visual aesthetics therein, we will also explore a range of texts on archival methodology; selected texts on archival theory; and case-studies foregrounding modes of archival discovery, evaluation, and interpretation. With the aim of training students for “deep dive” explorations of material and visual culture, students will be expected to conduct original research on a topic of their own design beginning in week 2. To be considered for this seminar, interested students should thus submit a short (1-2 paragraph) research proposal prior to registration. Proposals do not have to focus on French or Francophone topics, nor do they have to be fully developed. They must, however, propose a set of coherent and exploratory, if tentative, questions or propositions that the student will explore through intensive archival research. Proposals should be sent to jenniferwild@uchicago.edu at least 2 weeks prior to spring quarter 2016.

NB: All students (doctoral, MAPH, or MAPS) who are interested in this seminar, but who do not have a specific research question, agenda, or object, are nevertheless encouraged to enroll. Such students will be provided with directed questions, topics, or objects for archival research, or research related to the theoretical dimensions of the archive. These students may work collaboratively or in small groups with the aim of building a foundation in primary research methods and objectives, which will lead to a final dossier on their research findings, methodological challenges, roadblocks, and breakthroughs.

Introduction to Film

10100
ARTH 20000,ENGL 10800,ARTV 25300
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2014-2015
J. Stewart

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Required of students majoring in Cinema and Media Studies

Cinema in Theory and Practice

14503
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2014-2015
D. Bluher

The course proposes an introduction to audio-visual literacy through the analysis of films, selective readings, and short film exercises focusing on fundamental cinematic elements such as shot, framing, point of view, camera movement, editing, and relations of image and sound. Assignments will consist in in writing review sheets and a formal film analysis, and in creating three 1-3 minute single-shot movies based on the works seen and discussed in class.

Open only to non-CMS majors. This course has been approved to fulfill the Arts Music Drama Core requirement for undergraduates.

Cinema and New Media

27810
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2014-2015
D. Morgan

Over the past two decades, new media such as television, computers and the web, digital image production, and video games have begun to transform, and even supplant, the social and cultural prominence of cinema. This course will look at how these media work: the history of their development, the changes they have brought about in a broader media culture, their political implications, and their social status and significance (e.g., the place they occupy in culture, the kinds of interactions they make possible). The focus will equally be on the ways in which cinema has responded to the changing digital landscape, which will be explored through both blockbust and experimental films as well as video and web-based art. Readings will be taken from the history of film theory, recent work in media history and archeology, and theoretical studies of digitial media and technology.

Pre-requisite(s): CMST 10100, ARTH 20000, ENGL 10800, ARTV 25300, or consent of instructor.

Senior Colloquium

29800
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2014-2015
J. Wild

This seminar is designed to provide fourth-year students with a sense of the variety of methods and approaches in the field (e.g., formal analysis, cultural history, industrial history, reception studies, psychoanalysis). Students present material related to their BA project, which is discussed in relation to the issues of the course.

Pre-requisite(s): CMST 10100, ARTH 20000, ENGL 10800, ARTV 25300, or consent of instructor.

Documentary Production I

23930
33930
ARTV 23930, ARTV 33930, HMRT 25106, HMRT 35106
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2014-2015
J. Hoffman

This class is intended to develop skills in documentary production so that students may apply for Documentary Production II. Documentary Production I focuses on the making of independent documentary video. Examples of various styles of documentary will be screened and discussed. Issues embedded in the documentary genre, such as the ethics and politics of representation and the shifting lines between fact and fiction will be explored. Pre-production methodologies, production, and post-production techniques will be taught. Students will be expected to develop an idea for a documentary video, crews will be formed, and each crew will produce a five-minute documentary. Students will also be expected to purchase an external hard drive.

Pre-requisite(s): Prior or concurrent enrollment in CMST 10100 is strongly recommended.

The Return of the Soviet: War in Soviet and Post-Soviet Media (Ukraine, Belarus)

24405
34405
RUSS 24201, RUSS 34201
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2014-2015
A. Gornykh

The current war in Ukraine has shown dramatically the power of visual media to construct social and military conflicts, especially in the post-Soviet borderlands. Some observers believe that the media  have created a new geopolitical reality as a kind of phantasm, which explains why in the vast majority of the population in post-Soviet Russia, Belarus and eastern Ukraine support the existing power structures uncritically and even unconditionally. Taking the current situation as a cue, we seek to understand how ideological mechanisms work within visual representations, primarily in representations of war, especially in the construction of the enemy. The roots of the current Russo-Ukrainian conflict will be traced through representations of the Battle of Stalingrad in Soviet and post-Soviet cinema; the image of the partisan in Soviet and post-Soviet media; the work on film of Andrei Tarkovsky, as a symptom of the dialectic of war in Soviet modernity. The representations at issue will mostly be taken from fictional film, but attention will also be paid to other forms of cultural representation: literature, documentary film, television and new media. We will be guided by theoretical resources from critical theory (Marx, Weber, Foucault, Jameson) and psychoanalysis (Freud, Zizek).

East European Horror Film

25521
35521
EEUR 39301
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2014-2015
M. Sternstein

Eastern Europe has menaced the "enlightened" West for centuries. It remains to this day a valuable source for negotiating the West’s phantasies. One need only look at the rich and varied story of the vampire through popular culture from the 18th-century revenant to the 21st-century sex symbol and family man to confirm this fascination. Eastern Europe (and I use this term here to conform to popular discourse) is the West’s necessary construct to enforce the ideation of its own health and weal. In this course contemporary horror film produced both within and without Eastern Europe—and at times in partnership with the “West”—but all with the East as haunt, landscape, and affect are discussed with the West’s and East’s anxieties (social, political, artistic) in mind. Films include Eli Roth’s Hostel franchise, Julie Delpy’s The Countess, Timur Bekmambetov’s Night Watch and Day Watch, Aleksey Balabanov’s Cargo 200, Nacho Cerdà’s The Abandoned, György Palfi’s Taxidermia, and the highly controversial A Serbian Film directed by Srđan Spasojević. Readings range from work on defining the horror genre to philosophies of anxiety to critical interrogations of specific films. This class contains films with scenes that ought to be disturbing. 

 

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