Courses

Barthes: Text & Image

48711
GRMN 48711, ARTH 48711
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2010-2011
S. Ludemann, N. Steimatsky

Roland Barthes's incisive criticism stands as a major contribution to literary theory, to the semiotics of culture, and to contemporary conceptions of the image – still and moving. His work spans a wide variety of topics (including literature, photography, film, mythology, fashion, advertising, conversation, sport, love, and himself), propelling semiotics, anthropology, psychoanalysis, and post-structuralism towards an incisive and eloquent reflection. Although Barthes did not develop an explicit theory of the imaginary, the relationship of texts and images, the symbolic and the imaginary, are among his constant concerns. Are images 'just another type of text', or is there an independent sphere of the imaginary which escapes structural, or even cultural analysis? This question will be among the guiding themes of the seminar. All principal readings are in English.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2010-2011
Staff

Consent of instructor. Please register by faculty section.

The Silent Avant-Garde

65201
  • Graduate
  • Winter
  • 2010-2011
J. Wild

This course will examine the long-standing relationship between the cinema and primarily European and American avant-garde artists and movements between 1890 and 1935. By exploring the theoretical, practical, and more conceptual adoption of the cinema by artists working across media, this course will ask how the cinema and filmmaking practices transformed the history and theory of vanguardism. The following movements will be considered: Les Incohérants; Futurism (Italian and Russian); Cubism; Vorticism; Dada; Constructivism; Surrealism; the Cinéclub movement and little magazines dedicated to modernism will also be studied. Emphasis will be placed on primary documents and significant cultural events and manifestations of the period, but classic theories of the avant-garde will also be read (Bürger, Poggioli). Films by Bauer, Bragaglia, Ivens, Léger, Clair, Moholy-Nagy, Steiner, Richter, Ruttmann, Vertov, Dulac, Epstein and others will be shown.

Introduction to Film I

10100
ARTH 20000, ARTV 25300, ENGL 10800, ISHU 20000
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
Staff

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Israeli Cinema: Identity, Memory, Narrative, Conflict

24802
NEHC 24802
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
D. Galili

The current version of the description reads: "This class surveys the history of Israeli film as well as critical methods with which to approach it. The principal interest of the class is to examine Israeli films as a “national cinema” by considering the various ways in which they reflect, enforce, and perpetuate – and also criticize and deconstruct – the dominant Israeli national ideologies and myths. We will explore how the developing Israeli film industry related in different historical moments to the efforts of the Israeli state to define its own identity, history, borders and aesthetic traditions, and discuss the film in light of topics such as the Zionist conception of Jewish history, the trauma of the holocaust, the project of Israeli nation- building, and the changes in Israeli culture’s representations of “others” on grounds of nationality, religion, ethnicity, and gender. Class screenings will include Israeli films that range from the pre- Israeli state Zionist propaganda films, to the nationalistic-heroic cinema of the young state, the mid- 1960s attempts at establishing an “Israeli New Wave,” and to today’s unprecedented international critical and commercial success of Israeli cinema."

The American Avant-Garde Cinema

25513
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
A. Hart

There has been an alternative cinema in the United States from the earliest days of Hollywood, but it wasn’t until the 1940s, with the first works of such figures as Joseph Cornell, Kenneth Anger and, especially, Maya Deren, that disparate film artists came together in what would become a coherent avant-garde filmmaking community or movement. Inspired by developments in poetry, dance, painting, and music, and by European filmmakers like Sergei Eisenstein and Jean Cocteau, these filmmakers set about creating a new genre of film, and a new kind of film language. A remarkable flourishing of independent, personal cinema soon followed, in an incredible variety of styles. This class will look at the historical development of the American avant-garde cinema from these early filmmakers through the intensely creative, productive period of the 1960s, and the fragmented state of the avant-garde in the years that followed. Using methodologies taken from cinema studies and other disciplines, especially art history, and looking at the films alongside contemporaneous work in other mediums, we will attempt to develop a valid critical language to describe and analyze these sui generis films and filmmakers. Filmmakers studied include Deren, Anger, Cornell, Stan Brakhage, Bruce Baillie, Bruce Conner, Jack Smith, Andy Warhol, Michael Snow, Paul Sharits, Ernie Gehr, Hollis Frampton, Jonas Mekas and Joyce Wieland.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Agitation and Propaganda

24905
34905
EALC 24905/34905
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
M. Raine

5/34905 This class traces the deployment of cinema as both national culture and "optical weapon" during a time of total war. We will study the Film Law of 1939 and the "national policy films" and "people's films" that attempted to raise the aesthetic and technical level of cinema in Japan in order to compete with the memory of Hollywood films both at "home" and in the Asian countries occupied by Japan. The class will include films made under Japanese sponsorship in the colonies of Taiwan and Korea as well as in the puppet state of Manchuria and the occupied territory of Shanghai. We will also study local sources of wartime Japanese cinema -- the prewar leftist film movement, the documentary film movement, the narrative avant-garde -- in the context of the broader image culture of wartime Japan. No knowledge of Japanese is required: separate section for discussion of Japanese and other Asian sources.

Cinema in Wartime Japan and its Territories

34906
EALC 44905
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
M. Raine

This seminar explores the history of cinema as a new medium for "propaganda and agitation" in the context of Japan's wars in Asia and the Pacific, 1937-1945. The emphasis is less on policy decisions than on their cultural consequences: how did the Tripartite Alliance, the Film Law, and the military situation affect the production, distribution, and reception of cinema in Japan and the occupied territories? What are the connections between cinema and other media and is there such a thing as a wartime style? In brief, the argument of the course is that propaganda in Japan, as elsewhere, was part of a broader project of agitation. Cinema was treated as a new medium, specially tasked not only to convey "information" but to elicit intense emotions from subjects of the nation, the Empire, and local military power that justified their suffering. That project often relied to a surprising extent on medium-specific, even modernist, modes of representation. We will study Japanese films in the context of a global 1930s "reactionary modernism" while simultaneously exploring more local sources of wartime cinema, in the prewar leftist film movement, the documentary film movement, the narrative avant-garde, and the broader image culture of wartime Japan. We will also explore how the medium was deployed in Japan's colonies (Taiwan and Korea), client states (Manchuria), and occupied territories (Eastern China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, the Philippines, etc). This history of cinema highlights concepts that are essential to broader histories of the period: for example: identity, complicity, nationality, and collaboration. English will be the lingua-franca for the course but we will also read primary and secondary Japanese documents, and material in other languages.

Documentary Video: Production Techniques

28001
38001
ARTV 23902, HMRT 25103/35103
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
J. Hoffman

ARTV 23901 or consent of instructor. This course focuses on the shaping and crafting of a nonfiction video. Students are expected to write a treatment detailing their project. Production techniques focus on the handheld camera versus tripod, interviewing and microphone placement, and lighting for the interview. Post-production covers editing techniques and distribution strategies. Students then screen final projects in a public space. Lab fee $50.

Political Documentary Film

28201
38201
ARTV 28204/38204
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
J. Hoffman

This course explores the political documentary film, its intersection with historical and cultural events, and its opposition to Hollywood and traditional media.  We will examine various documentary modes of production, from films with a social message, to advocacy and activist film, to counter-media and agit-prop.  We will also consider the relationship between the filmmaker, film subject and audience, and how political documentaries are disseminated and, most importantly, part of political struggle. 

Bresson Against Cinema

23801
43801
FREN 23801/33801
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
N. Steimatsky

Robert Bresson is one of the most ambitious, most enigmatic filmmakers. In an era of reflexive, ironic post-classical cinema, it sometimes seemed as though he sought to ignore film history altogether, to defy its habits and conventions – to re-invent the medium in his own terms. Yet Bresson delves deeply into questions of cinema as a mode of perception, of knowledge and belief, as a way to explore social being and singularity: the individual inextricably, often tragically bound in the transactions of modern life. In this course we will consider Bresson’s sources, his modes of narration, the relation of text and image, visual style and sound practice; we will seek to define the special mode of attention that his films command. [All readings are in English.]

Chinese-language Film Comedies

44612
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
X. Dong

With the exception of the Hong Kong martial arts comedies that have gained worldwide popularity in recent decades, comedy has not been a genre generally associated with Chinese-language cinemas. Yet precisely because of the "seriousness" of China’s long 20th century laden with suffering and crisis, Chinese-language comedies provide a concentrated site for the investigation of national cinema on the one hand and the generic conventions of comedy on the other. Various modes of production and style will be explored in this course, including slapstick comedy and costume drama in the silent era; left-wing romantic comedy in the 1930s; post-WWII screwball comedy; the post-1949 tripartite development of comedy in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan; Chinese-American "comedy of immigration"; as well as post-modern pastiche and dark comedy from the post-new-era to the 21st century. No knowledge of Chinese is required.

Dziga Vertov and His Time: Left-Wing Art, Avant-Garde Filmmaking, Radical Politics

46602
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
Y. Tsivian

The class explores the work of this seminal Soviet documentary filmmaker, his theory, its international impact, its cultural and political implications, various ways of how Vertov’s films and theories are viewed and interpreted nowadays. Note: All readings in English and all screenings with translations.

History of International Cinema, Part II, Sound Cinema to 1960

28600
48600
ArtH 28600/38600, ENGL 29600/48900, MAPH 33700
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
Y. Tsivian

This is the second part of the international survey history of film covering the sound era up to 1960. It is strongly recommended that students take the first section first. This survey will deal with issues of film form, industry organization and film culture during three decades, focusing on the crystallization of the Classical Hollywood Film as a key issue. But international alternatives to Hollywood will also be discussed, from the unique forms of Japanese cinema to movements like Italian Neo-realism and the beginnings of the New Wave in France. Film style, from the classical scene break down to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting) will form the center of the course, while attention will also be paid to the development of a film culture. Texts will include Bordwell and Thompson, Film History: An Introduction, and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, Godard and others. Screenings will include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

History of International Cinema, Part II, Sound Cinema to 1960

28600
48600
ArtH 28600/38600, ENGL 29600/48900, MAPH 33700
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
Y. Tsivian

This is the second part of the international survey history of film covering the sound era up to 1960. It is strongly recommended that students take the first section first. This survey will deal with issues of film form, industry organization and film culture during three decades, focusing on the crystallization of the Classical Hollywood Film as a key issue. But international alternatives to Hollywood will also be discussed, from the unique forms of Japanese cinema to movements like Italian Neo-realism and the beginnings of the New Wave in France. Film style, from the classical scene break down to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting) will form the center of the course, while attention will also be paid to the development of a film culture. Texts will include Bordwell and Thompson, Film History: An Introduction, and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, Godard and others. Screenings will include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
Staff

Consent of instructor. Please register by faculty section.

Seminar in the Moving and Projected Image

67000
  • Graduate
  • Spring
  • 2010-2011
T. Gunning

The moving image has a long history that precedes by centuries the invention of celluloid and is likely to last beyond the disappearance of film. This seminar will take a theoretical and historical approach to the basic donnees of the projected moving image, its relation to light, imagery and movement in order to rethink a tradition that includes but is not limited to photographic film, that makes use , but not exclusively, of narrative, and that explores the issues of light and shadow, and color, form and movement. The seminar will include screening demonstrations that are essential to it, so don’t consider enrolling if you can’t make them. The assumption is that students will have a good knowledge of basic film theory and history. Limited to doctoral students. Reading will include Bazin, Metz, Baudry, Mannoni, and others.

Introduction to Film I

10100
ARTH 20000, ARTV 25300, ENGL 10800, ISHU 20000
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
J. Wild

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres.  Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception.  Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles. 

Animals and Cinema: From Horror to Wildlife Documentary

21800
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
I. Pollman

From the first films on, animals have been a constant presence on the screen, whether in safari films, popular science films, avant-garde films, horror and sci-fi films, anthropomorphizing narrative films with animal stars, or wildlife documentaries. What is this fascination of the cinema with animals? How do our encounters with animals in the movie theater differ from encounters in zoos, at home, or in the wild? What happens to animals when they are technologically mediated, and what happens to (human) spectators in the film experience of wild, cute, strange, or horrifying creatures? In this course, we will examine films including Electrocution of an Elephant (1903), Starewicz’s insect stop motion animations, American creature features such as Tarantula, as well as Tourneur’s Cat People, Bresson’s Au Hasard Balthazar, Herzog’s Grizzly Man, and others. With the help of these films, we will investigate relationships among humans, animals and technology in modernity, as well as concepts of animation, life, and wildlife. This course will familiarize students with the philosophical background of the “question” of the animal and engage film criticism that focuses on the ways in which film communicates, mediates, and transforms creaturely life. The course will incorporate readings by André Bazin, Jacques Derrida, Giorgio Agamben, J.M. Coetzee, Donna Haraway, Akira Lippit, Mary Ann Doane, Gilles Deleuze, Dudley Andrew, and others. 

Pickford and the American Film Industry

21901
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
E. Binggeli

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

Senior Colloquium

29800
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
J. Lastra

CMST 10100. Required of all Cinema and Media Studies concentrators. This seminar is designed to provide senior concentrators with a sense of the variety of methods and approaches in the field (such as formal analysis, cultural history, industrial history, reception studies, psychoanalysis). Students will present material relating to their B.A. project, which will be discussed in relation to the issues of the course.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

American Cinema Since 1960

31900
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
M. Hansen

The year 1960 is commonly understood as a watershed in United States film history, marking the end of the so-called "classical" Hollywood cinema. We will discuss this assumption in terms of the break-up of the studio system; the erosion of the Production Code; the crisis of audience precipitated by television's mass spread; and the changing modes of film reception, production, and style under the impact of video, cable, and other electronic communication technologies. We will also relate cinema to social and political issues of the post-1960s period (Civil Rights, student and women's movements, the Vietnam war, urban crisis, reproductive freedom, AIDS, the Reagan/Bush era, and the end of the Cold War) and ask how films reflected upon and intervened in contested areas of public and private experience. With the help of the concept of "genre" (and the changed "genericity" of 1980s and '90s films) and of the notion of "national cinema" (usually applied to film traditions other than the United States), we will attempt a dialogue between industrial/stylistic and cultural-studies approaches to film history.

Neorealism: Space, Culture, History

23000
33000
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
N. Steimatsky

Following the traumatic devastations of Fascism, the physical and moral collapse of World War II, filmmakers such as Rossellini, Visconti, and De Sica (to cite only the most famous) offered the most immediate and influential responses to reconstruction of postwar Europe.  Neorealism thus became a model for the renewal of cinemas everywhere, binding a new ethic and aesthetic of filmmaking in ways that remain exemplary for other nations and minorities to this day.  In its renewed exploration of space and location, temporality and history, neorealism was also a central reference for artists, architects, and writers.  This course will interlace key neorealist feature films with lesser known works, including documentaries and shorts, offering fresh perspectives on one of the most influential movements in film history.  All readings in English.

From La Dolce Vita to the Murder of Pasolini

23001
33001
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
N. Steimatsky

Following the traumatic devastations of Fascism, the physical and moral collapse of World War II, filmmakers such as Rossellini, Visconti, and De Sica (to cite only the most famous) offered the most immediate and influential responses to reconstruction of postwar Europe.  Neorealism thus became a model for the renewal of cinemas everywhere, binding a new ethic and aesthetic of filmmaking in ways that remain exemplary for other nations and minorities to this day.  In its renewed exploration of space and location, temporality and history, neorealism was also a central reference for artists, architects, and writers.  This course will interlace key neorealist feature films with lesser known works, including documentaries and shorts, offering fresh perspectives on one of the most influential movements in film history.  All readings in English.

Introduction to Film Production

28920
38920
ARTV 23850/33850, HMRT 25102/35102
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
J. Hoffman

This intensive laboratory will be an introduction to 16mm film production, experimenting with various film stocks and basic lighting designs. The class will be organized around a series of production situations and students will work in crews. Each crew will learn to operate and maintain the 16mm Bolex film camera, tripod; Arri lights, gels, diffusion, and grip equipment. The final project will be an in camera edit. No prerequisites. Lab fee $100.

Methods and Issues in Cinema Studies

40000
ENGL 48000, MAPH 33000
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
T. Gunning

This course offers an introduction to ways of reading, writing on, and teaching film. The focus of discussion will range from methods of close analysis and basic concepts of film form, technique and style; through industrial/critical categories of genre and authorship (studios, stars, directors); through aspects of the cinema as a social institution, psycho-sexual apparatus and cultural practice; to the relationship between filmic texts and the historical horizon of production and reception. Films discussed will include works by Griffith, Lang, Hitchcock, Deren, Godard.

Perception and Understanding of Multimedia

41500
CDIN 51500, MUSI 45010, PSYC 41501
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
B. Hoeckner

In light of the proliferation of film, television, and recently the internet, this course investigates the perception and understanding of multimedia and their effect on cultural production and social relations.  The course offers an introduction to empirical research on multimedia in social and cognitive psychology and neuroscience, which will be considered in conjunction with critical issues of multimedia research in the humanities. Participants will conduct an actual empirical study, preferably as a collaboration between participants from the humanities and the social sciences.  Topics may include the role of attention, memory, emotion, and value judgment in multimedia and their relation to complex manifestations of social behavior, such as artistic production, advertisement, and journalism. A recurring theme of the course will be the relationship between sound and image.  To enable empirical research, ten seminar sessions will be spread out over the entire academic year, with five introductory sessions in the fall quarter, three sessions devoted to the preparation of pilot studies in the winter quarter, and two final sessions discussing results of the actual experiments in the spring quarter.  Participants should come away from the course with the understanding and experience that it is possible and productive to combine critical methods in the humanities with the empirical approaches in the natural and social sciences.

Styles of Performance and Expression from Stage to Screen

48402
CMLT 40900, SLAV 48402
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
Y. Tsivian

This seminar will focus on the history of acting styles in silent film (1895-1930) mapping "national" styles of acting that emerged during the 1910s (American, Danish, Italian, Russian) and various "acting schools" that proliferated during the 1920s ("Expressionist acting," "Kuleshov's workshop," etc). We will discuss film acting in the context of stage acting: its history from the 17th to 20th century, its theories and systems (Delsarte, Stanislavsky, Meyerhold) and in the context of fine arts. We will also look at various theories of impact (empathy, identification, etc) and at some influential texts in the history of performance (Diderot, Coquelin, Kleist).

History of International Cinema, Part I, Silent Era

28500
48500
ARTH 28500/38500, CMLT 22400/32400, COVA 26500, ENGL 29300/48700, MAPH 33600
  • Graduate/Undergraduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
J. Lastra

This is the first part of a two-quarter course. The two parts may be taken individually, but taking them in sequence is helpful. The aim of this course is to introduce students to what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We will discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Race, Media, and Visual Culture

51300
CDIN 51300, ARTH 49309, ENGL 51300
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
D. English, W.J.T. Mitchell

This seminar will explore the question of race, racism, and racial identity across a variety of media and social practices, including photography and cinema, visual art and literature, and the iconology of everyday life.  The seminar will provide a twin introduction to the fundamentals of visual cultural theory and media studies, on the one hand, and racial theory on the “other.” The study of racial theory will converge with issues of visuality, mediation, and iconology, particularly the question of stereotype and caricature, the role of fantasy and the imaginary in racist perception, and its reproduction and critique in various form of visual art and media. Sponsored by the Center for Disciplinary Innovation (CDI), the seminar will combine methodologies from art history, literary criticism, visual and media studies, as well as anthropology.

Reading and Research

59900
  • Graduate
  • Autumn
  • 2009-2010
Staff

Consent of instructor. Please register by faculty section.

Introduction to Film I

10100
ARTH 20000, ARTV 25300, ENGL 10800, ISHU 20000
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
Staff

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres.  Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception.  Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles. 

The Western

25510
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
M. Hauske

The western was the most dominant genre in Hollywood cinema from the 1910s to the 1960s, constituting as much as one quarter of all production during that time. For this reason the western has played a deep and important role in the development not only of action films but of Hollywood production in general, including even the relocation of American film production from the East Coast to the West Coast. In addition the western has been viewed by critics, scholars, and filmmakers as having a privileged position in regard to reflecting and registering the American condition and the condition of the American state, commenting on both domestic issues including McCarthyism and racism as well as US foreign policy and its role in the world from at least World War II through the Cold War and beyond. This course will provide a survey of the sound western from the 1930s to the 1970s, examining its changing place in Hollywood and America. The western genre will be examined as both a set stylistic and structural choices or possibilities as well as a group of texts with a special, often allegorical, often problematic, relationship with American current events. Films to be studied include Stagecoach, My Darling Clementine, Red River, High Noon, Rio Bravo, The Wild Bunch, High Plains Drifter, and Blazing Saddles.

Cinema and the City

27201
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
N. Holmes

This course traces out the relations between film style and aesthetics and the experiences and visuality particular to modern city life. Focus will be paid to how films have imagined cities and created narratives around them as well as to ideas about the particularly visual nature of urban space and circulation. Lectures and screenings will cover film cycles and genres from the city symphony and film noir, to Skateboard videos and The Wire, as well as particular directors—Alfred Hitchcock, Jean Pierre Melville, Fritz Lang, Michael Mann, among others—whose body of work indicates an ongoing concern with metropolitan themes and ideas. Though concentrating primarily on North American and European films, South American and Asian cinemas will also be considered, as will be the shifting viewing contexts within which films are watched. Course readings will center primarily on experiences of urban modernity, film form, and film history, but will also cover urbanism and urban history, urban sociology, and architecture.

Reading Course

29700
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
Staff

Consent of faculty adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course may be used to satisfy distribution requirements for Cinema and Media Studies concentrators.

B.A. Research Paper

29900
  • Undergraduate
  • Winter
  • 2009-2010
Staff

PQ: Consent of instructor. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. This course may not be counted toward distribution requirements for the concentration, but may be counted as a free-elective credit.

Pages